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Lecture series: ‘Navajo Lake — Rock Art and the Dine Culture’

By Nadia Werby
Special to The PREVIEW

Photo courtesy Janet Marie Clawson-Cano Navajo Lake rock art is the focus of a presentation by Janet Marie Clawson-Cano of the Chimney Rock Interpretive Association, on Thursday, Feb. 13, at the community center.

Photo courtesy Janet Marie Clawson-Cano
Navajo Lake rock art is the focus of a presentation by Janet Marie Clawson-Cano of the Chimney Rock Interpretive Association, on Thursday, Feb. 13, at the community center.

Chimney Rock Interpretive Association (CRIA) is proud to present a special presentation on “Navajo Lake — Rock Art and the Dine Culture” by Janet Marie Clawson-Cano on Thursday, Feb. 13.

The lecture is free of charge and will take place from 7-8 p.m. following CRIA’s monthly potluck at 6 p.m. at the Ross Aragon Community Center located at 451 Hot Springs Blvd.

For the past two years, Clawson-Cano has served as the seasonal environmental educator/interpreter at Navajo State Park near Arboles, producing a variety of weekend programs ranging from nature hikes, archaeology/fossils, hydrology, arts, crafts and fish painting, and she has revived a Junior Ranger Program.

Clawson-Cano holds three degrees from the University of Denver and Pueblo Community College. She has worked as a private and federal field archaeologist in a five-state region.

Few realize that, prior to the construction of Navajo reservoir in the 1960s, an incredible wealth of Navajo rock art filled the canyons. This was the Northern edge of the Dinetah –— the old Navajo Homeland where, from the 1400s to the 1750s, the Dine flourished and developed much of what marks the Navajo culture today. Now underwater, the rock art is connected to Navajo archaeoastronomy and spirituality.

The public is invited to join CRIA for their monthly potluck preceding the lecture at 6 p.m. Please bring your favorite dish to share and join our volunteers to learn more about this nonprofit organization which operates the interpretive program at Chimney Rock National Monument.

CRIA operates in partnership with the USDA Forest Service and the San Juan National Forest. For more information, please view the CRIA website at www.chimneyrockco.org, or call 731-7133.

This story was posted on February 6, 2014.