You want the truth? Find it with ‘A Few Good Men’ through June 5

Photo courtesy Doug Chapin Thingamajig Theatre Company’s “A Few Good Men” continues its run through June 5 at the Pagosa Springs Center for the Arts, with multiple performances each week.

Photo courtesy Doug Chapin
Thingamajig Theatre Company’s “A Few Good Men” continues its run through June 5 at the Pagosa Springs Center for the Arts, with multiple performances each week.

By Audrey Lane Crocker
Special to The PREVIEW

You want the truth? Jack Nicholson thinks that you can’t handle the truth.

In Aaron Sorkin’s stage script (which incidentally predated the film), the battle between right and wrong, good and evil, justice and need are at odds. The truth is paramount, especially in a court of law. But what happens when your truth is one that saves lives, but isn’t the prettiest truth to hear?

Col. Jessup, Lt. Kaffe, Lt. Galloway and Lt. Weinberg are faced with just this dilemma in Thingamajig Theatre Company’s production of “A Few Good Men,” which opened last weekend and runs through June 5, starring Thingamajig favorites Craig Dolezel, Dennis Elkins, Audrey Crocker and returner Jeremy Williams (“Full Monty,” “Spamalot”) and utilizing the local talents of Bob Brobst and Gus Palma.

When two Marines are arrested and charged with murder, the case seems clear-cut to an outsider. Someone who isn’t part of the military and doesn’t subscribe to its chain of command (this is literal, not a euphemism) would look at the facts of the case and say that clearly, two men attacking a weaker kid is assault. When assault ends in death, whether accidental or not, the two attackers are still to blame. A closer look, however, reminds the audience that in the military, there are no actions taken without an order being given first.

Kaffe, a lawyer new to the JAG corps, is used to getting his way in life and when he’s assigned this case, assumes that it is because he is the best for the job. Lt. Jo Galloway thinks a little differently. She sees the assignment as a dismissal of the gravity of the situation and refuses to let him go it alone. The push and pull between the two lawyers and their separate styles causes friction in the representation and ultimately raises the question of who gets to decide what is truly right or wrong.

Tickets to this classic drama are $28 in advance or $32 at the door and can be purchased online at www.pagosacenter.org or by calling 731-7469.

Thingamajig Theatre, a 501c3 nonprofit, is a year-round professional theater company that brings in professional directors, designers and performers from across the country.

This story was posted on May 31, 2016.