Recall group misses deadline

A group intent on ousting Archuleta County Sheriff Pete Gonzalez via recall election missed a key procedural deadline last week, according to the county clerk, thus tanking their most recent recall effort and forcing them, if they choose to persist, to start the petition process from scratch.

“We thought they’d call and give us an excuse, but we haven’t heard anything,” said Archuleta County Clerk June Madrid,

Madrid said the deadline to submit the recall petition was Aug. 5, but due to a clerk’s office document dating error, Madrid gave the recall committee until 4 p.m. Aug. 7 to gather the 903 signatures and submit the paperwork to her office.

Madrid said the petitions never arrived.

Madrid said the recall committee, comprised of Galen Erin, Homer (Mack) Trout and Charles Michael Thomas, had neither called nor provided her or her staff with an update on the number of signatures gathered.

Erin is currently embroiled in a civil suit against Gonzalez and Archuleta County Undersheriff John Weiss.

Madrid said the missed deadline Aug. 7 marks the committee’s fourth unsuccessful attempt to recall Gonzalez.

When asked what the group’s next step was, Erin, the committee’s media contact, did not provide comment by press time.

Nevertheless, while it remains unclear what the recall committee will do next, Madrid said it is absolutely clear that the next recall push — if one should come — will require a special election, which, according to a recall committee document, runs contrary to their stated intent.

According to a letter from the committee to Madrid dated May 30, 2008, their intent was to time the petition process such that the recall question would appear on the general election ballot. The move, they said, would eliminate the need for a $30,000 to $40,000 special election, and was pursued “out of consideration for the convenience and financial well-being of Archuleta County voters and taxpayers.”

The May 30 assertion however, runs contrary to a committee statement dated April 14, 2008, which said Gonzalez’s transgressions were so egregious that it was worth the additional cost to the taxpayer to have him removed from office.

“ ... we assert that the life, liberty and financial well-being of each and every citizen and business in Archuleta County is infinitely more valuable than the alleged cost of the recall of Peter L. Gonzalez,” the recall committee press release states.

According to Madrid, recalling an elected official is a two-step process. First, the recall committee must gather sufficient signatures to put the recall question on the ballot. Then, if the petition succeeds, the question to recall the official in question is placed on the ballot for the electorate to decide.

Sen. candidate Schaffer to visit Pagosa

Bob Schaffer, Republican candidate for the U.S. Senate, will be in Pagosa Springs Aug. 18.

Schaffer faces off against Democratic challenger Mark Udall for the open Senate seat created by Republican Wayne Allard’s forthcoming retirement.

Allard has served in the Senate since 1996, and said early in his first term that he would serve just two terms in office. Hence, with his second term nearly up, Allard is following through on his pledge and will step down.

Schaffer will host a “meet and greet” event for Pagosa area Republicans at Boss Hogg’s Restaurant on Aug. 18 at 6 p.m. Boss Hogg’s is located at 157 Navajo Trail Drive.


PS to Gov: ‘Just send money’

A representative of the Governor’s Commission on Community Service (GCCS) visited Pagosa Aug. 7 to conduct a forum at the Pagosa Springs Community Center and seek input on issues and concerns in the area. Janet Mickish, coordinator for the GCCS, spoke to about 80 representatives from various volunteer and nonprofit organizations in the community. The forum was sponsored by United Way.

According to Mickish, the commission is seeking input from areas outside of the Denver Metro area, and communities “traditionally underserved by the state government.” The purpose of the GCCS is to “serve as a catalyst for the promotion and expansion of community service and volunteerism ...” according to documents provided. Mickish said she had visited Lamar and Grand Junction and was planning to visit Cortez on Friday.

“It’s important at the state level that we don’t have a ‘one size fits all’ solution,” said Mickish. “Working at the community level is a huge key.”

Mickish asked the 80 plus attendees what issues they thought our community is currently facing, and everything from childcare, lack of jobs, conservation of open space, affordable housing, and public transportation was brought up. As one audience member said, “It’s a great place to retire, but a tough place to make a living.

Mary Jo Coulehan commented that Pagosa is “a community with great resources, but it needs more vision.”

Mickish asked to what extent people are involved in the community, and if there are volunteering opportunities at every socioeconomic level.

“They’re all in this room,” said one audience member. “You don’t get younger blood. They’re working two or three jobs, with a family, and don’t have the time.”

The general consensus in the room seemed to be that volunteer organizations in town need to collaborate more instead of working as “islands” unto themselves.

“We’re doing an excellent job as it is, but we can do better,” said Lisa Scott. “If we sit back and think it’s going to get solved by the government, we’re wrong.”

At the end of the forum, Coulehan asked Mickish what exactly would come of the forum. Mickish replied that the information gathered would be compiled and used to create a needs assessment, which would then be used to identify the resources and help that is needed in Pagosa.

As far as the resources that are needed and will be distributed to Pagosa? “I don’t know yet,” said Mickish in an telephone interview Monday. “We’re looking for solutions, and to enhance our understanding of the problems in each community. But we don’t know what those resources might be.”

At the forum, when asked what resources Pagosa needs, one audience member replied, “Just send money!”

And indeed, Mickish said on Monday, money may certainly be one of the resources distributed across the state.

“We’re open to a wide variety of resource opportunities,” she said.

According to Mickish, the results of the needs assessment will be ready by mid December. The results can be viewed at www.colorado.gov/GCCS.

School board considers four-day school week

The possibility of shortening the school week from five days to four was a main topic during an Archuleta County School District 50 Joint school board work session Tuesday.

If implemented, students and teachers would have a three-day weekend, with no classes on Fridays.

With declining enrollment and a dwindling budget continuing to be a thorn in the district’s side, Superintendent Mark DeVoti said the four-day school week cropped up as a solution to cut costs.

“We’re taking a serious look at this,” DeVoti said in an interview Wednesday. “It could be a solid answer for our current problems.”

Closing the schools for an extra day each week would cut the expenses on transportation, electricity, heating, food service, maintenance, and just general wear and tear, said DeVoti. A 20 percent decrease in costs for bus fuel alone would be a boon to the district, he said, since last year $120,000 was spent to fuel the school’s fleet.

Colorado law requires school districts to schedule 1,080 hours per year for class time; this usually amounts to six hours per day for 180 days.

Archuleta County district currently runs for 167 days, with seven hours per day of instructional time. DeVoti said shaving Friday off the schedule would most likely result in about 40 minutes added to each school day, for an approximate schedule of 8 a.m. to 4 p.m.

According to material issued by the Colorado Department of Education, concerns surrounding childcare come out as “a wash,” since children tend to arrive home around the same time as their parents, and the latchkey issue becomes less prominent. Also, the extra day can be used to rest and recover from the school week, as well as for more family and recreation time.

DeVoti said the extra day off would also be beneficial to teachers, as it could be used for more planning and collaborative time, as well as “giving them a real weekend with their families.

“You can’t put a dollar amount on it,” said DeVoti. “But there are some things that are more important, like staff satisfaction.”

The four-day school week will be a discussion item at the board meeting Sept. 9.

More information on the four-day school week can be found at www.cde.state.co.us.


Lodging tax receipts in Pagosa Springs down nearly 8 percent

The Town of Pagosa Springs saw a dip in lodging tax revenues during the first half of this year. Relative to the same period last year, January through June, those revenues are down 7.74 percent.

Reasons for the drop in tax revenues are unclear. Although gas prices jumped to well over $4 a gallon earlier in the summer and that price increase can be correlated to a decrease in travel (a 4.7 percent nationwide decline in June, with about a 7 percent average decline throughout western U.S. states), the largest drops in local lodging tax receipts occurred during the months of February and April, months not traditionally associated with boom tourism.

Lodging tax collections dropped 15.36 percent in February compared to the same month in 2007, from $20,543 collected last year to $17,388 this year. In April 2008, receipts were down 16.97 percent relative to collections the same time last year, dropping from $15,879 last year to $13,185 in 2008.

Lodging receipts for May (the month that traditionally kicks off the Pagosa Springs tourist season) were down just 1.87 percent from last year, from $20,590 last year to $20,204 this year. However, June receipts fell 8.3 percent, from $31,804 in 2007 to $29,163 in 2008. Figures for July 2008 tax receipts were not available as of press time.

The only month in 2008 that showed an increase was January, with an increase of 2.93 percent. However, it is unclear how much of that increase, if any, was due to stranded lodgers stuck in Pagosa Springs during a series of storms that hammered the area during the first month of the year.

Although the drop in lodging tax revenues are in line with decreases felt across the western U.S., Dianne Calderon, executive director of the Pagosa Springs Town Tourism Committee, did not have a pat explanation for why receipts are down in Pagosa Springs in 2008. “Some of the receipts are down because smaller properties were renting long-term versus short-term,” explained Calderon, adding that, by statute, taxes cannot be collected when a lodger stays over 30 days.

Asked if the long-term lodging stays could be tied directly to the local housing market, Calderon stated that long-term lodging is often used as transitional housing while people are in the process of moving. When asked if the lodgers were staying long-term while waiting for housing to become available, Calderon was less than optimistic: “Unfortunately, I think it’s the opposite, people are moving out.” However, Calderon stated that non-taxable lodging probably only accounted for a .5 to 1 percent drop in 2008 lodging tax receipts.

It will be several months before a clearer picture emerges concerning how the remainder of the summer shapes up for local motels and how their business will affect tax receipts. If the Pagosa Springs numbers remain on par with numbers from the rest of the West, the town could be looking at a continuing drop in these revenues.


Salazar discusses healthcare at town hall meeting

While hosting a town hall meeting at the Pagosa Mountain Hospital in Pagosa Springs last Friday, U.S. Sen. Ken Salazar described our nation’s healthcare system as badly broken and in dire need of repair.

For half an hour, the senator spoke to an overflowing room of area citizens, officials and healthcare practitioners, then addressed questions and comments regarding healthcare and other matters important to attendees. He began by briefly explaining three national interests that occupy much of his time in the Senate, including war and peace, energy and healthcare.

Though these topics are among the most pressing of our time, the senator failed to highlight the current state of our national economy, which, by most general polls, clearly tops the list of contemporary concerns.

Nevertheless, Salazar expressed his belief that the U.S. should remain strong on defense and security. He said the Iraq war would probably end “in a year or so,” when coalition leaders finally relinquish command to the Iraqi government.

