Reservoir Hill – The Pagosa Springs SUN http://www.pagosasun.com The most trusted source for news and information about Pagosa Springs, Colorado. Thu, 15 Aug 2019 21:43:41 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.2.2 Wild Rivers, Mile Twelve to perform at Four Corners Folk Festival http://www.pagosasun.com/2019/08/19/wild-rivers-mile-twelve-to-perform-at-four-corners-folk-festival/ Mon, 19 Aug 2019 11:00:15 +0000 http://www.pagosasun.com/?p=175528

Photo courtesy FolkWest
Four Corners Folk Festival goers will have two opportunities to experience Wild Rivers atop Reservoir Hill, at 12:30 p.m. on Aug. 31 and again on Sept. 1 at 1 p.m.

By Crista Munro
Special to The PREVIEW
The 24th annual Four Corners Folk Festival is coming up at the end of this month, taking place Aug. 30-Sept. 1 on Reservoir Hill in downtown Pagosa Springs.
Tickets are selling quickly for this year’s event, no doubt due to the epic lineup that includes The Earls of Leicester, Billy Strings, Amy Helm, Molly Tuttle, The Mammals, Darrell Scott, Rob Ickes and Trey Hensley, The East Pointers, Lindsay Lou, JigJam, The Arcadian Wild, Maybe April and this week’s featured artists: Wild Rivers and Mile Twelve.
Wild Rivers
Wild Rivers immerse their folk-pop originals into the warm musical styles of the artists that influenced them. With more than 33 million streams on Spotify, the four-piece band out of Toronto, Ontario, effortlessly blends exquisite harmonies, beautiful songwriting and a captivating stage presence, while their vibe fits equally well in listening rooms and symphony halls.
The inviting harmonies of Wild Rivers provide a shimmering texture to the band’s most recent EP “Eighty-Eight.” However, dedicated fans know about the depth of Wild Rivers — from the alluring melodies that take an unexpected turn to the undercurrent of emotion in their tightly crafted lyrics.
Wild Rivers is composed of Khalid Yassein (vocals, guitar), Devan Glover (vocals), Ben Labenski (drums) and Andrew Oliver (bass). Over the past three years, the ensemble has toured consistently across the U.S. and Canada and has earned a reputation as a band that makes a powerful connection with listeners.
Festival goers will have two opportunities to experience that connection on Reservoir Hill: Aug. 31 at 12:30 p.m. and again on Sept. 1 at 1 p.m.

Photo courtesy FolkWest
Mile Twelve will play the main stage of the Four Corners Folk Festival on Aug. 30 at 4:30 p.m. and again on the late night stage that same night at 11 p.m.

Mile Twelve
Another young breakout band, Mile Twelve takes traditional bluegrass stylings and instrumentation and turns them into a modern sound that crosses genre boundaries. Mile Twelve surveys a broader landscape on their newest album, “City on a Hill.” All five band members bring their own influences and observations into the music, resulting in a project that feels contemporary, thoughtfully crafted and relevant.
“Original bluegrass music, written and played by young people, is very much alive,” said band member Evan Murphy. “I hope people take away that songwriting and arranging really matter. It’s about the material and playing it in a way that feels honest. This album isn’t political in the sense that we’re beating people over the head with anything, we just tried to tell stories that feel authentic.”
The album title alludes to the idealized imagery of a shining city on a hill — a historical phrase that has often been applied to Boston, where the band got its start.
Murphy added, “We realized that many of the characters in these songs were in crisis, had been failed in some way or were failing themselves. It’s an unintentional theme, but it came out in the songwriting.”
The Mile Twelve lineup offers five of the most promising young musicians in bluegrass: David Benedict (mandolin), Catherine “BB” Bowness (banjo), Bronwyn Keith-Hynes (fiddle), Murphy (guitar, lead vocals) and Nate Sabat (bass, lead vocals). All are credited as songwriters because everyone in the band helped shape the material throughout the writing and arranging process. Murphy and Sabat initiated most of the lyrical ideas for “City on a Hill” while Benedict wrote the instrumental track “Rialto.”
“We all inspire each other and recognize that everyone has different strengths,” Murphy said. “What makes this band so collaborative is that everyone in the band can do something at a really high level. That’s the balance. We’re all challenging each other.”
Produced by Bryan Sutton and engineered by Ben Surratt, “City on a Hill” begins with a lively rendition of Richard and Linda Thompson’s “Down Where the Drunkards Roll.” From there, the album explores a number of unexpected perspectives, such as a modern war veteran with post-traumatic stress disorder (“Jericho”), a Jewish immigrant fleeing war (“Liberty”), and a man who cannot escape the stigma of the penal system (“Innocent Again”). As the album winds down, the light-hearted power waltz “Barefoot in Jail” and the ethereal, old-time dream sequence “Journey’s End” lead to the poignant “Where We Started,” a portrait of small-town life written by John Cloyd Miller.
“City on a Hill” follows multiple IBMA Momentum Awards, presented by the International Bluegrass Music Association to emerging bluegrass artists. Mile Twelve won the band category in 2017, shortly before releasing their debut album, “Onwards.” The following year, Keith-Hynes and Benedict secured IBMA Momentum Awards in instrumental categories, while the band earned two major IBMA Award nominations for Emerging Artist and Instrumental Performance of the Year in 2018.
Those kind of accomplishments were far from anyone’s minds when Murphy, Sabat, Keith-Hynes and Bowness started crossing paths at house parties and pick-up gigs in Boston. In time, they recognized each other as regulars at a Cambridge dive bar called The Cantab Lounge during Tuesday night bluegrass jams. In 2014, they decided to start their own band. By gathering grassroots and industry support, they were well on their way when Benedict, who was living in Nashville at the time, relocated to Boston to join the band in 2016.
Sutton observed, “I’m a fan of bands who strive for a balance of being musically unique and individualized, while at the same time working to include time-honored traditions found in this music. This blend is not an easy thing to accomplish. Mile Twelve does this with well-honed and refreshingly honest songwriting, along with powerful playing, singing and performing. Not only did I have the privilege of producing this album, but I also got a chance to know the band better. I’m impressed with how much they bring out the best in each other.”
The band takes their name from the mile marker that sits at Boston’s southern border on route 93, the city’s main artery. It’s a road sign they’ve passed countless times while heading out on tour. Through an active social media audience and radio support from terrestrial stations and Sirius XM, the band has found receptive audiences across the globe, touring all over North America as well as Ireland, Australia, New Zealand and Japan.
Asked about the band’s influences, Murphy cites Alison Krauss and Union Station for their precise arrangements and execution, the Del McCoury Band for their grit and groove, and the Punch Brothers for their genre-bending virtuosity. As for writing, Murphy praises the mastery of Gillian Welch and Jason Isbell for their ability to tell a fully realized story within the confines of a three-minute song.
These influences shine through in “City on a Hill,” but at the core the album is a representation of the band’s emerging voice. “We decided to record this album as live and authentically as possible,” Murphy said. “There was no metronome, no filler material, no smoke and mirrors. It was very real, you know? We all feel that the end result is an honest statement of who we are.”
Mile Twelve will play the festival main stage on Aug. 30 at 4:30 p.m. and again on the late night stage that same night at 11 p.m.
More information
We are still looking for a couple dozen volunteers to round out the weekend’s schedule. Volunteers age 17 and up can earn complimentary three-day festival admission by working two four-hour shifts before, during or after the festival. Tickets and additional information about the festival, including the main stage schedule and information on all of the artists, can be found online at www.folkwest.com.
The Four Corners Folk Festival is supported in part with matching funds from Colorado Creative Industries.

