Clubs – The Pagosa Springs SUN http://www.pagosasun.com The most trusted source for news and information about Pagosa Springs, Colorado. Thu, 30 Jul 2020 19:05:03 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.4.2 http://www.pagosasun.com/wordpress/wp-content/uploads/2020/04/cropped-sun-logo-512x512-1-32x32.jpg Clubs – The Pagosa Springs SUN http://www.pagosasun.com 32 32 Bird of the Week http://www.pagosasun.com/bird-of-the-week-144/ Sun, 02 Aug 2020 11:00:32 +0000 http://www.pagosasun.com/?p=207921

Photo courtesy Charles Martinez

This week’s Bird of the Week, compliments of the Weminuche Audubon Society and Audubon Rockies, is the blue grosbeak.

The male blue grosbeak (passerina caerulea) is a large, vibrantly blue bunting with an enormous silver-colored thick bill and chestnut wing bars. Similar to, but larger than, an indigo bunting, the blue grosbeak measures 5.5 to 7.5 inches in length with a wingspan ranging from 10 to 11 inches.

They are uncommon, but widespread, across most of the southern United States and northern Mexico, where they nest after migrating, primarily from Central America. The blue grosbeak may arrive to nest as late as July. The male mates with the cinnamon-colored female to often raise two broods in a season.

They build nests low in small trees, shrubs, and tangles of vines and briars, but like to be close to open areas or roads. Their compact nest is cup-shaped, woven with whatever is available: twigs, bark, rootlets, cotton rags, newspaper, string, snakeskin, leaves and grass. Their nests are heavily parasitized by cowbirds, who lay eggs in their nests.

The male sings a rich, warbling song which often alerts you to his presence before he is seen. These birds forage on the ground, in shrubs and in trees for seeds, insects, snails, spiders, grains and wild fruits.

Blue grosbeaks thrive in abandoned agricultural land and avoid suburban habitat. Here, they are most commonly seen in June and July in the Navajo Lake area. Their overall population is stable.

For information on future events, visit www.weminucheaudubon.org and www.facebook.com/weminucheaudubon/.

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Renew your Gray Wolves membership for ski pass discount http://www.pagosasun.com/renew-your-gray-wolves-membership-for-ski-pass-discount/ Sat, 01 Aug 2020 11:00:01 +0000 http://www.pagosasun.com/?p=208080 By Simon Fuger
Gray Wolves Ski Club

Current and prospective Gray Wolves Ski Club members are reminded that the deadline to renew your membership and be eligible for the discount on your Wolf Creek Ski Pass is Aug. 15. There can be no exceptions or extensions. 

The terms and conditions for the 2020 season pass have not been finalized by Wolf Creek Ski Area because of potential changes due to COVID-19. In previous years, in order to receive the full discount from the ski area, you had to purchase your season pass from the ski area between the end of September and the first week in October and you had to be a Gray Wolves member as of Aug. 15. 

For more information on the Gray Wolves Ski Club and to download the application form, please access our website at graywolfskiclub.com. Application forms and payment can be submitted electronically through the website. Application forms and a check for $15 per person can also be submitted by mail to Gray Wolves Ski Club, P.O. Box 2394, Pagosa Springs, CO 81147. The application form and check must also be received before Aug. 15. 

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Archuleta County Fair goes virtual http://www.pagosasun.com/archuleta-county-fair-goes-virtual/ Fri, 31 Jul 2020 11:00:57 +0000 http://www.pagosasun.com/?p=207891

Photo courtesy Jeff Laydon

By Shelly Cox
Archuleta County Fair Board

The 2020 Archuleta County Fair was not completely canceled by the Archuleta County Fair Board. In its resolution to cancel the fair, the board specified that it would deploy every resource it could to help the 4-H youth program and Livestock Committee run a successful 2020 fair focused on participants in 4-H projects and the Junior Livestock Sale. 

The fair board facilitated running fiber on the fairgrounds to ensure the 4-H leaders could stream the live events on Thursday and Friday to allow the general public to view and participate in the projects. 