Regarding energy, Salazar emphasized the tremendous strain high fuel costs are imposing on all levels of government, law enforcement, business and consumers. To ease the pain, he suggested finding ways to reduce speculation costs, while increasing supply by releasing oil from the country’s strategic reserve. He recommended everyone exercise smarter, fuel-efficient driving habits, while leaders work toward a “comprehensive agenda on energy independence.”

Even as Salazar described a clear path to settling war and energy issues, he proclaimed healthcare the most difficult of modern American challenges.

“This ‘great healthcare system’ in America is a myth,” he said. “We must puncture that myth because the system is broken.”

Utilizing a series of colorful charts, the senator illustrated how the U.S. healthcare system is the most expensive among many industrialized nations. According to the visual aids, our system ranks the highest in preventable deaths, while the average life expectancy is in the lower half of all developed nations. Infant mortality, meanwhile, is twice that of our peers.

The senator pointed out that 48 million Americans have no insurance or access to healthcare, while another 25 million are seriously uninsured. For those with healthcare coverage, average family premiums exceed $12,000 annually. Self-employed consumers pay between $1,000 and $2,000 a month for adequate coverage, while a full 20 percent of Americans forgo necessary care, because they simply can’t afford it.

While the senator’s concerns sounded eerily similar to those expressed by innumerable politicians and elected officials over the years, so too, seemed the broad solutions he offered.

To fix healthcare, as one of the senator’s charts stated, we must control increasing costs and find a way to provide health insurance for all Americans. We should convert to electronic medical records — as the Veterans Administration is now doing — and we must focus on nutrition and disease prevention. To reduce waste, we must empower the people to pay for what works, because, according to Salazar, 30 percent of the nation’s Gross Domestic Product is attributed to healthcare costs.

Through his soft and always affable approach, the senator acknowledged, “It’s easy to talk about universal healthcare and talk about some of the bills that we have, but how we get from here to there is another challenge.” He confessed that many bills now before Congress only address certain pieces of the puzzle, while a true reform package could come in the first six months of a new administration.

The senator talked of how he and other leaders are fighting for better consumer access to healthcare, and pointed to recent improvements in the Medicare and Medicaid systems. While mentioning legislation that now provides greater coverage to children, he agreed that people need better insurance information, a viable connection to local resources and a better education on how to choose end-of-life care.

In the final half hour, Sen. Salazar opened the meeting to questions and comments.

One comment touched on the need to recruit more primary care physicians, while moving away from a system so heavily dependant on specialists. Such a system dramatically increases doctor reimbursements, further contributing to skyrocketing healthcare costs.

Other comments compared the U.S. military medical system to universal healthcare, where anyone sick or injured moves through a tiered level of practitioners without going directly to a specialist. Some likened it and modern Medicare to socialized medicine.

Attending physicians expressed concern over malpractice liabilities and litigation, and Sen. Salazar agreed.

“Concerns of malpractice are real and must be dealt with,” he said. “There are a lot of administrative inefficiencies and billing complexities are a problem.”

When an audience member asked about state government involvement, the senator acknowledged states’ efforts, but said they can’t deal with the issue alone.

“It’s too big,” he said, “It’ll take a national effort.”

Salazar explained how Medicare, Medicaid and insurance programs directed at children now cover 100 million people, but complained that President Bush has failed to put healthcare on the nation’s agenda.

“Personally, I like President Bush,” he said, “but his healthcare policies are wrong for America. He vetoed some important bills twice, but this election will end a lot of that. We need to pull the pieces together on a national level.”

When someone mentioned that Singapore appeared to have the best healthcare system in the world, Salazar agreed that we could learn a lot from what other countries have done.

“We’re looking at a lot of those other systems,” he conceded. “We’re beginning a dialog and framework for a new system, then we’ll try and craft it through legislation.”

When asked about the serious lack of dental and mental healthcare coverage in our society, the senator again acknowledged a need for greater attention, and promised to look into reforming those systems.

Meanwhile, one retired physician and health district board member suggested that many foreign healthcare systems “are not what they’re cracked up to be.” He insisted many of our health issues are of our own making.

“We eat, drink and smoke too much,” he said.

“We need to put the weight back on the people.”

Again, the senator agreed, saying we need to educate people about the benefits of regular exercise, proper diet and overall lifestyle.

Certainly, healthcare is an incredibly complex issue in our society, and the answers to its many tribulations won’t come easily. But Sen. Salazar promised those attending Friday’s meeting that he and other congressional leaders from both sides of the isle will continue working until meaningful reform is eventually realized.

As always, we’ll have to wait and see.

PAWSD reports ‘bleeps’ but overall good financial health

Despite shortfalls in two key revenue streams, a second-quarter financial report indicates the Pagosa Area Water and Sanitation District remains on solid financial ground, according to one of the agency’s key financial managers.

“Operating revenues are up and doing well. We’ve got a few bleeps in operating expenditures but we’ll monitor them. I think private businesses are going through the same thing. We’ll try to make sure we maintain capital and get ready for a long haul if that’s what it (the national and local economic downturn) turns out to be,” said Shellie Tressler, assistant finance manager for the Pagosa Area Water and Sanitation District.

Tressler said operating revenues are dollars used to fund PAWSD’s day-to-day expenses such as payroll and other employee related costs, utility bills for PAWSD facilities and a variety of other expenses. Operating revenues, said Tressler, include dollars generated from service fees, water sales, irrigation water sales, customer hook-ups among other items.

In addition to a solid inflow of operating revenues, Tressler said PAWSD holds about $6 million in spendable reserves.

However, although “to-date” (June 30, 2008) operating revenues appear stable and roughly in line with budgeted amounts, the district still shows significant shortfalls on two line items earmarked for long term capital improvements.

According to the report, the district’s Water Resource Fee ($7,210 per equivalent unit) and the water component of the Capital Investment Fee ($2,575 per equivalent unit) are both far under budget for the period. For example, Water Resource Fee collections are at just 8.9 percent of the budgeted amount ($57,890 of $650,000 budgeted) while the water component of Capital Investment Fee collections are at just 18.9 percent or $66,116 of $350,000 budgeted. Both collection rates should hover at nearly 50 percent of the total budgeted amounts.

By contrast, at the end of the second quarter in 2007, Tressler said Water Resource Fee and Capital Investment Fee collections were also down, although collections by year’s end exceeded budgeted amounts.

Nevertheless, and despite last year’s year-end surge in collections, Tressler said district board members are anticipating less than stellar collections due to the national and local economic slumps.

“The district can anticipate that we’re not going to meet that budget this year. The whole economic situation will have to turn around before we see this revenue come in,” Tressler said.

In the meantime, Tressler said the board will have to reexamine the scheduling for certain capital projects (a standard practice, according to PAWSD manager Carrie Weiss), and the assumptions behind projects such as Dry Gulch, that were predicated on rapid population growth.

“We don’t have population coming in at rates we anticipated and we don’t have revenues coming in at rates we anticipated,” Tressler said. “We’ll have to keep our capital projects based on growth in pace with the actual growth we are experiencing.”

To that end, Tressler said the board is working toward obtaining an updated cost estimate for the Dry Gulch Reservoir project, (PAWSD documents put the total at about $150 million in 2006 dollars) and will enlist the help of a rate structure specialist to review PAWSD’s rates and will review the methodology, assumptions and growth projections used to justify Dry Gulch. The results of the work will help the district reprioritize capital projects based on more current data.

“We know we’re dealing with a changed economy, slower growth and costs that were outdated,” Tressler said.

Weiss said the PAWSD board will review and consider reprioritization of certain capital projects in September. In addition, Weiss said she anticipates having an updated cost estimate for the entire Dry Gulch project by Oct. 1 and the fee analysis project completed by the end of the year.

Lewis Street construction moves at good pace

Well into the second week of August, progress continues on the Lewis Street restoration project at an impressive pace.

Even with the complications of traditional late-afternoon rains (albeit a tame monsoon season) compounded by the necessity of replacing a gas main, construction on Lewis Street has proceeded well within the “aggressive deadlines” set by town staff and NORAA (the contractors charged with completing the project).

“Despite the rain, I think we’re doing pretty well,” said town construction manager Torry Hessman, adding, “They (NORAA) are doing an excellent job.”

What rain does fall not only has the potential for stopping work but also adds to the need for additional cleanup.

“Every time it rains, we have to get in there and ‘re-muck’ the materials,” said Hessman. When asked to define ‘re-mucking,’ Hessman stated it is the process of clearing water, mud and materials washed into an area by the rain that needs to be removed, “before we can get good fill material in there.”

Hessman was referring to the areas where sidewalk, brick work and other paving materials are being installed along Lewis Street. “NORAA has to conduct a compaction test before concrete can be poured,” Hessman continued. “We’re not just complying with code, we’re making sure that what gets poured lasts as long as possible.”

Relocating a gas main (as reported last week), although an unpleasant and unplanned obstacle, went better than anticipated, finishing three days ahead of schedule, and causing no noticeable delay to the project timeline. The intersection of 4th and Lewis streets was open for traffic by late Tuesday afternoon. Furthermore, Hessman reported that sidewalks on both sides of Lewis Street should be completed by the end of the week, on schedule.

Other, non-construction issues, create minor blips in the otherwise breakneck construction schedule. “We had a funeral at the Catholic church last Friday,” Hessman reported, “and everything went off without a hitch. There’s a funeral at the Methodist church on Saturday and I don’t foresee any problems. With good communication between us, the churches, the funeral homes, and the flower delivery people, we can meet the needs of the people residing on Lewis Street and keep things on schedule.” Hessman reported that, in order to accommodate the funerals, NORAA has been glad to readjust its schedule.

The next inconvenience to local residents should occur Monday, Aug. 18, when a portion of the intersection connecting 5th Street to Lewis Street will be shut down to join Lewis Street storm drainage to that along U.S. 160. According to Hessman, one side of the street at that intersection will be shut down for a day. “If everything stays on schedule, we should be working on that Monday and the road will be restricted to one lane for just that day.” Residents needing to get to and from 5th Street, County Road 400, and Cemetery Road are advised to use the 7th Street access to U.S. 160.

Major construction on the Lewis Street project will, if everything stays on schedule, reach completion on Sept. 10, with final phases ending Oct. 10.

Residents with questions or issues are encouraged to contact Hessman at 264-4151, Ext. 250.

Motorcycle helmets: The high cost of riding ‘free’

“Ride free or die!” could be a credo of some bikers groups advocating for nationwide, helmet-free motorcycle laws, but should wearing helmets be the choice of the riders or a mandate of law?