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Tickets selling quickly for Four Corners Folk Festival http://www.pagosasun.com/2019/08/14/tickets-selling-quickly-for-four-corners-folk-festival/ Wed, 14 Aug 2019 11:00:14 +0000 http://www.pagosasun.com/?p=174940 By Crista Munro
Special to The PREVIEW
The 24th annual Four Corners Folk Festival is coming up at the end of this month, taking place Aug. 30-Sept. 1 on Reservoir Hill.
Tickets are selling quickly for this year’s event, no doubt due to the epic lineup that includes The Earls of Leicester, Billy Strings, Amy Helm, Molly Tuttle, The Mammals, Darrell Scott, Rob Ickes and Trey Hensley, Lindsay Lou, JigJam, Mile Twelve, Wild Rivers, The Arcadian Wild and this week’s featured artists: Maybe April and The East Pointers.

Photo courtesy FolkWest
Maybe April will perform on the main stage of the Four Corners Folk Festival twice, on Aug. 30 at 3 p.m. and Sept. 1 at 11:30 a.m.

Maybe April
Maybe April is a country Americana group made up of Katy DuBois (Bishop) and Alaina Stacey. Hailing from Jonesboro, Ark., and Chicago, Ill., they met in the summer of 2012 at a music industry camp in Nashville. They wrote a song that would later take them to Los Angeles to play at a Grammy week event, along with Bonnie Raitt, Kris Kristofferson, Allen Shamblin, Gavin DeGraw, J.D. Souther, Joy Williams from the Civil Wars, and many others. Since then, amongst hundreds of shows, the girls have opened for Brandy Clark and Sarah Jarosz, played Pilgrimage Music Festival and IBMA’s Wide Open Bluegrass Festival, and had their video “Last Time” premiered on CMT.
Maybe April is recognized for their harmonies, strength as instrumentalists, original songs and shared roles as frontwomen, each adding something different from their musical backgrounds to create a unique sound somewhere in between Americana and country. Their love for each other and their music continues to push them in their endeavors in Nashville, where they have been based since 2013.
FolkWest favorites Kate Lee and Forest O’Connor will be joining the ensemble for their appearances at the Four Corners Folk Festival on Aug. 30 at 3 p.m. and Sept. 1 at 11:30 a.m.

Photo courtesy FolkWest
The East Pointers will bring their entertaining live show to the stage of the Four Corners Folk Festival at 4 p.m. on Sept. 1.

The East Pointers
There’s a reason, beyond their dazzling musicianship and wildly entertaining live shows, that The East Pointers have connected with audiences right across the globe, making new, original roots music the hippest, most vibrant thing going.
The reason? The East Pointers — fiddler/singer Tim Chaisson, banjoist Koady Chaisson and guitarist Jake Charron — write about real life, sketching out its joys and sorrows in vivid strokes. That palpable authenticity makes their instrumental tunes practically cartwheel and infuses their lyric-driven songs with poignancy. And it’s why listening to The East Pointers’ brilliant and hotly anticipated second album “What We Leave Behind” — produced by superstar East Coast-bred songwriter/producer Gordie Sampson — is akin to meeting up with an old friend.
As a follow-up to 2015’s internationally acclaimed, JUNO Award-winning debut “Secret Victory,” “What We Leave Behind” shares stories previously unheard but framed by a familiar context. The album reflects on the traditions of Canadian Celtic music, where it comes from, and what it means to the people, but also strides in new directions. With a captivating balance between their traditional-sounding instrumental tunes, and catchy radio-ready songs, The East Pointers reach out with open arms to a wide range of listeners, inviting them to discover a new love of folk music.
Never before have The East Pointers so deftly leveraged the whole spectrum of human emotion, drawing inspiration straight from the world they live in. That’s especially evident in a pair of striking new songs featuring Tim Chaisson’s lead vocals: the trembling first single “82 Fires” and the melancholy “Two Weeks,” co-written with Sampson amid recording sessions last winter.
“While in Penguin, Tasmania, we spoke with an older gentleman, a lifelong resident, who said that there were 82 wildfires currently on the loose in Tasmania, the most in over half a century. It hit home the severity of what we were all experiencing,” said Koady Chaisson. “It was a restless few days for us. Small human decisions about where to live, or whether or not the show would go on didn’t matter, Mother Nature would always have the final say. Being in the middle of that brings an immediacy about it, you can feel powerless.”
The plaintive “Two Weeks,” meanwhile, documents a passage depressingly common in the bands’ home province of Prince Edward Island and played out the world over in economically challenged communities: the need to leave home and travel far away from friends and family to find work.
“When I played that song for my mom, she said ‘That’s going to hit home for a lot of people,’” Koady Chaisson explained. “Many families are forced to split their time, with at least one member having to go out west — usually to Alberta — to make ends meet. It’s so hard. I did it, though luckily not for long, but there are people in my community going through it month after month, year after year.”
The flip side of “What We Leave Behind” — and indeed, of The East Pointers’ electrifying concerts — are scorching instrumental tunes that yank the freewheeling, Celtic-goosed past into the present, defying anyone to sit still in their chair.
“Traditional music has always been at the core of what we do as a band,” added Jake Charron. “There’s something powerful about a style of music that has been passed on for generations around the world.”
A new take on this tradition is evident in the spry “Party Wave,” inspired by a thrilling surfing experience the band enjoyed in New Zealand, one of many countries The East Pointers visited during 10 months of touring last year. The tunes, written this past year on the road, take you on a journey, building with excitement before transforming into a full-on dance party.
Rounding out the album, the melancholic “John Wallace” — about a 19th century shipwreck off the coast of Prince Edward Island — and the mournful “Hid in Your Heart” uphold the band’s devotion to documenting real life, tragedy and all.
“What We Leave Behind” carves a new path for The East Pointers, as they continue to blur the lines between traditional and popular music and develop a devoted fan base around the globe.
Get ready to move when the trio takes the stage on at 4 p.m. on Sept. 1.
More information
We’re looking for our last few volunteers to round out the schedule. Volunteers age 17 and up can earn complimentary three-day festival admission by working two four-hour shifts before, during or after the festival. Tickets and additional information about the festival, including the main stage schedule and information on all of the artists, can be found online at www.folkwest.com.
The Four Corners Folk Festival is supported in part with matching funds from Colorado Creative Industries.