The Livestock Kids have worked hard on their projects in the hopes of being able to provide a buyer with quality raised meat, and the Archuleta County Livestock Committee is dedicated to providing a venue in which these hardworking kids can showcase and sell their projects, a venue that ensures the safety of the kids, buyers and volunteers. 

The committee will be holding the Junior Livestock Auction online on Aug. 1 from 6 to 9 p.m. Join us on Saturday and bid on that grand champion turkey, rabbit, steer or whatever is your favorite and show your support for these kids who have raised these animals through this difficult year.

For details on how to preregister as a buyer, complete add-ons or to see show schedule, visit www.archuletacountyfair.com or call the Extension Office at 264-5931. 

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Bird of the Week http://www.pagosasun.com/bird-of-the-week-143/ Tue, 28 Jul 2020 11:00:07 +0000 http://www.pagosasun.com/?p=207696

Photo courtesy Charles Martinez

This week’s Bird of the Week, compliments of the Weminuche Audubon Society and Audubon Rockies, is the orange-crowned warbler.

For a warbler, the orange-crowned is remarkably plain. Its yellow-green coloration serves to hide it well deep within the oak and shrubs where it spends its time. Distinguishing marks of this small bird include a thin, pointy bill, faint eye line and broken eye ring, and faint breast streaks. Its orangish head patch is usually concealed.

Leaving early from its winter grounds in southern California, Mexico and the Caribbean, the orange-crowned arrives here in late April. It breeds in a wide range of habitats across the western states and into Canada and Alaska. This warbler nests on or near the ground on shady hillsides, and on the steep terrain of road cuts and canyons. It will tolerate other warbler and sparrow species nesting in its territory, but chases off competing orange-crowneds. Here, it is often found in the company of Virginia’s warblers.

The male sings a unique, rapidly trilled song, described by a local birder as sounding like a telephone ring. Chipping sparrows and juncos sing a similar trilled song. Breeding males in adjacent territories will learn and mimic each other’s song, forming song neighborhoods.

These birds mainly eat invertebrates which they uncover by poking through leaf litter, probing bark, and picking over leaves and buds. They will also dine on berries, fruits, seeds and plant galls, and visit the sapwells created by sapsuckers. Food supply, not day length, triggers fall migration, and orange-crowned warblers may stay longer and farther north than other warblers before heading south for the winter.

For information on future events, visit www.weminucheaudubon.org and www.facebook.com/weminucheaudubon/.

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Free weekly garden talk: ‘Harvesting and Storing, Part 1’ http://www.pagosasun.com/free-weekly-garden-talk-harvesting-and-storing-part-1/ Mon, 27 Jul 2020 11:00:41 +0000 http://www.pagosasun.com/?p=207699 By Leslie Wustrack
Pagosa Springs Community Gardeners

The Pagosa Springs Community Garden is sponsoring a free online educational series on gardening throughout the spring and summer months. Renowned expert Ron Chacey covers all topics related to gardening in the Pagosa Springs area. All gardening talks are free and accessible via computer or telephone 

On Wednesday, July 29, at 5:30 p.m., Chacey, the eminent regional vegetable grower and an original founder of the Pagosa Springs Community Garden, will present “Harvesting and Storing, Part 1.” 

The evening’s format begins with photos of Chacey’s personal garden and a discussion of what he is currently doing in his garden. An in-depth presentation on harvesting and storing vegetables will follow. 

Chacey stated, “These subjects are large and will require at least two or more weeks to cover.” 

Deciding when to pick each vegetable can be difficult; every vegetable exhibits unique indicators. The best methods of storage, short and long term, for each vegetable will also be discussed. If interested, viewers who have a particular vegetable that they’d appreciate Chacey discussing, are invited to email their requests to PagosaSpringsCommunityGarden@gmail.com. During Chacey’s talk, participants will be muted, but will be invited to send in questions on his presentation and on any gardening topic. 