Currently Colorado is one of only a few remaining states that do not require operators and riders over age 18 to wear a helmet. Here are some food-facts for thought:

1. In a recent per-mile traveled study by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, a motorcyclist was approximately 37 percent more likely to die in a crash than someone in a car.

2. Head injuries are the number one cause of death in motorcycle crashes.

3. An un-helmeted motorcyclist is 40 percent more likely to suffer a fatal head injury in a crash than one who is helmeted.

4. Fatal motor vehicle crashes (including motorcycles), cost taxpayers (you and me) an estimated $26 billion annually in medical and other costs.

While it is perfectly legal in Colorado for those over age 18 to operate or ride without a helmet, the State Patrol advocates the wearing of helmets, and strongly encourages all operators and their passengers to helmet-up.

Opponents on either side of this argument will support their case with statistics, but as a road trooper for almost 17 years I’ll say from personal experience that in crashes I’ve investigated, those wearing helmets more often lived, and those not wearing helmets more often died. Period.

For safety’s sake, please wear a helmet.

Neighborhood Watch works in Arboles

Neighborhood Watch signs are being erected in Arboles neighborhoods to warn criminals that residents are watching them.

Archuleta County Sheriff Peter Gonzales says an Arboles group is currently the only active Neighborhood Watch in the county, but he would be willing to support other such groups in the county if requested. He has assigned John Weiss, the undersheriff, to work with the Arboles group, which meets every other month.

Dave Bohl, chairman of the local Republican Party, has expressed interest in starting more neighborhood watches elsewhere in the county.

The Arboles meetings at the Arboles Catholic Church attract 17 to 40 persons, and reports are received from the sheriff’s departments in both Archuleta and La Plata counties.

“We don’t just focus on crime,” said Kathleen Claussen, program coordinator. “We also keep track of fires, snow and flooding.”

Meetings are held at 7 p.m. on the last Tuesday of the month. The next meeting is set for September.

There are 210 phones on the Neighborhood Watch list and there are 18 block captains. “We have had strong support from the Southern Ute Police, represented by Don Folsom and Zack Rock,” says Claussen.

“Last year during the summer, we learned kids were firing guns late at night and some drug activity was reported. This activity has been cleaned up,” said Claussen.

“More recently, we have noticed patrol cars traveling Arboles at night. They are either from the Southern Ute Police or the Archuleta Sheriff’s Department,” she said. “Our territory includes Arboles, Allison and Tiffany.”

Meetings focus on crime prevention and have dealt with burglary prevention, recognition of meth abuse and substance abuse prevention.

Members of the group put up signs in different neighborhoods to warn those who are thinking about crime.

“The organization has proven to be a great way to get to know neighbors,” said Audrey Combs, one of the organizers of the watch group last summer.

The group also entertains other subjects of interest to safety-minded residents.

Drew Peterson of the county’s emergency preparedness office advises the group on flooding dangers.

“If we see a fire, we immediately contact the five-member fire department,” Claussen said.


Emergency Preparedness Fair Aug. 16

The public is invited to attend and participate in an Emergency Preparedness Fair Aug. 16 at the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints.

Exhibits and demonstrations directed at getting one prepared to face a disaster will be available for those who attend. Representatives of public safety agencies will be on hand to help provide information and answer questions; 72-hour emergency packs will be on display as will outdoor camping and wilderness survival exhibits. Members of the Pagosa Fire Protection District will be at the event to answer question about fire mitigation.

The church is also hosting an open house depicting the history of the church and information concerning God’s plan.

The event will be held between the hours of 10 a.m. and 2 p.m. Refreshments and snacks will be provided, and the event is free. The church is located at 1879 Majestic Avenue, behind the Ponderosa Do It Best store.

CDOT accepting applications for federal transit funds

The Colorado Department of Transportation (CDOT) is accepting applications for Federal Transit Administration (FTA) funds that will support a variety of transit activities in Colorado including transit technical assistance, planning, research, demonstration projects, special studies, training and other similar projects.  CDOT expects to receive approximately $305,600 for Fiscal Year 2009. 

The funds are made available in Colorado on an 80-percent federal, 20-percent local matching ratio.  Only public bodies are eligible applicants; however, interested private, nonprofit organizations may apply through a willing body where the non-profit is a sub-recipient.  In addition, all projects must be initiated in the 2009 calendar year.

The projects will be prioritized by CDOT according to the purpose of the project.  Statewide projects will be given first priority, followed by those projects that focus on local activities such as research, local transit operating plans, training projects and site development planning. 

Since the 2035 Statewide Plan has been adopted by the Transportation Commission and the planning requirements are already met in this document, CDOT does not anticipate funding projects that involve the regional transit plans.

“We are truly looking for projects that have statewide or local significance for the 2009 funding of this particular grant,” said CDOT Transit Planner John Valerio.  “Through this funding, we hope that cities, counties and transit organizations can expand on their planning efforts in order to initiate, increase, and improve transit service in the future.”  

Applications for this transit grant are due to CDOT by 5 p.m. Monday, Sept. 22.  Applications must be submitted online at www.dot.state.co.us/App_Transit/.  If you have specific questions about the grant or the application process, contact John Valerio at (303) 757-9769 or john.valerio@dot.state.co.us.

Armed Forces Support Coalition sponsors seminar

Military families, mental health professionals, educators, pastors and any interested individuals are invited to attend an educational seminar Saturday, Sept. 13, at Sky Ute Casino Conference Center in Ignacio, from 10 a.m.-3 p.m., check in at 9:30 a.m.

The event is sponsored by Armed Forces Support Coalition. The program will feature the Colorado Joint Family Support Assistance Program (JFSAP) based in Denver and will cover support available to military families, as well as mental health issues affecting veterans, such as post traumatic stress disorder and traumatic brain injury.

Space is limited, so R.S.V.P. is required before Sept. 1.

For more information or to R.S.V.P., contact AFSC at 247-9186 or susan@armedforcessupportcoalition.org.

Concert for Fine Arts Magnet Academy

Do you want to extend your enjoyment of the Four Corners Folk Festival while assisting local students?

FolkWest and The Infamous Stringdusters with Anne and Pete Sibley have agreed to put on a pre-festival benefit concert, and proceeds will go to the Pagosa Springs High School’s new Fine Arts Magnet Academy.

The concert will be at 7 p.m. Thursday, Aug. 28, in the Pagosa Springs High School auditorium. This is a high-energy, must-see group of musicians.

Pagosa Springs High School’s Fine Arts Magnet Academy (FAMA) is an addition to our high school’s offerings beginning this fall, and it includes curriculum and coursework in music, art, drama and video production.

Students who apply and are accepted to this program will be involved in master classes and several special learning opportunities and activities throughout the school year. The additional funds needed to run the academy come from a variety of sources, and this concert begins the fund-raising effort.

Attending The Infamous Stringdusters’ concert is a sure way to kick-start the Labor Day weekend and the Four Corners Folk Festival with great music and a great time.

All tickets are general admission and can be purchased at any of the following locations: The Pagosa Springs Chamber of Commerce, Moonlight Books or at www.brownpapertickets.com.

If you have a Four Corners wristband, your ticket is $10; all others are $15.

For further information, call 264-0264 or 264-2228.


Festival security volunteers needed

The Four Corners Folk Festival is still looking for people to join the security team at this year’s 13th annual event taking place Aug. 29-31 on Reservoir Hill.

 Security volunteers work a total of 12 hours throughout the weekend and receive a free three-day on-site camping ticket, T-shirt and home-cooked meals at the security tent all weekend long.

Organizers are looking for camp shuttle drivers who would drive a festival vehicle towing a trailer up and down Reservoir Hill on Thursday, Aug. 28, from 3-9 p.m. and Friday, Aug. 29 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.

Other positions involve checking wristbands, age verification at the beer garden and late-night rovers in the campground. No experience is necessary.

 An informational meeting will be held Saturday at 1 p.m.

If you are interested in learning more details about this fun opportunity, contact Bear Bolhouse at 264-5060.


Board and audience review student survey

The results of the Healthy Colorado Kids Survey are in, and board and audience members discussed the issues raised and proposed solutions at the Archuleta School District 50 Joint school board meeting Tuesday.

Anna Royer, prevention specialist with the Archuleta County High School, presented the results of the survey to the board and audience. The survey was given to students at Pagosa Springs High School, Pagosa Springs Junior High School, and Archuleta County High School. About 85 percent of students enrolled at the three schools, or 658 students, took the survey, a number Royer called “much higher than the norm.”

The survey consisted of eight categories ranging from substance abuse to delinquency, personal safety and sexual activity. Over 100 questions were asked to garner the results.

“I want you to remember,” said Royer, “that whatever we’re looking at, it’s a community issue, not just a school issue.”

Alcohol and marijuana topped the list of substances used by students, with 68 percent reporting use of alcohol at least once in their lifetime, and 40 percent reporting marijuana use. Forty percent reported tobacco use, 27 percent reported prescription drug abuse, 19 percent reported inhalant use, and 16 percent reported cocaine use. Ecstasy and methamphetamines were the least widely-used, with 9 and 7 percent of students reporting using the drugs at least once.

In the last 30 days prior to the survey, 56 percent of students reported they had not consumed alcohol, and 67 percent had not participated in binge drinking. Seventy-eight percent reported not smoking marijuana or tobacco in the last 30 days.

Royer called these “positive numbers,” but reminded the board and audience that there is a flip side to the coin.

“Fifty-six percent did not use alcohol in the last month,” she said. “But that means 44 percent did.”

Eighty-one percent of students reported they had not driven after drinking alcohol in the last 30 days, and 80 percent had not driven after smoking marijuana.

“But with the other 20 percent, that equals about four students per night driving while under the influence,” said Royer. “And in a community this size, that gives me pause.”

Fifty-two percent of high school age students reported having sexual intercourse at least once in their lifetime, and 20 percent reported they had consumed drugs or alcohol before the last time they’d engaged in sexual activity. These questions were not asked on the junior high survey.

“I think there’s a lot of education we can do to help decision making skills,” said Royer. “With the ability to make a decision, they feel they have agency.”

When asked the question “Have you ever been physically forced to have sexual intercourse when you did not want to,” 14 percent of high school age students answered in the affirmative.

Royer said sexual victimization is a very contended issue. “But regardless of how you would define that topic, it is a concern,” she said.