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Darrell Scott, Billy Strings set to take the Folk Festival stage http://www.pagosasun.com/2019/08/05/darrell-scott-billy-strings-set-to-take-the-folk-festival-stage/ Mon, 05 Aug 2019 11:00:32 +0000 http://www.pagosasun.com/?p=174284 By Crista Munro
Special to The PREVIEW
The 24th annual Four Corners Folk Festival will take place over Labor Day Weekend, Aug. 30-Sept. 1, on Reservoir Hill.
Once again, the event has put together a stellar lineup that includes The Earls of Leicester, Amy Helm, Molly Tuttle, The Mammals, The East Pointers, Rob Ickes and Trey Hensley, Lindsay Lou, JigJam, Mile Twelve, Wild Rivers, The Arcadian Wild, Maybe April and this week’s featured artists: Darrell Scott and Billy Strings.

Photo courtesy FolkWest
Darrell Scott will be back for another FolkWest performance at 5:30 on Sept. 1 at the 24th annual Four Corners Folk Festival.

Darrell Scott
“I look like an insider because of everything I’ve done, but I always felt like an outsider,” Scott said. “And that’s important — to be an outsider.”
But he’s also a master.
Whether it’s rock, folk, country or blues, Scott — the four-time Grammy-nominated Nashville songwriter — has written hits for artists ranging from Brad Paisley and the Dixie Chicks to Del McCoury, Sam Bush and Keb’ Mo’, contributing songs to three of 2016’s best albums alone. It’s not surprising that Scott wrote nine of the 14 songs on his own new album, “Couchville Sessions,” and less surprising that he wrote three songs with the like-minded Americana artist Hayes Carll on Carll’s magnificent new disc, “Lovers and Leavers,” in addition to “1000 Things” from Sarah Jarosz’s award-winning “Build Me Up From Bones” album.
What’s more surprising is that Scott came off of a year and a half of touring in Robert Plant’s Band of Joy with a co-write on R&B star Anthony Hamilton’s new recording, “Save Me,” the opening track on “What I’m Feelin.” Over the past two years, Scott has produced, co-written and performed on three songs from Zac Brown’s latest project, “Heavy Is the Head,” in addition to producing Jonathan Edwards latest and Malcolm Holcombe’s 2017 release, “Pretty Little Troubles.” But these partnerships all make sense; although they hail from different genres, these artists are master craftsmen at fitting words to notes.
Witness Scott’s ability to make just about any instrument talk; listen to his vocals and songwriting to hear him contain every emotion between joy and pain within one verse in his singing and in his pen. Nowadays, he’s taking the outsider role even more seriously. After 23 years in Nashville, he spent the last year devoting himself to a self-sufficient lifestyle in the country while simultaneously putting together his best album in years.
A regular artist on FolkWest’s stages, we are thrilled to welcome Scott back with his band in 2019. Fans can catch his main stage set on Sept. 1 at 5:30 p.m.

Photo courtesy FolkWest
Billy Strings will perform in a headline set at the 24th annual Four Corners Folk Festival, with the set beginning at 8:30 p.m. on Aug. 31.

Billy Strings
Strings plays hard and he lives hard, picking so fast and intensely that he’s known to break multiple strings per song. He bases the songs he writes on the hard lives he grew up around in the abandoned rural communities of America. His most recent album, “Turmoil and Tinfoil,” taps into a deep vein of psychedelia in Americana, referencing everything from The Dead to Sturgill Simpson, but all underlaid by Strings’ undeniable virtuosity and his knowledge of the roots of American music. He’s one of the most beloved young bluegrass guitarists today within the bluegrass community, and his front porch in East Nashville is constantly filled up with Nashville’s best roots musicians just picking up a storm.
The tricky part of making “Turmoil and Tinfoil” was translating Strings’ incendiary live show into the studio. While deeply reverent of the roots of traditional bluegrass music, which his father shared with him as a boy, Strings learned his high-energy performing skills by playing fleet-fingered guitar solos in a heavy metal band in his native Michigan. Returning to his home state of Michigan, Strings enlisted acoustic roots wizard Glenn Brown (Greensky Bluegrass) as producer, and centered the music around his new band, featuring Jarrod Walker on mandolin with banjo prodigy Billy Failing and much-loved Nashville bassist Royal Masat.
Rich with special guests, “Turmoil and Tinfoil” shows off Strings’ East Nashville community of picking friends, among them Miss Tess, Molly Tuttle, John Mailander, Shad Cobb and Peter Madcat Ruth. Of special note is a virtuosic duet between Strings and bluegrass guitarist Bryan Sutton on “Salty Sheep” that shows the speed, precision and creative craftsmanship of bluegrass when it’s done right.
Poised to take bluegrass in bold new directions, singer/songwriter/guitarist Strings is quickly gaining attention for his live performances and imbuing his take on Americana with distinctive bursts of psychedelic virtuosity. While he has matured as a player, singer and songwriter in his own right, and re-embraced the music his father introduced him to, Strings has applied the intensity of heavy metal to bluegrass. The end results provide a fresh jolt to the genre.
Billy Strings will close with a headline set on at 8:30 p.m. on Aug. 31 at 8:30 p.m.
More information
Volunteer applications are now available on the website and scheduling is underway, so potential volunteers are urged to apply as soon as possible. Work two four-hour shifts to earn complimentary three-day festival admission. Tickets and additional information about the festival, including the main stage schedule and information on all of the artists, can be found online at www.folkwest.com.
The Four Corners Folk Festival is supported in part with matching funds from Colorado Creative Industries.

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JigJam, Lindsay Lou to perform at 24th annual Four Corners Folk Festival http://www.pagosasun.com/2019/07/31/jigjam-lindsay-lou-to-perform-at-24th-annual-four-corners-folk-festival/ Wed, 31 Jul 2019 11:00:09 +0000 http://www.pagosasun.com/?p=173724 By Crista Munro
Special to The PREVIEW
The 24th annual Four Corners Folk Festival will be here before you know it, taking place over Labor Day weekend, Aug, 30-Sept. 1, on Reservoir Hill.
The stellar 2019 lineup includes The Earls of Leicester, Billy Strings, Amy Helm, Darrell Scott, Molly Tuttle, The Mammals, The East Pointers, Rob Ickes and Trey Hensley, Mile Twelve, Wild Rivers, The Arcadian Wild, Maybe April and this week’s featured artists: JigJam or Lindsay Lou.

Photo courtesy FolkWest
JigJam will bring Irish-influenced bluegrass to the stage of the 24th annual Four Corners Folk Festival at 3:30 p.m. on Aug. 31.