An avid grower with seven decades plus of experience, Chacey is a believer in trial and error in all areas of gardening. Chacey believes that learning from mistakes is the foundation of successful gardening. 

The 5:30 p.m. free gardening talk will be held via Zoom or telephone. To join our email list and receive weekly talk information, please send an email to pagosaspringscommunitygarden@gmail.com. For the July 29 talk, please visit http://www.Facebook.com/PagosaSpringsCommunityGarden or email PagosaSpringsCommunityGarden@gmail.com for easy links to the talks. 

The Pagosa Springs Community Garden is located at the end of 5th Street on the San Juan River in downtown Pagosa Springs. Decades old, the garden is on land owned by the Town of Pagosa Springs and plots are granted to the town’s citizens free of charge. In 2017, the garden was rejuvenated by community volunteers with the assistance of local Pagosa Springs businesses. Raised beds and deer-out fencing were constructed with donated lumber. Soil amendments, fertilizers, seeds, plant starts, tools, hoses and other necessary items are all provided through the generosity of Pagosa Springs businesses. The Town of Pagosa Springs provides free water for the Pagosa Springs Community Garden. 

The Pagosa Springs Community Garden is free and open to all. Residents and town visitors are invited to stop by and enjoy the lovely space. 

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Pagosa Mountain Rotary Club http://www.pagosasun.com/pagosa-mountain-rotary-club-2/ Sun, 26 Jul 2020 11:00:09 +0000 http://www.pagosasun.com/?p=207776

Photo courtesy Cyndy Secrist

The Pagosa Mountain Rotary club presents a check for $1,000 to Pagosa Outreach Connection (POC). The money included matching funds from Rotary District 5470. The POC will use the funds for rent and utility assistance as needs have increased during the COVID-19 pandemic. Pictured, left to right: Isabel Vita, Department of Human Services; Ashley Wilson, Rise Above Violence; Leighton McNeal, Community United Methodist Church; and Cyndy Secrist, Ken Rogers and Doug Secrist, Pagosa Mountain Rotary Club.

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Pagosa Springs Habitat Hero Garden underway http://www.pagosasun.com/pagosa-springs-habitat-hero-garden-underway/ Fri, 24 Jul 2020 11:00:40 +0000 http://www.pagosasun.com/?p=207658

Photo courtesy Parker Seibold
Native plants await their new home in an Audubon Habitat Hero Garden. The Weminuche Audubon Society and Geothermal Greenhouse Partnership (GGP) are planting a native garden on GGP’s site in Centennial Park.

By Jean Zirnhelt
Weminuche Audubon Society

This month, we are planting a Habitat Hero demonstration garden at the Geothermal Greenhouse Partnership (GGP) site on the Riverwalk in Centennial Park. 

According to Audubon Rockies, “Birds need native plants to survive. By planting a bird-friendly garden, you can help reverse one of the biggest threats birds face: habitat loss. Native gardens not only provide food and shelter for birds, they conserve water and eliminate chemical fertilizers and pesticides. Filled with color and life, they make our communities healthier and more beautiful. Finally, bird-friendly gardens are places to connect to nature.” 

This week, members of the Southwest Conservation Corps are working at the site to install protective fencing and ready the garden for planting. This effort is made possible through a GOCO grant submitted through the Town of Pagosa Springs by the GGP, and through funds contributed by the GGP and Weminuche Audubon Society.

Next week, we have several exciting events planned to learn the importance of native plants for birds and people. On Monday, July 27, Jamie Weiss, Audubon Rockies’ Habitat Hero coordinator, will demonstrate the importance of restoring our communities, one garden patch at a time, in a free online Habitat Hero workshop. This event takes place from 2 to 4 p.m. and advance registration is required. 

You will also have the chance to hear from representatives of local partners in the project, GGP, Weminuche Audubon Society (WAS), Audubon Rockies, CSU Extension Master Gardeners and Mountain High Garden Club. Community volunteers will be placing plants in the garden on Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday (July 28, 29 and 30). 