Twenty-six percent of students reported feelings of depression in the last year, 20 percent reported seriously considering suicide, and 12 percent reported attempting suicide in the last year.

Thirteen percent of students reported their boyfriend or girlfriend had purposefully hit, slapped, or physically hurt them in the last year.

According to Royer, support systems for mental health, sexual victimization, and substance abuse exist in the community, but they need to be made more visible.

Board member Ken Fox said the results of the survey felt “like a slug in the gut.”

The board agreed that the expansion of the Health and Wellness Committee (especially to include members of the medical field), possible peer support groups, and parental involvement are all factors that can help assuage the issues brought to light by the survey.

“Parental involvement makes preventative programs more successful,” said Royer. “And we have parents who care.” Many of the problems are interwoven, she said, and the results of the survey can be used to help secure grants for preventative programs and support groups.

“We need to develop a comprehensive approach to prevention,” she said.

The board also agreed that staff, students, parents, and the community should consider the results of the survey.

“We don’t want to scare you to death or be negative, but on the other side, here are the facts,” said Fox.

Bill Esterbrook, assistant superintendent, said the Health and Wellness committee needs to be expanded to include increased community conversation.

“We need to get to a point in the community where we can discuss tricky things,” he said. “Because this behavior can be devastating.”

Superintendent Mark DeVoti said he felt encouraged by the willingness and enthusiasm to discuss the issues revealed by the survey.

“I’m glad we don’t have our heads buried in the sand,” he said.

In other school board news:

• In his superintendent’s report, DeVoti announced that the Pirate Achievement Center is “Ninety-nine point nine” percent completed, and will be ready for the new school year.

• The board adopted the Regional Parks, Recreation, Open Space and Trails Master Plan for Archuleta County and Pagosa Springs.

• The board approved the elimination of bus route 5 during the winter months. Dolly Martin, transportation director, said alternative pick up routes will be created. Parents will be notified when the route will stop running, and when it will continue in the spring.

High school bell schedule to change this year

School starts Sept. 2, and the bell schedule for students at Pagosa Springs High School has changed, with school now beginning at 7:45 a.m. instead of 8:20 a.m. The last bell will still ring at 3:20 p.m., but the Pirate Achievement Hour, during which students are encouraged to seek extra help from teachers or use as a study period, will move to 2:40 p.m. Students not participating in the Pirate Achievement Hour will end school at 2:40 p.m.

In addition, only freshmen will attend school on Sept. 2. Sophomores, juniors and seniors will begin the school year Sept. 3. The first day will be set aside for freshman orientation. Freshmen will be assigned lockers and class schedules, meet their teachers, participate in team building exercises, and learn more about the clubs and organizations at the high school. According to David Hamilton, high school principal, freshmen will complete an online assessment to discover areas of strength, and help determine a plan for courses and elections for their high school career.

This will also help determine post-secondary options available for each student, said Hamilton.

“When freshmen come into school, they don’t know what they’re doing,” said Hamilton. “We want to take away some of the trees so they can see ahead of them.”

Students and parents can visit www.mypagosaschools.com for grades, attendance reports, athletic schedules, links for post-secondary information, and counseling and career information.


Intermediate school to host back-to-school luau

Aloha!

Pagosa Springs Intermediate School faculty and staff would like to welcome all fifth- and sixth-grade students and their families to a back-to-school luau on Thursday, Aug. 28, from 5 to 6:30 p.m.

Dust off that grass skirt and unpack your muumuu to come meet your teachers, tour the school, hang out with old friends and meet new friends.

All family members of Pagosa Springs Intermediate School students are welcome to attend. Hawaiian attire is encouraged but not required.

We hope to see you for an excellent time — Hawaiian style.


Back to School Immunization Clinic Monday, August 18

San Juan Basin Health in Pagosa Springs is holding its Back to School Immunization Clinic Monday, Aug. 18.

Call 264-2409, Ext. 33, for an appointment. Colorado requires school vaccinations be obtained before the first day of school.

Bring your proof of insurance, such as Medicaid or CHP+ card.

San Juan Basin Health is located at 502 S. 8th St.


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The first reading of Ordinance No. 04 was completed at the Regular Pagosa Springs Sanitation General Improvement District Meeting held on August 5, 2008 at 5:00 p.m. in the Council Chambers at the Town Hall. ORDINANCE NO. 04, AN ORDINANCE OF THE TOWN OF PAGOSA SPRINGS SANITATION GENERAL IMPROVEMENT DISTRICT GRANTING PETITION FOR INCLUSION OF ADDITIONAL REAL PROPERTY INTO THE BOUNDARIES OF THE DISTRICT.

The Ordinance can be read in its entirety in the office of the Town Clerk at Town Hall.

Published August 14, 2008 in The Pagosa Springs SUN.

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The first reading of Ordinance No. 05 was completed at the Regular Pagosa Springs Sanitation General Improvement District Meeting held on August 5, 2008 at 5:00 p.m. in the Council Chambers at the Town Hall. ORDINANCE NO. 05, AN ORDINANCE OF THE TOWN OF PAGOSA SPRINGS SANITATION GENERAL IMPROVEMENT DISTRICT WASTEWATER ACTIVITY ENTERPRISE APPROVING A LOAN BETWEEN THE COLORADO WATER RESOURCES AND POWER DEVELOPMENT AUTHORITY AND THE DISTRICT, ACTING BY AND THROUGH THE WASTEWATER ACTIVITY ENTERPRISE, FOR THE PURPOSE OF FINANCING A PORTION OF THE COST OF CONSTRUCTING A NEW WATER TREATMENT PLANT; AUTHORIZING THE FORM AND EXECUTION OF A LOAN AGREEMENT AND A GOVERNMENTAL AGENCY BOND EVIDENCING THE LOAN; PROVIDING FOR PAYMENT OF THE GOVERNMENTAL AGENCY BOND FROM REVENUES OF THE WASTEWATER ACTIVITY ENTERPRISE; AUTHORIZING THE EARLY PAYMENT OF THE DISTRICT’S 2002 LOAN FROM THE COLORADO WATER RESOURCES AND POWER DEVELOPMENT AUTHORITY; AND PRESCRIBING OTHER DETAILS IN CONNECTION THEREWITH.

The Ordinance can be read in its entirety in the office of the Town Clerk at Town Hall.

Published August 14, 2008 in The Pagosa Springs SUN.

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The first reading of Ordinance No. 717 was completed at the Regular Pagosa Springs Town Council Meeting held on August 5, 2008 at 5:00 p.m. in the Council Chambers at the Town Hall. ORDINANCE NO. 717, AN ORDINANCE OF THE TOWN OF PAGOSA SPRINGS ADDING ARTICLE 4, CHAPTER 2, CODE OF ETHICS, TO THE PAGOSA SPRINGS MUNICIPAL CODE.

The Ordinance can be read in its entirety in the office of the Town Clerk at Town Hall.

Published August 14, 2008 in The Pagosa Springs SUN.

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The first reading of Ordinance No. 718 was completed at the Regular Pagosa Springs Town Council Meeting held on August 5, 2008 at 5:00 p.m. in the Council Chambers at the Town Hall. ORDINANCE NO. 718, AN ORDINANCE OF THE TOWN OF PAGOSA SPRINGS AMENDING SECTION 12.10.4 OF THE TOWN OF PAGOSA SPRINGS MUNICIPAL CODE, REGARDING LOITERING.

The Ordinance can be read in its entirety in the office of the Town Clerk at Town Hall.

Published August 14, 2008 in The Pagosa Springs SUN.

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The first reading of Ordinance No. 719 was completed at the Regular Pagosa Springs Town Council Meeting held on August 5, 2008 at 5:00 p.m. in the Council Chambers at the Town Hall. ORDINANCE NO. 719, AN ORDINANCE OF THE TOWN OF PAGOSA SPRINGS ADOPTING SECTION 14.2.5 OF THE TOWN OF PAGOSA SPRINGS MUNICIPAL CODE, REGARDING PROHIBITED ACTS IN TOWN PARKS, PLAYGROUNDS, AND RECREATIONAL FACILITIES.

The Ordinance can be read in its entirety in the office of the Town Clerk at Town Hall.

Published August 14, 2008 in The Pagosa Springs SUN.

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The Archuleta County Housing Authority hereby gives notice of a Public Hearing to receive and consider public comment on the proposed Annual PHA Plan for fiscal year 2009. The Hearing is scheduled to begin at 12:00 pm on Friday, September 26, 2008 at Housing Solutions for the Southwest, 295 Girard St., Durango, CO 81303. The PHA Plans with attachments and supporting documents for fiscal year 2009 and the 5-year plan for fiscal years 2005-2009 will be available for public inspection beginning August 6, 2008 at Housing Solutions for the Southwest, 295 Girard St., Durango, CO from 9:00 am to 4:00 pm, Monday through Thursday, 9:00 am to 12:00 pm on Fridays.

Published August 14, 2008 in The Pagosa Springs SUN.

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The second reading of Ordinance No. 712 was completed at the Regular Town Council Meeting held on August 5, 2008 at 5:00 p.m. in the Council Chambers at the Town Hall. AN ORDINANCE OF THE TOWN OF PAGOSA SPRINGS AMENDING ARTICLE 15, CHAPTER 21 OF THE PAGOSA SPRINGS MUNICIPAL CODE TO ADOPT BY REFERENCE THE INTERNATIONAL BUILDING CODE, 2006 EDITION, INCLUDING APPENDIx Chapter j; INTERNATIONAL ENERGY CONSERVATION CODE, 2006 EDITION; INTERNATIONAL RESIDENTIAL CODE, 2006 EDITION INCLUDING APPENDIces CHAPTERs E and m; INTERNATIONAL FIRE CODE, 2006 EDITION, INCLUDING APPENDIces CHAPTERs A, B, and C; INTERNATIONAL MECHANICAL CODE, 2006 EDITION; and INTERNATIONAL FUEL GAS CODE, 2006 EDITION, AND REPEALING ARTICLE 17, CHAPTER 21 OF THE PAGOSA SPRINGS MUNICIPAL CODE AND REPEALING THE PRIOR ADOPTION OF APPENDIX CHAPTER D TO THE INTERNATIONAL FIRE CODE, 2006 EDITION. The Ordinance went into effect on August 5, 2008.

Published August 14, 2008 in The Pagosa Springs SUN.