JigJam
JigJam is a multi-award-winning quartet from the heart of the midlands in Ireland. Blending the best of traditional Irish music with bluegrass and Americana in a new genre which has been branded as “I-Grass” (Irish-influenced bluegrass), the band’s onstage energy, along with the members’ virtuosic musical abilities, has captivated audiences throughout the world.
Jamie McKeogh, Cathal Guinan and Daithi Melia all hail from Tullamore, County Offaly, with County Tipperary-born Gavin Strappe completing the quartet. All four members grew up immersed in Irish traditional music and culture, which is reflected by the band collectively achieving more than 20 All-Ireland titles at Fleadh Cheoil na hÉireann competitions. They have now developed their own unique style of music influenced by American Folk music whilst staying true to their Irish roots.
Described as “The best Irish group so far in bluegrass,” this sharply dressed outfit delivers an energy-fueled, foot-stomping live performance. All multi-instrumentalists, JigJam interchange between banjos, guitars, fiddles, mandolins and double bass onstage, creating an experience which is pleasing to both the eye and the ear.
JigJam has recorded two studio albums (“Oh Boy!” in 2014 and “Hello World” in 2016) to critical acclaim, as well as a live album (“Live in Tullamore” 2017). They have made a huge impact on the Irish American circuit, performing as a headline act at all the major festivals including the world-renowned Telluride Bluegrass Festival and Milwaukee Irish Fest, as well as touring various parts of the UK and Europe.
Festival-goers will have a chance to catch this high-energy Celtic ensemble on Aug. 31 at 3:30 p.m.
Lindsay Lou
Lou has been making soulful, poignant music for the last decade. An undeniable powerhouse, Lou’s remarkable gifts as a singer, songwriter, musician and performer demand the listener’s attention. Her singing floats over the masterful playing and deep groove of her band with both a fierce intensity and a tender intimacy.
Lou’s fourth album, “Southland” (released April 2018), is a transformative and heart-wrenching 10-song stunner. Lou’s voice — and its unique ability to create an expansive, almost physically tangible soundscape — carries each song on “Southland” forward, made even more recognizable and potent by bandmates Josh Rilko (mandolin, vocals) and PJ George (bass, vocals) and special guests.
The beauty with which the sounds on “Southland” slip into the ether is the product of an emotionally difficult time for Lou and her band — who, as musicians often do, entered the studio to “hash it out.” The process, demonstrated by the music on “Southland,” was sincere and stirring and introspective.
“Southland” kicks off with “Roll With Me,” an expansive anthem with Lou’s robust vocals on full display. “Go There Alone” was written during an “Immersion Composition Society” experiment that Lou does from time to time, and the sound fully developed with the band a little later on. The lazy, beautiful harmonies pull at your heartstrings in a way that feels like home, despite the lonely and bittersweet message.
And though songs like “The Voice” and “Southland” were spurred on by more abstract ideas and words, they transformed as collaborators started freestyling with their instruments and Lou simply sang what came to mind. Impressively enough, Lou plays electric bass, electric guitar, and acoustic guitar on the album’s title track. “Southland” is about the natural beauty of the South, which, to Lou, adds a sense of calm and connectedness to a region known too often for its divisiveness. Having recently left her home state of Michigan to put down roots in Nashville with the band, the influence of this change is felt throughout the themes and ideas expressed on “Southland.”
Born the daughter of a coal miner in middle Missouri, Lou’s family moved to Michigan shortly after she was born. She describes her family as close-knit and musical, their lives influenced heavily by her maternal grandmother’s radical ideals and zest for life. In fact, if you ask Lou, her grandmother — a woman who was once put in jail during the civil rights movement for teaching a lesson on the “f” word as a high school literature teacher — is one of her greatest influences to this day. Armed with her activist spirit, Lou’s grandmother set up a Christian commune in Michigan’s Upper Peninsula for her growing family of 12, as well as some stragglers. There in a big farmhouse, Lou’s dad was their neighbor.
Raised with this sense of community, Lou recalls always being surrounded by music. So when the time came for her to join a band, for Lou, it felt like finding a home away from home. Her career, like her life, have been full of great moments of kismet. As a youth, Lou built her repertoire by practicing her vocals, and she picked up the guitar so she could play with her Uncle Stuckey, perhaps most musically influential on her of her mother’s siblings. The skills she honed during the days of learning to sing and play with her family led to a wide variety of musical opportunities: singing in choir in high school, attending an elite summer program at Interlochen on scholarship, and winning awards for her talents.
Today, touring nationally and internationally year-round, Lou and her band continue to collect a mass of friends and fans along the way. Notable U.S. festival plays include Telluride Bluegrass Festival, Merlefest, Stagecoach, Redwing, ROMP, GreyFox and a slew of others. Abroad, they have appeared at Scotland’s Shetland Island Folk Fest and the Celtic Connections tour, Australia’s National Folk Festival, and others. The Boot, who featured Lindsay Lou Band as a “Can’t Miss Act” at AmericanaFest 2018, says “… Lou brings introspection and masterful vocal work to her live show.”
In the words of famed bluegrass musician David Grier, who caught the Lindsay Lou Band at a recent festival, “Lindsay … sings the way you would want to if’n you could. Phrasing, tone, emotion, it’s all there. Effortless seemingly. Simply mesmerizing. Riveting! Don’t miss the musical force that is Lindsay Lou.”
Lou will play the festival main stage on Aug. 31 at 2 p.m.
More information
Volunteer applications are now available on the website and scheduling will begin soon, so potential volunteers are urged to apply as soon as possible. Working two four-hour shifts earn complimentary three-day festival admission.
Tickets and additional information about the festival, including the main stage schedule and information on all of the artists, can be found online at www.folkwest.com.
The Four Corners Folk Festival is supported in part with matching funds from Colorado Creative Industries.

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Rob Ickes and Trey Hensley, The Arcadian Wild set to perform at Four Corners Folk Festival http://www.pagosasun.com/2019/07/21/rob-ickes-and-trey-hensley-the-arcadian-wild-set-to-perform-at-four-corners-folk-festival/ Sun, 21 Jul 2019 11:00:58 +0000 http://www.pagosasun.com/?p=173212 By Crista Munro
Special to The PREVIEW
The 24th annual Four Corners Folk Festival — Pagosa Springs’ traditional end to the summer season — will take place over Labor Day weekend, Aug. 30-Sept. 1, on Reservoir Hill downtown.
The stellar 2019 lineup includes The Earls of Leicester, Billy Strings, Amy Helm, Darrell Scott, Molly Tuttle, The Mammals, The East Pointers, , JigJam, Lindsay Lou, Mile Twelve, Wild Rivers, Maybe April and this week’s featured artists, Rob Ickes and Trey Hensley, and The Arcadian Wild.

Photo courtesy FolkWest
Rob Ickes and Trey Hensley will return to Reservoir Hill for the upcoming Four Corners Folk Festival. The duo is slated to play a 2:30 p.m. set on Sept. 1.

