Library volunteers party while cleaning up the shelves

Every Dec. 31, library volunteers help your library start the new year in the tidiest, cleanest way possible by taking every book, magazine, DVD, CD and video off the shelves and checking them to see if they need repairs.

The shelves are then cleaned and the materials fixed before they go back on the shelves in the proper place, in pristine condition, waiting for you to come to take them home to enjoy them.

Knowing that people work harder and happier when they are well fed, library staff cook a delicious breakfast and lunch for the volunteers while they go about their tasks. There’s also much laughter and visiting going on, as volunteers and staff enjoy each other’s company.

This annual housecleaning day is just one of many important services provided by our 55 volunteers, without whom we could not run the library. We average about 15-20 volunteers a month, who help us with crucial tasks to keep the library functioning well and our customer service top-notch.

There are two things you can do to help keep our books and other materials in good condition. First, don’t let your children peel off the bar codes that identify the materials for our computer system. We know kids love stickers, but without the bar code we can’t keep track of our collection. Secondly, don’t cut the jacket covers off the books. We are amazed at how often this happens. Those jacket covers are important because they are there to protect the books. You don’t need to worry that they carry germs, because we wipe each cover with a disinfectant every time any borrowed item is returned.

If you would like to help make sure our library remains an active and vital part of our community, please join our team. To volunteer, call the director, Jackie Welch, at 264-2208.

You also can support the library by joining the Women’s Civic Club (contact Jennifer Hedrick at 731-5835) or Friends of the Library (contact Sharee Grazda at 731-0666).

Books for teens

New books for seventh graders and older: “The Tales of Beedle the Bard” is an inside look at wizarding for Muggles by J.K. Rowling, author of the Harry Potter series. “Thirty Days Has September” is an entertaining and informative guide to help you remember stuff. “Failure” is a new collection of poems by Philip Schultz.

Book for pre-teens

New books for third through seventh grades: “Zany Miscellany” bills itself as a mixed-up encyclopedia of fun facts.

We also have three books in the Encyclopedia Brown super sleuth mystery series: “Cracks the Case,” “Case of the Midnight Visitor” and “Solves Them All.”

Books for youngsters

New books for kindergarten through third grade: “Boy, Were We Wrong About the Solar System” by Kathleen V. Kudlinski and John Rocco looks at the mistakes, mishaps and creativity that are part of scientific discovery. “1001 Things To Spot Long Ago” is a picture book filled with puzzles to solve.

Board books for toddlers

New board books — meaning they are sturdy enough to be handled by young children — include “Teeth Are Not For Biting” by Elizabeth Verdick, “Goldfish” from the My First Pets Board Book series, “Find the Duck” and “Head, Shoulders, Knees and Toes.”

Reading to babies

“Whose Nose and Toes” by John Butler has babies and toddlers guessing whose nose and toes from a variety of wildlife are pictured on each page.

Mysteries

“Blood Memory” by Margaret Coel is the latest in the Wind River Reservation mysteries series. “Snake Dreams” by James D. Doss is another in the Charlie Moon mystery series.

Art and spirituality

“Fearless Creating,” a step-by-step guide to starting and completing your work of art by Aric Maisel, is aimed at writers, visual artists, musicians, actors and creators in any field.

“God Is No Laughing Matter” by Julia Cameron offers spiritual straight-talk to help readers focus their spiritual experience and recognize true inspiration.

“Wherever You Go There You Are” by Jon Kabat-Zinn provides mindfulness meditation for everyday life.

Thanks to our donors

For their generous donations, we are grateful to John Hanna and Rowan Emrys, as well as Barbara Lindley. For books and materials this week we thank Mable Barber, Diane Burnett, Cherie Clodfelter, Chrissy Karas, Sheila Lane, Patty Latham, Paul Matlock, Tamsin Rohrich, Tasha Smith and Margaret Soniat.