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The second reading of Ordinance No. 716 was completed at the Regular Town Council Meeting held on August 5, 2008 at 5:00 p.m. in the Council Chambers at the Town Hall. ORDINANCE 716, AN ORDINANCE OF THE TOWN OF PAGOSA SPRINGS REVISING SIGN CODE PROVISION OF THE PAGOSA SPRINGS MUNICIPAL CODE. The Ordinance went into effect on August 5, 2008.

Published August 14, 2008 in The Pagosa Springs SUN.

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The second reading of Ordinance No. 2008-03 was completed at the Regular Pagosa Springs Sanitation General Improvement District Meeting held on August 5, 2008 at 5:00 p.m. in the Council Chambers at the Town Hall. ORDINANCE 2008-03, AN ORDINANCE OF THE TOWN OF PAGOSA SPRINGS SANITATION GENERAL IMPROVEMENT DISTRICT GRANTING THE LAVERTY PETITION FOR INCLUSION OF REAL PROPERTY INTO THE BOUNDARIES OF THE DISTRICT AND AMENDING PORTIONS OF ORDINANCE NO.04, SERIES 2007 AND ORDINANCE NO. 02, SERIES 2008. The Ordinance went into effect on August 5, 2008.

Published August 14, 2008 in The Pagosa Springs SUN.

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The Pagosa Springs Town Council will be having a public hearing on Ordinance No. 717. ORDINANCE NO. 717, AN ORDINANCE OF THE TOWN OF PAGOSA SPRINGS ADDING ARTICLE 4, CHAPTER 2, CODE OF ETHICS, TO THE PAGOSA SPRINGS MUNICIPAL CODE. The public hearing will be held on Tuesday September 2, 2008 at 5:00 p.m. in the Town Hall Council Chambers. All people wishing to comment should be present at that meeting or have written comments in the office of the Town Clerk no later than 12:00 p.m. on August 29, 2008.

Published August 14, 2008 in The Pagosa Springs SUN.

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The Pagosa Springs Town Council will be having a public hearing on Ordinance No. 718. ORDINANCE NO. 718, AN ORDINANCE OF THE TOWN OF PAGOSA SPRINGS AMENDING SECTION 12.10.4 OF THE TOWN OF PAGOSA SPRINGS MUNICIPAL CODE, REGARDING LOITERING. The public hearing will be held on Tuesday September 2, 2008 at 5:00 p.m. in the Town Hall Council Chambers. All people wishing to comment should be present at that meeting or have written comments in the office of the Town Clerk no later than 12:00 p.m. on August 29, 2008.

Published August 14, 2008 in The Pagosa Springs SUN.

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The Pagosa Springs Town Council will be having a public hearing on Ordinance No. 719. ORDINANCE NO. 719, AN ORDINANCE OF THE TOWN OF PAGOSA SPRINGS ADOPTING SECTION 14.2.5 OF THE TOWN OF PAGOSA SPRINGS MUNICIPAL CODE, REGARDING PROHIBITED ACTS IN TOWN PARKS, PLAYGROUNDS, AND RECREATIONAL FACILITIES. The public hearing will be held on Tuesday September 2, 2008 at 5:00 p.m. in the Town Hall Council Chambers. All people wishing to comment should be present at that meeting or have written comments in the office of the Town Clerk no later than 12:00 p.m. on August 29, 2008.

Published August 14, 2008 in The Pagosa Springs SUN.

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NOTICE OF FINAL SETTLEMENT

PROJECT # MTCE R500-096

SUB ACCOUNT # 16655

In accordance with the notice provisions contained in 38-26-107 C.R.S. 1973 as amended, the DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION, STATE OF COLORADO has established SEPTEMBER 1, 2008 as the date of final settlement date with HIGH MARK TRAFFIC SERVICES, INC., for Project MTCE R500-096, FY06 REGION WIDE EPOXY STRIPING. County locations included: MONTEZUMA, LA PLATA, ARCHULETA, DOLORES, SAN MIGUEL, MONTROSE, OURAY, SAN JUAN, RIO GRANDE, COSTILLA, CHAFFEE, FREMONT, MINERAL AND SAGUACHE. Work consisted of: Epoxy pavement marking for striping longitudinal yellow and white lines covered approximately 800 miles. Striping covered all of Region 5 on US 160, US 285, US 491, US 50, US 24 and US 550 and mountainous sections of other selected State Highways. Mobile traffic control to support the pavement striping operation.

Claims containing a verified statement of the amounts due and unpaid must be in the form of a written affidavit and must be received by the CONTROLLER, Department of Transportation at 4201 E. Arkansas Avenue, Denver, Colorado, 80222, on or before 5:00 p.m. of the final settlement date above.

Pamela Hutton, P.E., Chief Engineer, Department of Transportation

Published August 14 and 21, 2008 in The Pagosa Springs SUN.

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Storage Sale

Due to default in rent the following items will be sold pursuant to state law set forth in C.R.S. 38-21.5-101. A 1967 Ford F100 2WD pickup, and a Ford F-6 flatbed truck (possibly a 1948 model). This property belongs to Jeff Salazar, PO Box 195, Silverton, Co.,81433. This sale will take place on August 23, 2008, at 10:00 AM. at Lakeview Storage, 400 CR 982, Arboles, Co.,81121

Published August 14 and 21, 2008 in The Pagosa Springs SUN.

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The Pagosa Springs Sanitation General Improvement District will be having a public hearing on Ordinance No. 2008-04. ORDINANCE NO. 2008-04, AN ORDINANCE OF THE TOWN OF PAGOSA SPRINGS SANITATION GENERAL IMPROVEMENT DISTRICT GRANTING PETITION FOR INCLUSION OF ADDITIONAL REAL PROPERTY INTO THE BOUNDARIES OF THE DISTRICT. The public hearing will be held on Tuesday September 2, 2008 at 5:00 p.m. in the Town Hall Council Chambers. All people wishing to comment should be present at that meeting or have written comments in the office of the Town Clerk no later than 12:00 p.m. on August 29, 2008.

Published August 14, 2008 in The Pagosa Springs SUN.

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PUBLIC HEARING

The Pagosa Springs Sanitation General Improvement District will be having a public hearing on Ordinance No. 2008-05. ORDINANCE NO. 2008-05, AN ORDINANCE OF THE TOWN OF PAGOSA SPRINGS SANITATION GENERAL IMPROVEMENT DISTRICT WASTEWATER ACTIVITY ENTERPRISE APPROVING A LOAN BETWEEN THE COLORADO WATER RESOURCES AND POWER DEVELOPMENT AUTHORITY AND THE DISTRICT, ACTING BY AND THROUGH THE WASTEWATER ACTIVITY ENTERPRISE, FOR THE PURPOSE OF FINANCING A PORTION OF THE COST OF CONSTRUCTING A NEW WATER TREATMENT PLANT; AUTHORIZING THE FORM AND EXECUTION OF A LOAN AGREEMENT AND A GOVERNMENTAL AGENCY BOND EVIDENCING THE LOAN; PROVIDING FOR PAYMENT OF THE GOVERNMENTAL AGENCY BOND FROM REVENUES OF THE WASTEWATER ACTIVITY ENTERPRISE; AUTHORIZING THE EARLY PAYMENT OF THE DISTRICT’S 2002 LOAN FROM THE COLORADO WATER RESOURCES AND POWER DEVELOPMENT AUTHORITY; AND PRESCRIBING OTHER DETAILS IN CONNECTION THEREWITH. The public hearing will be held on Thursday August 28, 2008 at 12:30 p.m. in the Town Hall Council Chambers. All people wishing to comment should be present at that meeting or have written comments in the office of the Town Clerk no later than 12:00 p.m. on August 27, 2008.

Published August 14, 2008 in The Pagosa Springs SUN.

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COMBINED NOTICE ARCHULETA COUNTY

PUBLIC TRUSTEE

SALE NO. 65-2008

This Notice concerns the Deed of Trust (“Trust Deed”) described as follows:

Grantor: Cindi E Van Andel

Original Beneficiary: Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., acting solely as nominee for The Mortgage Company

Current Owner of the Evidence of Debt: Thornburg Mortgage Home Loans Inc

Date of Deed of Trust: May 04, 2006

Recording Date of Deed of Trust: May 10, 2006

Original Principal Amount of Evidence of Debt: $264,000.00

Outstanding Principal Amount of Evidence of Debt as of the date hereof: $264,000.00

County of Recording: Archuleta

Book and Page No. or Reception No. of Recorded Deed of Trust: as Reception No. 20604214

Legal Description of Real Property: LOT 569, TWINCREEK VILLAGE, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED NOVEMBER 5, 1973 AS RECEPTION NO. 78739, IN THE OFFICE OF THE CLERK AND RECORDER, ARCHULETA COUNTY, COLORADO. Also known as: 276 Captain Circle, Pagosa Springs, CO 81147

THE PROPERTY DESCRIBED HEREIN IS ALL OF THE PROPERTY CURRENTLY ENCUMBERED BY THE LIEN OF THE DEED OF TRUST.

THE LIEN OF THE DEED OF TRUST TO BE FORECLOSED MAY NOT BE A FIRST LIEN.

YOU ARE NOTIFIED AS FOLLOWS:

The Holder of the debt secured by the Deed of Trust declares a violation of the covenants of said Deed of Trust for reasons including, but not limited to, the failure to make payments as provided for in the Deed of Trust and Negotiable Instrument.

The Holder of the Debt secured by the Deed of Trust has filed a written Notice of Election and Demand for sale with the undersigned Public Trustee under the terms of the Deed of Trust.

A notice of Intent to Cure filed pursuant to Colorado Revised Statutes 38-38-104 shall be filed with the undersigned at least 15 calendar days prior to the first schedule sale date or any date to which the sale is continued.

A notice of Intent to Redeem pursuant to Colorado Revised Statutes 38-38-302 shall be filed with the undersigned no later than 8 business days after the sale.

The name, address and telephone number of each attorney (if any) representing the Holder of the Debt is as follows:

Robert J. Aronowitz, Esq.Reg. No. 5673

Joel T. Mecklenburg, Esq. Reg. No. 36291

Stacey L. Aronowitz, Esq. Reg. No. 36290

Joan Olson, Esq. Reg. No. 28078

Marcy L. McDermott, Esq. Reg. o 38030

Aronowitz & Ford, LLP

1199 Bannock Street

Denver, Colorado 80204

(303) 813-1177

NOTICE OF SALE

The undersigned will on October 9, 2008, at 10:00 a.m., at 449 San Juan St., Archuleta County Courthouse, Pagosa Springs, CO 81147, sell the Property at public auction to the highest bidder who has submitted bid funds to the undersigned as specified by C.R.S. 38-38-1-6(7) to pay the Debt and certain other sums, all as provided by applicable law and the Deed of Trust.

THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED MAY BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE.

DATED: June 16, 2008

/s/ Kelly Evans

Public Trustee of Archuleta County, Colorado

Kelly Evans

Public Trustee of Archuleta County

By: /s/ Vicky Rudock

Deputy Public Trustee

Published August 14, 21, 28, September 4 and 11, 2008 in The Pagosa Springs SUN.

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NOTICE OF HEARING ON PETITION

FOR INCLUSION OF ADDITIONAL REAL PROPERTY

WITHIN THE TOWN OF PAGOSA SPRINGS SANITATION

GENERAL IMPROVEMENT DISTRICT

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN to all interested persons that a Petition for Inclusion of additional real property into the boundaries of the Town of Pagosa Springs Sanitation General Improvement District (“District”) has been filed with the Board of Directors of the District. A public hearing on the Petition shall be held in the Town Hall Council Chambers, the 2nd day of September, 2008, at the hour of 5:00 p.m., at 551 Hot Springs Boulevard, Pagosa Springs, Colorado.

(1) The name(s) of the Petitioner(s) is/are:

Nyman Limited Partnership

1728 South East 40th

Terrace Cape Coral, FL 33904

The property requested to be included into the District is described as follows:

Lot D-8, Harman Park Subdivision Final Plat, recorded December 21, 2004 as Reception No. 20412244.

(2) The name(s) of the Petitioner(s) is/are:

R. Hollis Klett

5880 Quay Road AY

Tucumcari, NM 88401

The property requested to be included into the District is described as follows:

Lot H-3, Harman Park Subdivision Final Plat, recorded December 21, 2004 as Reception No. 20412244.

(3) The name(s) of the Petitioner(s) is/are:

Mark N. Vinzant Revocable Trust

1213 Brook Forest Court

Derby, KS 67037

The property requested to be included into the District is described as follows:

Pagosa Alpha, PA 15-6 #20111038

(4) The name(s) of the Petitioner(s) is/are:

Harman Artist, LLC

85 Harman Park Drive

Pagosa Springs, CO 81147

The property requested to be included into the District is described as follows:

Lots E, F, D-2, D-3, D-4, D-5, D-6 and D-7, Harman Park Subdivision Final Plat, recorded December 21, 2004 as Reception No. 20412244.

(5) The name(s) of the Petitioner(s) is/are:

Fred C. Harman III

P.O. Box 192

Pagosa Springs, CO 81147

The property requested to be included into the District is described as follows:

Lots A-1, B and C Harman Park Subdivision Final Plat, recorded December 21, 2004 as Reception No. 20412244.

(6) The name(s) of the Petitioner(s) is/are:

Wells Fargo Bank West N.A.

MAC C7300-120

1740 Broadway

Denver, Colorado 80274

The property requested to be included into the District is described as follows:

Lot 1, Harman Park Minor Impact Subdivision, Plat No. 646-646A recorded September 18, 2002 as Reception No. 20208444.

(7) The name(s) of the Petitioner(s) is/are:

Wells Fargo Bank West N.A.

MAC C7300-120

1740 Broadway

Denver, Colorado 80274

The property requested to be included into the District is described as follows:

Lot H-2, Harman Park Subdivision Final Plat, recorded December 21, 2004 as Reception No. 20412244.

(8) The name(s) of the Petitioner(s) is/are:

OGI Inc./Jack Searle

841 Hersch Avenue

Pagosa Springs, CO 81147

The property requested to be included into the District is described as follows:

Lot 2, Harman Park Minor Impact Subdivision Correction as set forth in Plat recorded June 1, 2004 as Reception No. 20404821.

(9) The name(s) of the Petitioner(s) is/are:

Pagosa Bible Church

40 County Road 600, Suite E

Pagosa Springs, CO 81147

The property requested to be included into the District is described as follows:

Lot D-1, Harman Park Subdivision Final Plat, recorded December 21, 2004 as Reception No. 20412244.

(10) The name(s) of the Petitioner(s) is/are:

William S Jones & Linda S. Jones

7346 Osborne Meadows Drive

Arlington, TN 38112

The property requested to be included into the District is described as follows:

Pagosa Alpha, PA 15-5 #20504181

(11) The name(s) of the Petitioner(s) is/are:

Christopher J. Levonius & Caroline D. Levonius

1284 Wheeler Place

Pagosa Springs, CO 81147

The property requested to be included into the District is described as follows:

Pagosa Alpha, PA 15-12X (Lots 12 & 13) #20507899

(12) The name(s) of the Petitioner(s) is/are:

Harman Park Village Phase 1A, LLC

191 Talisman Drive, Suite 105

Pagosa Springs, CO 81147

The property requested to be included into the District is described as follows:

Lot H-6X Harman Park Subdivision Amended Plat 2007, recorded October 24, 2007 as Reception No. 20709964.

(13) The name(s) of the Petitioner(s) is/are:

Aspen View Properties, LLC

191 Talisman Drive, Suite 105

Pagosa Springs, CO 81147

The property requested to be included into the District is described as follows:

Lots G and H-4X, Harman Park Subdivision Amended Plat 2007, recorded October 24, 2007 as Reception No. 20709964.

(14) The name(s) of the Petitioner(s) is/are:

Giancaspro Trust (dated July 13, 2004)

P.O. Box 2465

Pagosa Springs, CO 81147

The property requested to be included into the District is described as follows:

Lot H-1, Harman Park Subdivision Final Plat, recorded December 21, 2004 as Reception No. 20412244.

(15) The name(s) of the Petitioner(s) is/are:

Trinity Anglican Church

P.O. Box 192

Pagosa Springs, CO 81147

The property requested to be included into the District is described as follows:

Lot H-8, Harman Park Subdivision Final Plat, recorded December 21, 2004 as Reception No. 20412244.

All interested parties may appear at such hearing to show cause why such Petition should not be granted.

BY ORDER OF THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS OF THE TOWN OF PAGOSA SPRINGS SANITATION GENERAL IMPROVEMENT DISTRICT.

TOWN OF PAGOSA SPRINGS SANITATION

GENERAL IMPROVEMENT DISTRICT

By: /s/ Deanna Jaramillo, Secretary

Published August 14, 21 and 28, 2008 in The Pagosa Springs SUN.

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A variance from section 3.1.4 of the Archuleta County Land Use Regulations regarding the side and rear setback for one lot located on approximately one-third acre is proposed on a portion of Lot 627, Twincreek Village. The property is located at 90 Fisher Court, Pagosa Springs, CO; approximately .25 mile from the intersection of Antelope and North Pagosa.

Comments regarding this proposal may be submitted to the Archuleta County Planning Department, P.O. Box 1507, Pagosa Springs, CO 81147-1507, telephone: (970) 731-3877 prior to the public hearing by the Board of County Commissioners on September 2, 2008, at 1:30 p.m. in the County Courthouse. If you prefer, you may attend the public hearing and be heard.

Published August 14 and 21, 2008 in The Pagosa Springs SUN.

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NOTICE OF PUBLIC COMMENT PERIOD AND HEARING

The Pagosa Area Water and Sanitation District is seeking comments on its draft Water Conservation Plan. The Plan is an update to the District’s current Water Conservation and Drought Management Plan.

The Plan may be viewed at:

PAWSD Administrative Offices

100 Lyn Ave.

Pagosa Lakes POA Administrative Offices

230 Port Ave.

Archuleta County Administrative Offices

449 San Juan St.

Town of Pagosa Springs Town Hall

551 Hot Springs Blvd.

Sisson Library

811 San Juan St.

The Plan may also be downloaded from the District’s web site, www.pawsd.org

Comments will be accepted until October 7th, 2008. Comments may be submitted by email, mail, phone, fax or by visiting the PAWSD offices at 100 Lyn Avenue, P.O. Drawer 4610, Pagosa Springs, CO 81157, (970) 731-2691, (970) 731-2693 [Fax], or info@pawsd.org.

The PAWSD Board of Directors will hold a Public Hearing at 6:30 pm October 14, 2008 located at PAWSD Administrative Offices. Public comment will also be heard at the October 14th Public Hearing.

Published August 7 and 14, 2008 in The Pagosa Springs SUN.

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INVITATION FOR BIDS

Notice is hereby given that Archuleta County, Colorado, hereinafter referred to as the “County” will receive sealed Bids for the replacement structure for Bridge No. AR551-SO1-C500A on County Road 551, located approximately 23 miles south of Pagosa Springs, over the San Juan River. The work consists of removal of the existing 122’-0” steel stringer bridge; the construction of a new 150’-0” single span prestressed concrete (BT 72) girder replacement structure with concrete abutments and wingwalls, steel piling, structure excavation and backfill; embankment material; approach roadway; aggregate base course; guardrail, riprap; topsoil; seeding and mulching; and other miscellaneous work.

Only bidders pre-qualified in accordance with the Rules for Pre-qualification, Debarment, Bidding and Work on Colorado Department of Highways’ Road, Highways, and Bridge Public Projects, 2 CCR 601-10 will be allowed to bid on the project. The “DBE” goal for this project has been established as follows: 12%.

A non-mandatory pre-bid conference will be held at the Archuleta County Public Works Building, located at 1122 Highway 84, Pagosa Springs, Colorado at 10:30 am local time on August 11th, 2008. The conference attendee shall be an agent of the bidder, familiar and involved in the bidders work and the bidding process. The pre-bid conference will not include an organized site inspection of the proposed work. Failure to attend the non-mandatory pre-bid conference will not disqualify the bidder.

Bids will be received up to, but not later than 11:00am local time as determined by the County on August 21st, 2008 by Contracts and Procurement Officer, Archuleta County, Archuleta County Courthouse, located at 449 San Juan St., Pagosa Springs, Colorado 81147. Such bids will be publicly opened and read aloud at the above stated place and time.