Rob Ickes and
Trey Hensley
Based on a mutual love of bluegrass, country, blues, western swing and other string band music of all kinds, the partnership of dobro player Ickes (who also plays superlative lap steel guitar in the duo on occasion) and acoustic/electric guitarist Hensley continues to delight and astound audiences of traditional American music around the globe. Since the duo decided to join forces and make their collaboration the focus of their touring and recording careers in 2015, after cutting their first album, “Before The Sun Goes Down” (nominated for a Grammy), they have continued to bring their music to venues near and far.
They’ve performed in places as close to home as Nashville’s world famous Station Inn — a frequent and favorite showcase — and as far away as Denmark’s Tonder Festival, as well as an impressive number of the most prestigious U.S. music festivals, including Rockygrass, ROMP, Wintergrass, Bluegrass Underground, Pagosa Folk ‘N Bluegrass and the Freshgrass Festival, just to name a few. They have toured the European continent four times, as well as England, Ireland and Australia.
Their second album, “Country Blues” — released in 2016 — testified to the growing diversity and expansion of their collaborative talents and repertoire. The duo were key players on “Original,” the recent, highly lauded album by bluegrass giant Bobby Osborne; their participation garnered a Recorded Event Of The Year Award for Bobby’s version of “Got To Get A Message To You” on that album at this year’s International Bluegrass Music Association (IBMA) Awards; they also were on the 2016 Recorded Event winner, ”Fireball,” featuring Special Consensus, in 2016. Ickes and Hensley have shared a number of concert bills with the great and influential mandolin master David Grisman and Australia’s fleet finger picking guitarist Tommy Emmanuel, both enthusiastic admirers of the duo.
Ickes and Hensley continue to leave their singular and ever-growing footprint on the world of traditional music of America — be it bluegrass, traditional country, blues or jazz. Of their collaboration, Ickes has said this: “It works in so many different ways … Trey and I have always clicked and when he and I know what’s going on, everyone else just grabs on — and that’s kind of the fun of the gig; it’s constantly changing.”
Whether they’re appearing as a duo, with a bass or with bass, drums and fiddle, they never fail to kick up some musical dust. The excitement at their gigs is palpable, it is contagious and it is constant. Their sets tend to be a heady mix of the familiar and beloved and the new and unexpected. Hensley’s list of powerful original songs has grown quickly since the two started working together and Ickes invariably plays several sparkling instrumentals, both on dobro and lap steel, new and old. He is also on record as saying that one of his great satisfactions as a dobro player is accompanying a great vocalist, something the partnership allows him every night.
Ickes, who grew up in California’s Bay Area, cut his teeth on traditional bluegrass, since several family members played. He fell in love with the dobro, or more precisely the resophonic guitar, almost immediately, after his brother Pat played a tape of the legendary Mike Auldridge for him. After moving to Nashville in the early ‘90s, he quickly became one of the instrument’s acknowledged masters. He soon began touring with several top bluegrass acts and also became a familiar face at recording studios in town. His fluid, lyrical, yet stinging style has graced the recordings and concerts of bluegrass artists as diverse as Earl Scruggs, Alison Krauss, The Cox Family, Tony Rice and more, plus such mainstream artists as Vince Gill, Alan Jackson, Toby Keith, Reba McEntire and even erstwhile rocker David Lee Roth on his “bluegrass” album. Additionally, Ickes has won the Dobro Player of the Year Award from the IBMA an unprecedented 15 times. He was also a founding member of the critically acclaimed bluegrass supergroup Blue Highway for 21 years. Fulfilling a lifelong dream of not only meeting but playing with his personal number one hero, Ickes was a key member of the band who backed fellow Californian Merle Haggard on Haggard’s 2007 album “The Bluegrass Sessions.”
Hensley shares Ickes’ admiration for the legendary Hag and features several of his songs in his repertoire. In fact, his rich, resonant baritone voice can sound at times uncannily like The Okie From Muskogee — but he is capable of far more than that. He also plays blues and rhythm and blues on both acoustic and electric guitar, from the repertoires of artists as diverse as The Allman Brothers, Ray Charles, Charlie Daniels and Stevie Ray Vaughn — and Ickes’ and Hensley’s rendition of The Grateful Dead’s “Friend Of The Devil” needs to be heard live to be fully appreciated. Hensley also shares Haggard’s well-known love of western swing, and he sings it and plays it with authority; Ickes loves playing it, too, often on lap steel guitar. Hensley is also a talented writer; the band’s repertoire is dotted with his original compositions. Both he and Ickes have what is called in the trade “big ears,” and this musical curiosity has enhanced their music immeasurably.
Even more precocious than his musical partner, Hensley grew up in eastern Tennessee, one of the cradles of traditional music. He doesn’t seem to have ever doubted what he was meant to do, and in fact, when he was 11 years old, he was brought onstage by Marty Stuart to play with Stuart and Earl Scruggs — at the Grand Ole Opry. He was making music — and albums — with famous players before his voice changed. He has played onstage or opened for artists as diverse as Johnny Cash, Charlie Daniels, Steve Wariner and Peter Frampton. It was his singing on what was meant to be a scratch vocal on a Blue Highway album that first brought him to the attention of Ickes. Ultimately, the vocal stayed on the album, Hensley moved to Nashville, and in partnership with Ickes, they began to make all manner of exciting music. Shortly after Hensley appeared on the scene in Music City, bluegrass Hall of Famer Roland White was heard to remark in wonderment that he had a new favorite guitar player in Nashville, and White knows a few things about guitar players. Needless to say, White is not the only fan Hensley has made in Nashville.
In many ways, this musical partnership is the ideal vehicle for both partners. Their excitement at playing together continues unabated as their enthusiasm charges the creativity of their collaboration on a nightly basis. It is the audience who stands to be the big winner.
Ickes and Hensley will bring their awesome musicianship and diverse musical style to the 2019 main festival stage on Sept. 1 with a 2:30 p.m. set.

Photo courtesy FolkWest
The Arcadian Wild, touring off the successful release of their sophomore record, will take the stage at the Four Corners Folk Festival at 11 a.m. on Aug. 31.

The Arcadian Wild
The Arcadian Wild began in the fall of 2013 when a few choir students from Lipscomb University in Nashville met up after class to jam for the afternoon. Five years later, the band now consists of guitarist Isaac Horn, mandolinist Lincoln Mick and fiddler Paige Park. Currently, the folk group is touring off the successful release of their sophomore record, “Finch in the Pantry” (May 2019), which debuted at No. 9 on the Billboard bluegrass charts.
With roots running deep in formal vocal music, and influenced by progressive bluegrass and folk artists, The Arcadian Wild explores a unique acoustic sound that is simultaneously unified and diverse, offering up songs of invitation and calls to come and see, to find refuge and rest, or to journey and wonder.
You can catch The Arcadian Wild on the festival main stage on Aug. 31 at 11 a.m.
More information
Tickets and additional information about the festival, including the main stage schedule and information on all of the artists, can be found online at www.folkwest.com. Volunteer applications are now available on the website and scheduling will begin soon, so potential volunteers are urged to apply as soon as possible.
The Four Corners Folk Festival is supported in part with matching funds from Colorado Creative Industries.

