Falls prevention, driver safety classes scheduled

A Matter of Balance is an award-winning falls-prevention program designed to reduce the fear of falling and increase the activity levels of older adults who have concerns about falls.
The classes help participants to: view falls and fear of falling as controllable, set realistic goals for increasing activity, change their environment to reduce fall risk factors, and promote exercise to increase strength and balance.
You can benefit from the classes if: You are concerned about falls; have sustained a fall in the past; you restrict activities because of concerns about falling; you are interested in improving flexibility, balance and strength; you are age 60 or older, ambulatory and able to problem solve.
The Pagosa Springs Senior Center is pleased to announce our fourth Matter of Balance program. The Matter of Balance program lasts eight weeks. Classes are on Wednesdays beginning on Sept. 5. Each class is from 9 to 11 a.m. Snacks will be provided. Class size is limited.
Please call 264-2167 for more information or to register. Classes are free.
Second AARP Smart Driver course scheduled
The AARP Smart Driver course, offered by AARP Driver Safety, is the nation’s first and largest refresher course designed specifically for drivers age 50 and older.
For more than 35 years, the course has taught 16 million drivers proven safety strategies so they can continue driving safely for as long as possible.
More than nine in 10 course participants report changing at least one key driving behavior for the better as a result of what they learned in the course, and more than eight in 10 participants felt that information they learned in the course has prevented them from being in a crash. Plus, you may be eligible to receive an insurance discount upon completing the course, so consult your insurance agent for details.
AARP membership is not required to take the course.
The classroom course costs only $15 for AARP members and $20 for nonmembers.
To register, visit aarp.org/findacourse. The Senior Center staff will be glad to help you register.
Due to popular demand, the Senior Center is hosting a second class on Sept. 14 from 1 to 5 p.m.
Health and wellness
The Senior Center has a pilot program expanding health and wellness services to Archuleta County seniors. The program includes wellness and blood pressure monitoring, or allows individual area seniors to discuss two subjects of their choice.
There is no charge for Medicare enrollees. Participant IDs will include Medicare card, photo ID and, if necessary, any supplemental insurances. No Medicaid is accepted at this time. Participants are encouraged to bring a list of their current medications.
Clinical assessment will be provided by Tabitha Zappone, FNP-C.
The goal of the outreach clinic is to provide care to those who are not able to travel.
The next health and wellness event is scheduled for Aug. 22.
San Juan Basin Area Agency on Aging:
Bullying is ageless III
By Kay Kaylor
I advocate for residents at Pine Ridge and BeeHive Homes as the part-time long-term care ombudsman for Archuleta County. Federal and state laws protect residents to promote quality of care and quality of life.
Bullying in long-term care, senior housing and senior centers impacts elders in several ways, including self-isolation, retaliation followed by guilt and feelings of depression, anger, frustration and anxiety. Friends and family who see people exhibiting these behaviors and feelings might consider them as warning signs of bullying. Other bullied people might make vague complaints, such as “They don’t like me” or “won’t let me,” or avoid specific areas and activities, noted Dr. Robin Bonifas at Arizona State University in 2015.
Warning signs of possible bullies are those who intimidate staff, boss others around, criticize others, appear to lack empathy, and make outraged and repeated complaints about people, even to the point of claiming to be bullied themselves.
Elders do find successful ways to cope, such as avoiding contact with the upsetting individual, letting go, biting their tongue or tuning out and calming others down. They also pursue individual activities, spend time with pets, engage with supportive people and strive to see the bully’s point of view.
Preventing and minimizing bullying requires approaches at the organizational level, as well as with bullies and their targets, with the goal of creating caring communities. Part IV will present some ideas and examples
For further information, you may call me at 403-2164 or send an email to ombudsman2@sjbaaa.org
Menu
Everyone is welcome to join us for lunch. If you are a senior (60 years and older), for only a $4 suggested donation, you are eligible for a hot meal, drink and a salad prepared by our kitchen staff.
The guest fee for those 59 and under is $10 and children 10 years and under can eat for $8.50 each. Access to the salad bar is only $6 for those under 60.
Lunch is served from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Thursday, Aug. 16 — Turkey sausage soup, green peas, milk, salad bar and brownie.
Friday, Aug. 17 — Chicken Marsala with fettuccine, bacon green beans, spinach souffle, polenta cake, milk and salad bar.
Monday, Aug. 20 — Beef lasagna, lemon roasted eggplant, seasoned asparagus, milk, salad bar and blond brownie.
Tuesday, Aug. 21 — Tilapia tacos with black bean, peach and pineapple salsa, tomatoes Provencal, milk, salad bar and lemon cream pie.
Wednesday, Aug. 22 — Turkey broccoli with brown rice casserole, snap pea medley, milk, salad bar and ice cream sundae.
Thursday, Aug. 23 — Pork green chile stew, glazed carrots, squash calabacitas, cornbread muffin with butter, milk and salad bar.
Reservations and cancellations are required. You can make a reservation at 264-2167 by 9 a.m. the morning of the day you would like to dine in the Community Cafe at the Senior Center.

This story was posted on August 17, 2018.