The successful Bidder will be required to furnish, as part of the Contract Documents, CDOT Forms No.s 605, 606, 621, 714, 715, 718, an insurance certificate in the amount specified in the Contract Documents, a Performance Bond and Labor & Materials Payment Bond, each in an amount equal to 100% of the Contract price, including Force Account items, said bonds to be issued by a responsible corporate surety approved by Archuleta County and shall guarantee the faithful performance of the Contract and the terms and conditions therein contained and shall guarantee the prompt payment of all materials and labor and protect and save harmless Archuleta County and the Colorado Department of Transportation from claims and damages of any kind caused by the operations of the Contractor.

The County reserves the right in awarding the contract for replacement work to consider the qualifications and responsibility of bidders as well as amounts of bids. The County intends to award the contract to the bidder that best serves its interest. The County further reserves the right to accept or reject any or all bids, to waive any irregularities or informalities, or to re-advertise for bids if it is determined in the sole determination of the County, to be necessary or desirable.

Copies of the Contract Documents may be obtained on or after July 30th, 2008 from SEH Inc., Colorado Center Tower One, Suite 6000, 2000 South Colorado Blvd., Denver, Colorado 80222-7900. Plans are available upon payment of $50.00, non-refundable for each set.

Federal Aid Project No. BRO C480-002

Subcontract No. 15390

Bridge Replacement AR551-S01-C500A

County Road 551

Published August 7 and 14, 2008 in The Pagosa Springs SUN.

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NOTICE OF ANNUAL MEETING

The annual meeting and election of directors for Western Heritage Event Center (formerly Pagosa Springs Enterprises, Inc.), organizer and sponsor of the annual Red Ryder Roundup Rodeo, will be held at 6:30 p.m. August 21, 2008.

At the meeting in the Archuleta County Fair building, four directors will be elected to a three-year term each.

Only registered members of record as of June 22, 2007 will be entitled to vote. Proxy votes must be in writing designating the person who is to cast the vote (who must be a registered member of the corporation), and have signature of member and date. Proxies must be presented at the beginning of the annual meeting at registration. The maximum number of proxies any individual can represent is five (5).

Current board members are Jim Bramwell, president; Mike Ray, vice president; Lisa Scott, treasurer; Penne DeClark, secretary; Chuck Betts, Wes Lewis, J.R. Ford, Tim McRee, and Alvin Schaaf, all directors.

Published August 7, 14 and 21, 2007 in The Pagosa Springs SUN.

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NOTICE TO CREDITORS

Estate of Leatha W. Tucker, a.k.a. Letha Tucker, Deceased

Case No. 08PR30

All persons having claims against the above-named estate are required to present them to the personal representative or to the District Court of Archuleta County, Colorado on or before December 7, 2008, or the claims may be forever barred.

William Ray Schnoover

P.O. Box 774

Pagosa Springs, CO 81147

970-264-4501

Published August 7, 14 and 21, 2008 in The Pagosa Springs SUN.

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COMBINED NOTICE OF SALE AND RIGHT TO CURE OR REDEEM

To Whom it may concern: This Notice is given with regard to the following described Deed of Trust:

Public Trustee’s Foreclosure Sale No. 62-2008 was commenced on 6-10-08 in the office of the undersigned Public Trustee relating to the Deed of Trust described below:

Tim Farmer and Sheila Farmer Original Grantor(s)

Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as nominee for Guaranteed Rate, Inc. Original Beneficiary

The Bank of New York as Trustee for the Certificateholders CWABS, Inc. Asset-Backed Certificates, Series 2006-23 Current Holder of Evidence of Debt

September 15, 2006 Date of Deed of Trust

Archuleta County of Recording

September 15, 2006 Recording Date of Deed of Trust:

At Reception No. 20608934 Recording Information Receipt No. and/or Book No. and Page No.

$203,900.00 Original Principal Balance

$202,066.78 Outstanding Principal Balance

Pursuant to C.R.S. § 38-38-101(4)(i), you are hereby notified that the covenants of the Deed of Trust have been violated as follows: Failure to pay principal and interest when due together with all other payments provided for in the Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust and other violations thereof.

THE LIEN FORECLOSED MAY NOT BE A FIRST LIEN.

THE PROPERTY DESCRIBED HEREIN IS ALL OF THE PROPERTY CURRENTLY ENCUMBERED BY THE LIEN OF THE DEED OF TRUST.

LOT 555, PAGOSA HIGHLANDS ESTATES, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF FILED FEBRUARY 7, 1972 AS RECEPTION NO. 75409, IN THE OFFICE OF THE CLERK AND RECORDER, ARCHULETA COUNTY, COLORADO.

WHICH HAS THE ADDRESS OF 40 Saturn Drive Pagosa Springs, CO 81147

NOTICE OF SALE

The current Holder of the Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust described herein, has filed written election and demand for sale as provided by law and in said Deed of Trust.

THEREFORE, Notice Is Herby Given that I will at public auction at 10:00 a.m. on October 2, 2008, at at the front door of the Archuleta County Public Trustee’s Office, 449 San Juan Street, Pagosa Springs, Colorado, sell to the highest and best bidder for cash, the said real property and all interest of the said Grantor(s), Grantor(s)’ heirs and assigns therein, for the purpose of paying the indebtedness provided in said Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust, plus attorney’s fees, the expenses of sale, and other items allowed by law, and will deliver to the purchaser a Certificate of Purchase, all as provided by law.

NOTICE OF RIGHTS

YOU MAY HAVE AN INTEREST IN THE REAL PROPERTY BEING FORECLOSED, OR HAVE CERTAIN RIGHTS OR SUFFER CERTAIN LIABILITIES PURSUANT TO COLORADO STATUTES AS A RESULT OF SAID FORECLOSURE. YOU MAY HAVE THE RIGHT TO REDEEM SAID REAL PROPERTY OR YOU MAY HAVE THE RIGHT TO CURE A DEFAULT UNDER THE DEED OF TRUST BEING FORECLOSED. A COPY OF SAID STATUTES, AS SUCH STATUTES ARE PRESENTLY CONSTITUTED, WHICH MAY AFFECT YOUR RIGHTS, IS ATTACHED TO THIS NOTICE. HOWEVER, YOUR RIGHTS MAY BE DETERMINED BY PREVIOUS STATUTES.

A NOTICE OF INTENT TO CURE FILED PURSUANT TO C.R.S. 38-38-104 SHALL BE FILED WITH THE PUBLIC TRUSTEE AT LEAST FIFTEEN (15) CALENDAR DAYS PRIOR TO THE FIRST SCHEDULED SALE DATE OR ANY DATE TO WHICH THE SALE IS CONTINUED.

A NOTICE OF INTENT TO REDEEM FILED PURSUANT TO C.R.S. 38-38-302 SHALL BE FILED WITH THE PUBLIC TRUSTEE NO LATER THAN EIGHT (8) BUSINESS DAYS AFTER THE SALE.

DATE: 6-10-08

Public Trustee of Archuleta County, State of Colorado

/s/ Kelly Evans by Vicky Rudock, Deputy

By: Kelly Evans, Public Trustee

The name, address and telephone number of the attorneys representing the legal holder of the indebtedness is:

Caren Jacobs Castle #11790

Deanne R. Stodden #33214

Elizabeth S. Marcus #16092

Barbara A. Bader #10394

Jennifer C. Rogers #34682

Britney Beall-Eder #34935

P.C. Wolf #34797

Katharine E. Fisher #39230

Lauren R. Smith #39316

Jeremy D. Peck #36588

Castle Meinhold & Stawiarski, LLC, 999 18th Street, Suite 2201, Denver, CO 80202, (303) 865-1400

THE ATTORNEY ABOVE IS ACTING AS A DEBT COLLECTOR AND IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION PROVIDED MAY BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE.

Published August 7, 14, 21, 28 and September 4, 2008 in The Pagosa Springs SUN.

_______________________

COMBINED NOTICE OF SALE AND RIGHT TO CURE OR REDEEM

To Whom it may concern: This Notice is given with regard to the following described Deed of Trust:

Public Trustee’s Foreclosure Sale No. 63-2008 was commenced on 6-10-08 in the office of the undersigned Public Trustee relating to the Deed of Trust described below:

Charles L Lewis Original Grantor(s)

Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. Original Beneficiary

HSBC Bank USA, National Association, as Trustee for WFMBS 2007-14 Current Holder of Evidence of Debt

June 6, 2007 Date of Deed of Trust

Archuleta County of Recording

June 11, 2007 Recording Date of Deed of Trust:

At Reception No. 20705074 Recording Information Receipt No. and/or Book No. and Page No.

$819,000.00 Original Principal Balance

$814,387.81 Outstanding Principal Balance

Pursuant to C.R.S. § 38-38-101(4)(i), you are hereby notified that the covenants of the Deed of Trust have been violated as follows: Failure to pay principal and interest when due together with all other payments provided for in the Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust and other violations thereof.

THE LIEN FORECLOSED MAY NOT BE A FIRST LIEN.

THE PROPERTY DESCRIBED HEREIN IS ALL OF THE PROPERTY CURRENTLY ENCUMBERED BY THE LIEN OF THE DEED OF TRUST.

PARCEL 2, AMENDED MAP OF MILL CREEK MEADOWS RANCH, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF FILED OCTOBER 15, 1996, AS RECEPTION NO. 1996007613 IN THE OFFICE OF THE CLERK AND RECORDER, ARCHULETA COUNTY, COLORADO.

WHICH HAS THE ADDRESS OF 1201 COUNTY ROAD 302 St Pagosa Springs, CO 81147

NOTICE OF SALE

The current Holder of the Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust described herein, has filed written election and demand for sale as provided by law and in said Deed of Trust.

THEREFORE, Notice Is Herby Given that I will at public auction at 10:00 a.m. on October 2, 2008, at at the front door of the Archuleta County Public Trustee’s Office, 449 San Juan Street, Pagosa Springs, Colorado, sell to the highest and best bidder for cash, the said real property and all interest of the said Grantor(s), Grantor(s)’ heirs and assigns therein, for the purpose of paying the indebtedness provided in said Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust, plus attorney’s fees, the expenses of sale, and other items allowed by law, and will deliver to the purchaser a Certificate of Purchase, all as provided by law.