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Four Corners Folk Festival set to include Amy Helm and The Mammals http://www.pagosasun.com/2019/07/16/four-corners-folk-festival-set-to-include-amy-helm-and-the-mammals/ Tue, 16 Jul 2019 11:00:48 +0000 http://www.pagosasun.com/?p=172748 By Crista Munro
Special to The PREVIEW
The Four Corners Folk Festival — which has marked the end of Pagosa Springs’ summer season for 24 years — will take place over Labor Day weekend, Aug. 30-Sept. 1, on Reservoir Hill in downtown Pagosa Springs.
The stellar 2019 lineup includes The Earls of Leicester, Billy Strings, Darrell Scott, Molly Tuttle, The East Pointers, Rob Ickes and Trey Hensley, JigJam, Lindsay Lou, Mile Twelve, Wild Rivers, Maybe April, The Arcadian Wild and this week’s featured artists, Amy Helm and The Mammals.

Photo courtesy FolkWest
Amy Helm will return to the 2019 main Four Corners Folk Festival stage on Aug. 31 with a 6:30 p.m. set.

Amy Helm
Helm sought what she calls a “circular sound” for her new album. It’s a well-rounded one — one marked by streaks of Americana, country, blues and gospel, and the kinds of four-part harmonies that can burst open a melody and close the loop of an octave. And, sentimentally, it’s a sound that represents the feeling of community.
“This Too Shall Light,” released Sept. 21, 2018, comprises 10 songs produced by Grammy-winning producer and songwriter Joe Henry. Helm left her home and comfort zone of Woodstock, N.Y., choosing to record in Los Angeles within the confines of just a four-day window. The musicians were directed not to over-think the songs and Helm herself barely performed any of the selections while leading up to the recording. As a result, the sessions forced fast musical trust among the collaborators and yielded the vibrant instrumental improvisations heard throughout “This Too Shall Light.”
Although a profound songwriter herself, Helm and Henry jointly arranged a diverse collection of songs for the record, which range from Rod Stewart’s “Mandolin Wind” to Allen Toussaint’s “Freedom for the Stallion” and even the Milk Carton Kids’ “Michigan.” The title track in particular, written by Hiss Golden Messenger’s MC Taylor and Josh Kaufman (Josh Ritter, Bob Weir, Craig Finn), is a brilliant summation of the record’s sound and spirit. Seemingly a play on the old adage that “This too shall pass,” Helm’s voice veers from commanding to supplicating within a single soulful verse as she manipulates that message so that light leads throughout even the darkest of times.
A lifelong musician and music-lover, Helm’s parents — The Band’s legendary drummer and singer Levon Helm and singer/songwriter Libby Titus — guided her training and influences. She later became a founding member of the alt-country collective Ollabelle and served as a backing musician in her father’s Midnight Ramble Band. And on “This Too Shall Light,” Helm said that two songs in particular pay homage to Levon — “The Stones I Throw,” a song he released in 1965 with Levon and the Hawks, and the closing traditional number, an a cappella version of the hymnal “Gloryland,” which was passed from father to daughter.
While “This Too Shall Light” is only Helm’s second album under her own name, it serves as a comprehensive portrait covering her life’s journeys and recoveries; they’re the stories that, no matter where they take her, seem to end and begin in the same place like a circle.
Helm will return to the 2019 main festival stage on Aug. 31 with a 6:30 p.m. set.

Photo courtesy FolkWest
The Mammals will take the stage of the Four Corners Folk Festival on Aug. 30 at 8 p.m.

The Mammals
A concert by The Mammals is healing and inspirational. It’s not only the magic of their combined voices; Ruth Ungar’s remarkably soulful grace and Mike Merenda’s hushed and intimate ease, it’s also the lyrics themselves that strike deep and spark smiles. Nominated for Song of the Year at the International Folk Music Awards, the title track of their 2018 album “Sunshiner” is an instant full-room sing-along, with a chorus that honors the past while envisioning a bright future of green energy, and good, positive human collaboration: “Yes my daddy was a miner, but I’m gonna be a Sunshiner …”
The band’s quintet lineup features dynamic drummer Konrad Meissner and a rotating inner circle of their favorite bass and organ/piano players. The Mammals joke that they’re “too folk for the rock show” and “too rock for the folk show” but, in reality, they hit the critical emotional and sonic touchstones of both. Their performances are propelled forward by just the right amount of guitar grit, soothing harmony, barn-burning fiddle, retro grooves and storytelling savvy.
The Mammals’ 2019 live in-studio video release of “Ashokan Farewell” (written by Ungar’s fiddling father, Jay Ungar, and known as the theme for Ken Burns’ PBS Civil War series) was premiered by Folk Radio UK as the band made their official Celtic Connections debut in Glasgow.
A concert reviewer there called them “gently-mannered activists with well-crafted songs that successfully ask potent questions of politicians and raise issues to probe how we can improve the planet … with enjoyment of their music underpinning the approach overall.”
In a style learned from mentors like Pete Seeger, this band masterfully weaves instrumentals into the set to allow for dancing and to let the words sink in.
Having met in the dive bars of NYC’s Lower East Side “anti-folk” scene in 1998, Ruth Ungar and Merenda quickly surrendered to the magnetism of their musical and personal connection which has now lasted them through occasional solo tours, over a decade of touring as a duo, the first incarnation of The Mammals (which included founding member Tao Rodriguez-Seeger), the creation of their biannual festivals the Winter and Summer Hoot, and also marriage, parenthood and the predictably unpredictable evolution of the music business. They have responded to the inherent challenges by writing better and better songs, collaborating with their heroes, self-releasing singles and donating download sales to good causes, harnessing support through a growing Patreon community, and expanding their fanbase through constant touring and positive energy.
“A string band at the core, The Mammals augment their sound with drums and electric guitar to create a collectively harmonized howl as thrilling and rocking as any band currently subverting folk traditions” — No Depression.
“The Mammals are the finest young bluegrass/old-timey band in the country, the country-branch house band for the new weird America. They perform total energy, off-kilter folk that more resembles the twisted quirk of the Holy Modal Rounders than the clean jeans or alter-ninnies currently clawhammering banjos,” said Michael Simmons of LA Weekly.
You can catch The Mammals on the festival main stage on Aug. 30 at 8 p.m.
Tickets and additional information about the festival, including the main stage schedule and information on all of the artists, can be found online at www.folkwest.com. Volunteer applications are now available on the website and scheduling will begin soon, so potential volunteers are urged to apply as soon as possible.
The Four Corners Folk Festival is supported in part with matching funds from Colorado Creative Industries.

