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Please help your library staff, best donation practices

SUN columnist, and the library staff

How would you like to arrive at your workplace, only to find full bags and piles of trash waiting at the front door? That’s essentially what happened to your library staff one morning a few weeks ago. Stacks of books and magazines sat on the bench with five huge bags of mostly magazines on the ground nearby.

Trouble is, the magazines were decades old, the videos were broken, and the books were torn, dirty and musty smelling. The entire lot went straight to the trash.

We are very grateful for your donations to our collection. In fact, donated materials are vital to our ability to serve you well, given the fact that we are a small library with a limited budget. But donations do not help if we just become a place to dump stuff that you should have put out with the trash yourself. Sad to say, as the annual summer book sale draws closer, we get a lot of donations, too many of them junk.

Whether you are a regular donor or anticipate doing some spring cleaning, here are our suggestions for win-win donation practices:

• Please do bring in clean, gently worn books, CDs and DVDs. Please plan to wait 5-10 minutes if you need a receipt for your taxes. It helps save time if you bring a list of your donated items. Or we will mail a receipt to you.

• Please do not bring in any VHS tapes or cassettes, or any magazine older than one year. Also, don’t leave personal items inside of donations or deliver donations after hours.

Here’s a bottom-line test: If you would not want that item in your living room, den or bedroom, then please do not bring it to the library as a donation.

Special thanks

The June issue of LPEA’s Colorado Country Life magazine features a lovely photo of Jackie Welch, your library director, accepting $260 worth of new books, a mix of fiction and nonfiction, many by Colorado authors, donated by LPEA to the Sisson Library.

Summer Reading
Program

This year’s free Summer Reading Program started June 2 and runs through July 25. It’s not too late to sign up and join the fun. You can register online via a link on our website at http://pagosa.colibraries.org/ or in the library. Summer reading activities are open to everyone from babies to adults. Also, summer reading participants should mark your calendars for a free all-ages closing party on July 25 from 5:30 to 7 p.m. (after the library closes) that will include awarding of prizes, refreshments and entertainment by the San Juan Mountain Boys. Detailed summer reading schedules for all ages are available at the library. The events also will be featured every week in this Library News column.

Intro to hydroponics

Join us next Thursday, June 19, from 10 a.m. to noon to learn the basics of hydroponic gardening and leave with your first hydroponic window herb garden.

Wise Traditions

Join us for lively discussions and lectures on a variety of topics including dietary needs, agriculture, medical traditions and more on the second Saturday of each month — for June, on the 14th — from 3 to 4:30 p.m. All ages welcome. No registration required.

Technology classes

Meg Wempe is available for the highly popular Tech Tuesdays and Thursdays sessions 10 to noon Tuesdays and 3 to 5 p.m. Thursdays. A more formal session requiring registration is Staying Safe Online on Wednesday, June 18, from 12:30 to 2:30 p.m., where you will learn about strong passwords, phishing, pop-ups and web reliability.

Adult, teen, kids movies 

Every Friday we have three different movies showing: For kids at 10 a.m., for teens at noon, and for adults from 2:30 to 4:30 p.m. The contract we have for the movie licensing does not allow us to promote the title of what we’re showing outside the library, such as in the newspaper or on the radio. If you want to know what show is playing on a given date, pick up the monthly adult activities flyer at the library.

Thursday Kids’ Zone

“It’s Sense-ational” is this week’s theme today (Thursday, June 12) for first- through third-graders from 1:30 to 2:45 p.m.

LEGO Club

Kids aged 6-13 are invited to have fun with LEGOs this Saturday, June 14 from 10 to 11:30 a.m. (note new time). Bring your creativity — the LEGOs are provided.

Teen fun on Wednesdays

Wednesday, June 18, join us from 3-4:30 p.m in the small room for Zombified Hotrods, where you will design your own vehicle to fight with in a zombie apocalypse.

Tween gaming

Every Tuesday from 1:30 to 2:45 p.m. we host Tween Gaming for fourth- though sixth-graders. The gaming is structured and we play a new game each week. Snacks provided.

Teen gaming and crafts

Every Tuesday from 4-5:30 p.m. we host Teen Gaming (X-box, Wii, board games and Pokemon card battles), and you are welcome to bring other trading card battle games. Snacks provided.

Nonfiction

“Colorado Easy & Scenic Hikes” by Dave Miller is a guide to 130 easier hikes in the state. “The Second Amendment: A Biography” by Michael Waldman looks at the most controversial and misunderstood provision of the Bill of Rights. “Birdmen” by historian Lawrence Goldstone explores the rivalry between the Wright Brothers and Glenn Curtiss. “The Medicinal Gardening Handbook” by Dede Cummings and Alyssa Holmes is a guide to growing, harvesting and using healing herbs.

DVDs

“Finding Joe” explores how the hero’s journey is essential in today’s world. “The Iron Giant” features an enormous robot who comes to Earth.

CDs

“The Target” by David Baldacci is the latest in the Robie and Reel political suspense series. “Live to See Tomorrow” by Iris Johansen is about a CIA rescue mission. “The Journey of Souls” by Michael Newton documents case studies about the mystery of life between lives.

Mysteries, suspense and thrillers

“Murder at Mullings” by Dorothy Cannell is a Florence Norris mystery. “The Secret Life of Violet Grant” by Beatriz Williams explores a hushed-over crime of passion. “The Heiresses” by Sara Shepard is a mystery involving the family of a jewelry empire. “Skin Game” by Jim Butcher is a Dresden Files urban fantasy. “The Son” by Jo Nesbo follows an escaped prisoner hunting down people who committed crimes against his father. “Borderline” by Lawrence Block follows a man trying to escape over the Mexican border. “Hot Lead, Cold Iron” by Ari Armell is a Mick Oberon 1930s PI story. “The Lincoln Myth” by Steve Berry features ex-agent Malone. “The Bones Beneath” by Mark Billingham is the 12th in the series featuring detective inspector Tom Thorne.

Other new novels

“Gray” by Shelley Shepard is a romance set in Amish country. “The Possibilities” by Kaui Hart Hemmings is the follow-up to “The Descendants” and is set in Breckenridge. “People of the Morning Star” by archaeologists W. Michael Gear and Kathleen O’Neal Gear is the start of a new series about the North American equivalent of ancient Rome. “The Last Kind Words Saloon” by Larry McMurtry is a novel of the 19th century cowboy lifestyle.

Thanks to our donors

For books and materials this week, we thank Shane and Isaiah Giles, Joan Jessen, Virginia Kyle, Stephanie Morrow and all of our anonymous donors.

Quotable quote

“Spring is nature’s way of saying, ‘Let’s party!’” — Robin Williams, contemporary American actor and comedian.

Website

For more information on library books, services and programs — and to reserve books, e-books, CDs and DVDs from the comfort of your home — please visit our website at http://pagosa.colibraries.org/.

This story was posted on June 12, 2014.