We will be working in small groups and following safe practices as directed by the state of Colorado. Advance registration to participate in the plantings is required. 

The plants have been purchased using grant funds awarded to the WAS through the National Audubon Society by the Coleman and Susan Burke Center for Native Plants. This effort is just the beginning of a long-term project to create a beautiful, educational garden for the enjoyment of residents and visitors of Pagosa Springs and our pollinator friends.

WAS members are excited to honor the memory of Mrs. Terry Hershey with this garden. She was instrumental in the formation of our local Audubon chapter in 2007.

Many local students have experienced environmental education field trips to her beautiful Fourmile Ranch due to her generosity in supporting youth education. She was an active voice in the conservation movement both here and in Texas.

We will wrap up the week’s activities with a free online movie. You won’t want to miss “Hometown Habitat” on Thursday evening, July 30, from 7 to 9 p.m. The movie features renowned entomologist Dr. Douglas Tallamy, whose research, books and lectures on the use of non-native plants in landscaping, sound the alarm about habitat and species loss. Advance registration is required for this movie.

Further information and registration links are available on the Events tabs on our website, www.weminucheaudubon.org. Questions may be directed to weminuche.audubon@gmail.com.

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Bird of the Week http://www.pagosasun.com/bird-of-the-week-142/ Tue, 21 Jul 2020 11:00:57 +0000 http://www.pagosasun.com/?p=207287

Photo courtesy Charles Martinez

This week’s Bird of the Week, compliments of the Weminuche Audubon Society and Audubon Rockies, is the Virginia’s warbler.

The “Virginia” in this bird’s name has nothing to do with location. It’s range is limited to the southwest, breeding most commonly in Nevada, Utah, Colorado, Arizona and New Mexico, and spending winters in thorn scrub and deciduous forests in the mountains of Mexico. According to Partners in Flight, this warbler has experienced a population decline of 46 percent in the last 50 years for reasons not well understood.

The Virginia’s warbler breeds in pinyon-juniper or oak forests with scrubby, steep slopes. Its nest is built on the ground and subject to cowbird parasitism. During breeding season, they are generally found only in pairs, but during migration and in winter, they live in mixed species flocks with other warblers.

Virginia’s warblers are gray overall with bright yellow patches on the chest and under the tail. A bright, white eye ring and thin, pointy bill are characteristic. Males, and sometimes females, have a patch of chestnut-colored feathers on top of the head, but these are not always displayed.

Males sing on their breeding grounds, but by mid-July songs cease and only contact “chip” calls are heard. These birds don’t sit still for long, hopping from branch to branch within a shrub while wagging their tails. Here they pick insects and spiders from deciduous vegetation. Virginia’s warblers never occur in coniferous forests without deciduous trees.

Forest management practices which remove the shrubby understory have negative impacts on nesting sites.

For information on future events, visit www.weminucheaudubon.org and www.facbook.com/weminucheaudubon/.

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Native Plants Garden, Habitat Hero Workshops and Solar Array to enhance GGP http://www.pagosasun.com/native-plants-garden-habitat-hero-workshops-and-solar-array-to-enhance-ggp/ Fri, 17 Jul 2020 11:00:25 +0000 http://www.pagosasun.com/?p=207514 By Sally High and Keith Bruno
Geothermal Greenhouse Partnership and Weminuche Audubon

The Geothermal Greenhouse Partnership (GGP) is undertaking three exciting projects on the Centennial Park site in July. Pagosa Springs’ Riverwalk promises to be a busy place as improvements are added for the benefit and enjoyment of the public. By mid-August, the park enhancements should be completed with the help of several partnering organizations.

Native plants garden

The GGP is building a native plants garden in collaboration with Weminuche Audubon Society and Southwest Conservation Corps (SWCC). Garden fence construction begins Monday, July 20, when Colorado Youth Corps brings youth workers to Pagosa Springs for two weeks of park improvements.