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The Earls of Leicester to close out 24th annual Four Corners Folk Festival http://www.pagosasun.com/2019/07/09/the-earls-of-leicester-to-close-out-24th-annual-four-corners-folk-festival/ Tue, 09 Jul 2019 11:00:21 +0000 http://www.pagosasun.com/?p=172328 By Crista Munro
Special to The PREVIEW
Fresh off a positively amazing Pagosa Folk ‘N Bluegrass festival in mid-June, FolkWest is pleased to begin sharing the biographies of the 14 performing artists at this year’s 24th annual Four Corners Folk Festival. The event — Pagosa Springs’ traditional end to the summer — will take place over Labor Day weekend, Aug. 30-Sept. 1, on Reservoir Hill.
The 2019 lineup includes Billy Strings, Amy Helm, Darrell Scott, Molly Tuttle, The Mammals, The East Pointers, Rob Ickes and Trey Hensley, JigJam, Lindsay Lou, Mile Twelve, Wild Rivers, Maybe April, The Arcadian Wild and this week’s featured band, the Earls of Leicester.
When bluegrass supergroup the Earls of Leicester formed in 2013, their mission was ambitious but exact: To preserve and promote the legacy of bluegrass legends Lester Flatt and Earl Scruggs, in hopes of reviving the duo’s music for longtime admirers and introducing a new generation to their genre-defining sound.
Within a year of releasing their self-titled debut, the Nashville-based six-piece far surpassed their own expectations, winning a Grammy Award for Best Bluegrass Album and earning six awards from the International Bluegrass Music Association. Now, with their first live album, the Earls of Leicester offer up a selection of songs that fully capture the pure joy and supreme musicianship that propel their every performance.
Recorded over two nights at Nashville’s CMA Theater, The Earls of Leicester bears a boundless vitality that makes songs from over a half-century ago feel irresistibly fresh. Throughout the recording, the band wholeheartedly channels the spirit of Flatt and Scruggs while allowing each member’s distinct charm and singular musicality to shine through. And though their unbridled passion instantly stirs up a freewheeling energy, a closer listen reveals the profound mastery of skill infused into each performance.
“This is the result of years and years of trying out different instruments, different string gauges, different techniques to try to create these sounds,” Jerry Douglas noted.
In that process, he added, the Earls of Leicester eventually dug up decades-old instruments in order to achieve the ideal texture and tone they were seeking.
“Everybody in the band plays something old,” said Douglas. “This music just sounds so much more true to form when it’s played on old instruments.”
For Douglas — a 14-time Grammy Award-winner who founded the Earls of Leicester and produces all their material — that approach builds on a lifelong dedication to studying the music of Flatt and Scruggs. Soon after hearing the Foggy Mountain Boys at age 7, he devoted himself to deconstructing their recordings, paying particular attention to the captivating dobro work of Josh Graves.
“I remember sitting by the record player and trying to figure out what Josh Graves was doing,” he said. “There was no one to teach me, so I just had to listen.”
Douglas attended a number of Flatt and Scruggs concerts as a kid and later played with each musician on separate occasions. Although his own prolific career as a musician and producer has kept him more than occupied over the years —including appearing on more than 1,600 albums, recording with the likes of Ray Charles, Dolly Parton and Elvis Costello — Douglas was unable to shake his vision of one day revisiting the music of Flatt and Scruggs.
“I probably could have stayed focused on everything else I’ve got going on, but this just haunted me,” he said.
As Douglas points out, the most crucial factor in forming the Earls of Leicester was replicating the lightning-in-a-bottle chemistry that long-fueled Flatt and Scruggs.
“I looked for years to find the group I needed for the alchemy to work,” he said.
In the end, Douglas landed on the lineup of Shawn Camp (Garth Brooks, Blake Shelton), Jeff White (Vince Gill, Loretta Lynn), Charlie Cushman (Jimmy Martin, Mel Tillis), Johnny Warren (son of Foggy Mountain Boys’ Paul Warren), and Barry Bales (Alison Krauss and Union Station) — and found himself beyond floored by their immediate synergy.
“I had to stop the band in the middle of the first song, because I was scared to keep going — it felt like Flatt and Scruggs were going to jump right out of the wall,” he said in reflecting on their first meeting. “I’d hoped it was going to be even half that good and it ended up just taking my breath away.”
With The Earls of Leicester arriving on New Year’s Day in 2014 — and later amassing its many accolades, including Album of the Year at the 2015 International Bluegrass Music Association Awards — the band released their acclaimed sophomore album, “Rattle and Roar,” in July 2016 and, at the 2017 IBMA Awards, took home the Entertainer of the Year prize for the third year in a row.
But for Douglas, the most rewarding aspect of the Earls of Leicester lies in playing for a live audience and witnessing their reaction firsthand.
“One of the biggest payoffs for me is playing this music for younger people and watching them fall in love with it,” he said. “And even better than that is having the older folks come up to me and tell me, ‘I never thought I’d get to hear that music again.’ That’s when I know when we’ve really done our job.”
On “Earls of Leicester Live,” that generation-spanning appeal is undeniable, with the band’s sheer delight and wonder as infectious as each indelible melody. And as the Earls of Leicester transport the audience into a much simpler era, the album ultimately fosters a tender connection with the past, a sense of promise for the future and a newfound solace in the present moment.
“This music conjures up my childhood —it drops me off into a kinder, gentler place and I think it should do that for everybody,” said Douglas. “When people come to see us, we want them to forget about the outside world and all the stress or strife that goes along with it and hopefully hold onto that feeling for a while even after the show’s over.”
The Earls of Leicester will close out this year’s festival with a 7:30 p.m. headline set on Sept. 1.
Tickets and additional information about the festival, including the main stage schedule and information on all of the artists, can be found online at www.folkwest.com. Volunteer applications will be available on the website soon.
The Four Corners Folk Festival is supported in part with matching funds from Colorado Creative Industries.

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Folk ‘N Bluegrass http://www.pagosasun.com/2019/06/14/folk-n-bluegrass/ Fri, 14 Jun 2019 16:36:15 +0000 http://www.pagosasun.com/?p=170652

SUN photos/Randi Pierce

The 14th annual Pagosa Folk ‘N Bluegrass festival took over Reservoir Hill last weekend with a combination of music, activities for kids, workshops, fun, sun and more. The festival featured 13 musical groups over three days.

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Pagosa Folk ‘N Bluegrass kicks off Friday http://www.pagosasun.com/2019/06/06/pagosa-folk-n-bluegrass-kicks-off-friday/ Thu, 06 Jun 2019 21:00:51 +0000 http://www.pagosasun.com/?p=169719

Photo courtesy Michael Pierce

By Crista Munro
Special to The PREVIEW
The 14th annual Pagosa Folk ‘N Bluegrass festival takes place this weekend, June 7-9, on Reservoir Hill.
Nearly a year in the planning, the event promises to deliver another amazing collection of live musical performances from the Del McCoury Band, Sierra Hull, The Travelin’ McCourys, Sam Reider and the Human Hands, Kate Lee and Forrest O’Connor, Old Salt Union, Dead Horses, Circus No. 9, Fireside Collective, Halden Wofford and the Hi*Beams, Bonnie and the Clydes, FY5, and Sugar and the Mint.
Music on the main stage kicks off at 4 p.m. on Friday, June 7, with sets from Bonnie and the Clydes, Fireside Collective, Kate Lee and Forrest O’Connor, and Sam Reider and the Human Hands. After that, the action moves to the late night stage at the Ponderosa Pavilion with sets from Bonnie and the Clydes, and Halden Wofford and the Hi*Beams, ending around midnight.

Photo courtesy Michael Pierce
Activities for all ages will be available at this weekend’s Pagosa Folk ‘N Bluegrass festival atop Reservoir Hill.

