— Subscribe to this topic on PagosaSUN.com
Home » Archives by category » Lifestyle » History » Pagosa’s Past (Page 6)

Hot springs and high hopes

Hot springs and high hopes

Daisy Opdyke Fitzhugh, who as a small girl moved with her family to Pagosa Springs in 1879, years later recalled the bathing routine. “We would go in the morning and…

Hot water and high hopes

Hot water and high hopes

When mining activities increased in the upper Animas River mining camps during the early 1870s, supporting communities sprouted in the lower Animas River Valley. Because the growing season was longer…

High hopes and hot water

High hopes and hot water

What did the Pagosa Hot Springs look like in 1878 before people commenced messing around with the natural contours? For our description, we again rely on the professional eyes of…

High hopes and hot water

I closed last week’s column with the important news in 1878 that the Army was getting ready to build a fort at Pagosa Springs. Why an Army fort at such…

High hopes and hot water

High hopes and hot water

I’ve completed writing about “Traipsin’, tradin’ and explorin’.” For our next subject, here comes “High hopes and hot water.” A trail-worn prospector bound for Baker’s Park camped near the Great…

Traipsin’, tradin’ and explorin’

As we ended last week’s column, most of the able-bodied men in the West had returned to the East and South to fight in the Civil War. Not surprisingly, the…

Traipsin’, tradin’ and explorin’

Traipsin’, tradin’ and explorin’

Last week in the latest of my series of columns describing the earliest explorers to visit the Pagosa Hot Springs, we featured Capt. John M. Macomb, a topographical engineer with…

Traipsin’, tradin’ and explorin’

I’ve been writing about early explorers in Pagosa Country. One of the earliest of those risk-takers gives us a description of the Pagosa Hot Springs in its virgin state before…

Traipsin’, tradin’ and explorin’

Traipsin’, tradin’ and explorin’

Last week we pointed out that slaves were the most lucrative trade products on the Old Spanish Trail between New Mexico and Los Angeles, Calif. Low-scale immigration from New Mexico…

Traipsin’, tradin’ and explorin’

Traipsin’, tradin’ and explorin’

We’ve been talking about trade practices circa 1830 along the Old Spanish Trail between New Mexico and California. I reported that as a usual practice, two hand-woven blankets from New…