The 42-foot round fence and garden construction result from a Great Outdoors Colorado (GOCO) grant that the GGP submitted through the Town of Pagosa Springs. Materials are paid for with existing GGP and Weminuche Audubon funds. The youth workers will complete their site improvements and participate in local learning activities on July 31.

Solar energy installation 

GGP received a La Plata Electric Association Renewable Generation Funds Grant for construction of a solar array to generate electricity for the GGP site. An active solar generation system is being installed.

Habitat Hero workshops

Weminuche Audubon received a National Audubon Society Coleman and Susan Burke Center for Native Plants grant to plant a native plant garden for demonstration and education of the public. The GGP is proud to partner with Audubon and provide the site for the permanent demonstration garden.

Beginning Monday, July 27, local partners join Audubon Rockies to host native plants workshops free to the public. 

Jamie Weiss, Audubon Habitat Hero coordinator, will teach a Habitat Hero virtual orientation workshop about the importance of bird-friendly native plants and preserving our local biodiversity. The online workshop is from 2 to 4 p.m. and registration is required: https://rockies.audubon.org/events/pagosa-springs-habitat-hero-project.

Hands-on workshops continue Tuesday, July 28, when volunteers will assist in planting the native plant Habitat Hero garden on the GGP site. The end of the week brings a special movie, “Hometown Hero,” to be shared online.

Community-minded Pagosa Springs organizations are encouraging responsible behaviors to keep each other safe during the COVID-19 pandemic. We are determined to complete our planned hometown improvements by encouraging outdoor activity, social distancing and face coverings. 

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Free weekly garden talk: successive sowing and garden planning http://www.pagosasun.com/free-weekly-garden-talk-successive-sowing-and-garden-planning/ Mon, 13 Jul 2020 11:00:13 +0000 http://www.pagosasun.com/?p=206943 By Leslie Wustrack
Pagosa Springs Community Gardeners

The Pagosa Springs Community Garden is sponsoring a free online educational series on gardening throughout the spring and summer months. 

Renowned expert Ron Chacey covers all topics related to gardening in the Pagosa Springs area. All gardening talks are free and accessible via computer or telephone 

On Wednesday, July 15, at 5:30 p.m., Chacey, the eminent regional vegetable grower and an original founder of the Pagosa Springs Community Garden, will discuss extending your growing season with successive sowing coupled with garden planning. 

The evening’s format begins with photos of Chacey’s personal garden and an instructional video, and he will discuss what he is currently doing in his garden. An in-depth presentation on best practices of garden planning and the type of vegetables appropriate for mid-summer successive sowing for a vegetable garden will follow. All participants will be muted, but will invited to send in questions on his presentation and on any gardening topic. 

An avid grower with seven decades plus of experience, Chacey is a believer in trial and error in all areas of gardening. Chacey believes that learning from mistakes is the foundation of successful gardening. 

The 5:30 p.m. free gardening talk will be held via Zoom or telephone. To join our email list and receive weekly talk information, please send an email to pagosaspringscommunitygarden@gmail.com. For the July 15 talk, please visit http://www.Facebook.com/PagosaSpringsCommunityGarden or email PagosaSpringsCommunityGarden@gmail.com for easy links to the talks. 

The Pagosa Springs Community Garden is located at the end of 5th Street on the San Juan River in downtown Pagosa Springs. Decades old, the garden is on land owned by the Town of Pagosa Springs and plots are granted to the town’s citizens free of charge. In 2017, the garden was rejuvenated by community volunteers with the assistance of Pagosa Springs businesses. Raised beds and deer-out fencing were constructed with donated lumber. Soil amendments, fertilizers, seeds, plant starts, tools, hoses and other necessary items are all provided through the generosity of Pagosa Springs businesses. The Town of Pagosa Springs provides free water for the Pagosa Springs Community Garden. 

The Pagosa Springs Community Garden is free and open to all. Residents and town visitors are invited to stop by and enjoy the lovely space. 

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