The Kids Tent gets warmed up on Friday with arts and crafts and face painting from 2 to 6 p.m. At 4 p.m., Andy the Juggler will perform his first show of the weekend.
Saturday’s main stage sets (in order) begin at 11:30 a.m. and feature FY5, Dead Horses, Halden Wofford and the Hi*Beams, Fireside Collective, Sam Reider and the Human Hands, and headliners The Travelin’ McCourys. The late night stage gets underway at the Ponderosa Pavilion right after that with performances from Circus No. 9 and Old Salt Union.
Saturday, June 8, will be jam-packed with fun at the kids tent with a free T-shirt giveaway at 10 a.m. for the first 150 kids 12 and under, upcycled arts and crafts and face painting from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., a juggling workshop (for kids of all ages) at noon and a performance by Andy the Juggler at 2 p.m. Children 12 and under get free festival admission when accompanied by an adult and all kids’ activities are free thanks to our generous sponsors.

Photo courtesy Michael Pierce
In addition to the main stage and late night music offerings, attendees of this weekend’s Pagosa Folk ‘N Bluegrass festival will have the opportunity to attend various workshops offered by artists.

The workshop tent gets going on Saturday with a 10 a.m. workshop discussion by FY5 talking about what happens at the PFB Jam Camp. At 11 a.m., Kate Lee and Alex Hargreaves will teach a fiddle workshop, followed by a class in bluegrass arrangements at noon taught by Fireside Collective. Dominick Leslie and Forrest O’Connor will host a mandolin workshop at 1 p.m. to wrap up the day at the workshop tent. These informal sessions are open to all festival attendees, regardless of musical ability (or lack thereof) and are offered at no additional cost.
The final day of the festival includes sets from Sugar and the Mint, Old Salt Union, Circus No. 9, Kate Lee and Forrest O’Connor, Sierra Hull, and headliner The Del McCoury Band on the main stage beginning at 11 a.m.
The Kids Tent will have more upcycled arts and crafts and face painting from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. plus Ruby Balloon creating balloon art for the kids from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. and one last show by Andy the Juggler at 2 p.m.
Sunday’s workshop tent schedule includes a songwriting workshop by Eric Richard Stone at 10 a.m., a bluegrass and newgrass workshop by Circus No. 9 at 11 a.m., a mandolin workshop taught by Sierra Hull and Ronnie McCoury at 1 p.m., a class in songwriting an arrangements with Sugar and the Mint at 2 p.m., and a bluegrass songwriting workshop taught by Old Salt Union at 3 p.m.

Photo courtesy Michael Pierce
The 14th annual Pagosa Folk ‘N Bluegrass festival takes place this weekend, June 7-9, on Reservoir Hill.

The festival campground opens at 11 a.m. on Friday, June 7. There will be art, merchandise and food vendors on site, as well as beer and wine available from festival sponsors. Pagosa Folk ‘n Bluegrass is an all-weather event, with a large tent for seating for more than 650 people in the shade and plenty of room on the meadow beyond for stretching out on a blanket or low chairs.
Pagosa Folk ‘n Bluegrass is supported with funding from Colorado Creative Industries to support cultural tourism. Additional information about tickets, schedules, FAQs and links to artists’ websites can be found at www.folkwest.com. Tickets can also be purchased by phone at 731-5582 and held at will call for pickup.

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The Travelin’ McCourys to headline at Pagosa Folk ‘N Bluegrass http://www.pagosasun.com/2019/05/31/the-travelin-mccourys-to-headline-at-pagosa-folk-n-bluegrass/ Fri, 31 May 2019 11:00:09 +0000 http://www.pagosasun.com/?p=169022

Photo courtesy FolkWest
Grammy-winning The Travelin’ McCourys will take to the stage of the Pagosa Folk ‘N Bluegrass festival as the Saturday night headliner at 7 p.m. on June 8.

By Crista Munro
Special to The PREVIEW
The 14th annual Pagosa Folk ‘N Bluegrass celebration is just a few weeks away, taking place June 7-9 right here on Reservoir Hill.
This year’s lineup features the top names in folk, bluegrass and Americana music, including the The Del McCoury Band, Sierra Hull, Sam Reider and the Human Hands, Kate Lee and Forrest O’Connor Band, Dead Horses, Old Salt Union, Circus No. 9, Fireside Collective, FY5, Halden Wofford and the Hi*Beams, Bonnie and the Clydes, Sugar and the Mint, and this week’s featured band: The Travelin’ McCourys, who won the 2018 Grammy Award for Best Bluegrass Album.
The Travelin’ McCourys do not stand still. They are on the road — and online — entertaining audiences with live shows that include some of the best musicians and singers from all genres. It’s always different, always exciting and always great music.
No other band today has the same credentials for playing traditional and progressive music. As the sons of bluegrass legend Del McCoury, Ronnie McCoury on mandolin and Rob McCoury on banjo continue their father’s work — a lifelong dedication to the power of bluegrass music to bring joy into peoples’ lives. And with fiddler Jason Carter and bassist Alan Bartram, the ensemble is loved and respected by the bluegrass faithful. But the band is now combining their sound with others to make something fresh and rejuvenating.
They recently played with the Allman Brothers at Wanee Fest and then brought the house down at Warren Haynes’ Annual Christmas Jam, an invitation-only Southern Rock homecoming. Their jam with the Lee Boys was hailed by many as the highlight of the evening, and once word of the live video hit the streets, sent new fans online to watch a supercharged combination of sacred steel, rhythm and blues, and bluegrass. They’ve also performed with Warren Haynes, Phish and have a tour scheduled with the aforementioned Lee Boys. Ronnie McCoury described it as “peanut butter and jelly.” It was just right.
The Travelin’ McCourys can push forward so far because their roots are so deep. The band has a confidence that only comes with having paid their dues with 20 years on the bluegrass road. Other groups and new fans hear this immediately — the tight rhythm, the soulful material and the confidence in taking bluegrass from the safety of the shore into uncharted waters.
Ronnie McCoury said, “We like to go in and play traditional bluegrass music the way we do it with Dad, but we also like to be able to step into situations where we can really stretch out. If we need to plug in, we’ll plug in. We’re open to anything.”
It’s that attitude, backed up by talent, that marks great musicians — traditional or progressive. The Travelin’ McCourys are 21st century musical pilgrims and adventurers. They’re onto something new, just like Bill Monroe was in the 1940s, but now we can see and hear that adventure live.
The Travelin’ McCourys will close the festival on June 8 with a 7 p.m. headline set on the main stage.
Pagosa Folk ‘N Bluegrass is a family-friendly, all-ages event. Children 12 and under do not require a ticket for admission when accompanied by an adult. There are still a few volunteer opportunities available; call 731-5582 for more information.
Information about tickets, volunteering, festival schedules and performers can be found at www.folkwest.com/folknbluegrass. Tickets can be ordered by phone by calling (877) 472-4672.
Pagosa Folk ‘N Bluegrass is supported in part with matching funds from Colorado Creative Industries, a division of the Colorado Office of Economic Development and International Trade.

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