NOTICE OF RIGHTS

YOU MAY HAVE AN INTEREST IN THE REAL PROPERTY BEING FORECLOSED, OR HAVE CERTAIN RIGHTS OR SUFFER CERTAIN LIABILITIES PURSUANT TO COLORADO STATUTES AS A RESULT OF SAID FORECLOSURE. YOU MAY HAVE THE RIGHT TO REDEEM SAID REAL PROPERTY OR YOU MAY HAVE THE RIGHT TO CURE A DEFAULT UNDER THE DEED OF TRUST BEING FORECLOSED. A COPY OF SAID STATUTES, AS SUCH STATUTES ARE PRESENTLY CONSTITUTED, WHICH MAY AFFECT YOUR RIGHTS, IS ATTACHED TO THIS NOTICE. HOWEVER, YOUR RIGHTS MAY BE DETERMINED BY PREVIOUS STATUTES.

A NOTICE OF INTENT TO CURE FILED PURSUANT TO C.R.S. 38-38-104 SHALL BE FILED WITH THE PUBLIC TRUSTEE AT LEAST FIFTEEN (15) CALENDAR DAYS PRIOR TO THE FIRST SCHEDULED SALE DATE OR ANY DATE TO WHICH THE SALE IS CONTINUED.

A NOTICE OF INTENT TO REDEEM FILED PURSUANT TO C.R.S. 38-38-302 SHALL BE FILED WITH THE PUBLIC TRUSTEE NO LATER THAN EIGHT (8) BUSINESS DAYS AFTER THE SALE.

DATE: 6-10-08

Public Trustee of Archuleta County, State of Colorado

/s/ Kelly Evans by Vicky Rudock, Deputy

By: Kelly Evans, Public Trustee

The name, address and telephone number of the attorneys representing the legal holder of the indebtedness is:

Caren Jacobs Castle #11790

Deanne R. Stodden #33214

Elizabeth S. Marcus #16092

Barbara A. Bader #10394

Jennifer C. Rogers #34682

Britney Beall-Eder #34935

P.C. Wolf #34797

Katharine E. Fisher #39230

Lauren R. Smith #39316

Jeremy D. Peck #36588

Castle Meinhold & Stawiarski, LLC, 999 18th Street, Suite 2201, Denver, CO 80202, (303) 865-1400

THE ATTORNEY ABOVE IS ACTING AS A DEBT COLLECTOR AND IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION PROVIDED MAY BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE.

Published August 7, 14, 21, 28 and September 4, 2008 in The Pagosa Springs SUN.

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COMBINED NOTICE OF SALE, RIGHT TO CURE AND RIGHT TO REDEEM

Sale No. 64-2008

This combined Notice concerns the Deed of Trust described as follows:

Original Grantor(s) Gary Liescheidt and Colleen Liescheidt

Original Beneficiary MERS as Nominee for Accredited Home Lenders, Inc.

Current Beneficiary The CIT Group/Consumer Finance, Inc.

Date of Deed of Trust May 25, 2006

Deed of Trust Recording Date May 31, 2006

County of Recording Archuleta

Recording Information Reception No. 20605197

Original Principal Balance $188,000.00

Outstanding Principal Balance $187,017.47

The real property being foreclosed is all of the property encumbered by said Deed of Trust, and is described as follows:

Lot 10, Block 6, Amended Aspen Springs Subdivision No. 1, According to the Plat thereof filed March 22, 1971, as Reception No. 74229, in the office of the Clerk and Recorder, Archuleta County, Colorado.

a/k/a 545 Oak Drive, Pagosa Springs, CO 81147

YOU ARE NOTIFIED AS FOLLOWS:

The Holder of the Debt secured by the Trust Deed has filed written election and demand for sale with the undersigned Public Trustee under the term of the Trust Deed.

A notice of intent to cure filed pursuant to Colorado Revised Statues § 38-38-104 shall be filed with the undersigned at least 15 calendar days prior to the first scheduled sale date or anydate to which the sale is continued.

A notice of intent to redeem filed pursuant to Colorado Revised Statutes § 38-38-302 shall be filed with the undersigned no later than 8 business days after the sale.

The undersigned will on October 2, 2008, at 10:00 a.m. at Archuleta County Courthouse, 449 San Juan St. sell the Property at public auction to the highest bidder who has submitted bid funds to the undersigned as specified by C.R.S. § 38-38-106(7) to pay the Debt and certain other sums, all as provided by applicable law and the Trust Deed.

THE LIEN OF THE DEED OF TRUST BEING FORECLOSED MAY NOT BE A FIRST LIEN.

DATED: JUNE 10, 2008

/s/ Kelly Evans

ARCHULETA COUNTY PUBLIC TRUSTEE

By: Vicky Rudock

(Deputy)

[Attach to mailed Notices copies of C.R.S. §§ 38-37-108, 38-38-103, 38-38-104, 38-38-301, 38-38-304, 38-38-305, and 38-38-306]

Attorney for owner of evidence of debt:

THE LAW FIRM OF JOHN A. LOBUS, P.C.

710 Kipling Street, Suite 402

Lakewood, Colorado 80215

(303) 232-5606

This is an attempt to collect a debt. Any information provided can be used for that purpose.

Published August 7, 14, 21, 28 and September 4, 2008 in The Pagosa Springs SUN.

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DISTRICT COURT, ARCHULETA COUNTY, COLORADO

Court Address: Combined Court

449 San Juan Street

P.O. Box 148

Pagosa Springs, CO 81147

Phone Number: (970) 264-2400

Plaintiff(s):

WYNDHAM VACATION RESORTS, INC., f/k/a FAIRFIELD RESORTS, INC., f/k/a FAIRFIELD COMMUNITIES, INC., A DELAWARE CORPORATION

v.

Defendant(s):

ROBERTO ALBERTORIO, RICKY BLANCHARD, LAURA BLANCHARD, STERLING D. DAVIDSON, KATHY A. DAVIDSON, DEAN P. DIETRICH, JESSICA DIETRICH, LEON G. GERBITZ, SANDRA GERBITZ, HAROLD W. FRYE, RUTH A. FRYE, LAURA T. GABALDON, KARL JON HABERMACHER, AND FAITH F. HABERMACHER

Submitting Attorney:

SHAND, NEWBOLD & CHAPMAN, P.C.

Keith Newbold

150 East 9th Street, Suite 400

P.O. Box 2790

Durango, CO 81302

Phone Number: (970) 247-3091

Fax Number: (970) 247-3100

E-Mail: knewbold@snc-law.com

Atty. Reg. No: 010629

Case Number: 2008-CV-153

SUMMONS BY PUBLICATION

THE PEOPLE OF THE STATE OF COLORADO TO THE ABOVE-NAMED DEFENDANTS:

You are hereby summoned and required to appear and defend against the claims of the Complaint filed with the Court in this action, by filing with the Clerk of this Court an answer or other response. You are required to file your answer or other response within 30 days after the service of this Summons upon you. Service of this Summons shall be complete on the day of the last publication. A copy of the Complaint may be obtained from the Clerk of the Court.

If you fail to file your answer or other response to the Complaint in writing within 30 days after the date of the last publication, judgment by default may be rendered against you by the Court for the relief demanded in the Complaint without further notice.

This is an action to quiet the title of the Plaintiff in and to the real property situate in Archuleta County, Colorado, more particularly described on Exhibit A, attached hereto and by this reference made a part hereof.

EXHIBIT “A”

Description of Real Property

A 105,000/17,743,000 undivided fee simple absolute interest in Units 7841-7842 in Building 21, as tenants in common with the other undivided interest owners of said building of PEREGRINE TOWNHOUSES PHASE V, as depicted on the Plat recorded at Reception Number 99006555, subject to Declaration of Protective Covenants and Interval Ownership for Peregrine Townhouses recorded at Reception Number 173556, Second Supplemental Declaration recorded July 8, 1999 as Reception No. 99006556 and any amendments and supplements thereto, all in the Office of the County Clerk and Recorder in and for Archuleta County, Colorado.

A 156,000/17,743,000 undivided fee simple absolute interest in Units 7859-7860 in Building 30, as tenants in common with the other undivided interest owners of said building of PEREGRINE TOWNHOUSES PHASE VI, as depicted on the Plat recorded at Reception Number 99011974, subject to Declaration of Protective Covenants and Interval Ownership for Peregrine Townhouses recorded at Reception Number 173556, Second Supplemental Declaration recorded July 8, 1999 as Reception No. 99006556 and any amendments and supplements thereto, all in the Office of the County Clerk and Recorder in and for Archuleta County, Colorado.

A 63,000/17,743,000 undivided fee simple absolute interest in Units 7863-7864 in Building 32, as tenants in common with the other undivided interest owners of said building of PEREGRINE TOWNHOUSES PHASE VII, as depicted on the Plat recorded at Reception Number 20005495, subject to Declaration of Protective Covenants and Interval Ownership for Peregrine Townhouses recorded at Reception Number 173556, Third Supplemental Declaration recorded March 13, 2000 as Reception No. 20002414 and any amendments and supplements thereto, all in the Office of the County Clerk and Recorder in and for Archuleta County, Colorado.

A 126,000/17,743,000 undivided fee simple absolute interest in Units 7835-7836 in Building 18, as tenants in common with the other undivided interest owners of said building of PEREGRINE TOWNHOUSES PHASE IV, as depicted on the Plat recorded at Reception Number 98002629, subject to Declaration of Protective Covenants and Interval Ownership for Peregrine Townhouses recorded at Reception Number 173556, First Supplemental Declaration recorded April 8, 1998 as Reception No. 98002628 and any amendments and supplements thereto, all in the Office of the County Clerk and Recorder in and for Archuleta County, Colorado.

A 182,000/17,743,000 undivided fee simple absolute interest in Units 7823-7824 in Building 12, as tenants in common with the other undivided interest owners of said building of PEREGRINE TOWNHOUSES PHASE IV, as depicted on the Plat recorded at Reception Number 98002629, subject to Declaration of Protective Covenants and Interval Ownership for Peregrine Townhouses recorded at Reception Number 173556, First Supplemental Declaration recorded April 8, 1998 as Reception No. 98002628 and any amendments and supplements thereto, all in the Office of the County Clerk and Recorder in and for Archuleta County, Colorado.

DATED this 21st day of July, 2008.

SHAND, NEWBOLD & CHAPMAN, P.C.

Original signature on file at the office of

Shand, Newbold & Chapman, P.C.

/s/ Keith Newbold

Keith Newbold, Esq., Reg. No. 010629

Attorney for Plaintiff

150 East 9th Street, Suite 400

P.O. Box 2790

Durango, CO 81302

(970) 247-3091

This Summons is issued pursuant to Rule 4(g), Colorado Rules of Civil Procedure.

Published August 7, 14, 21, 28 and September 4, 2008 in The Pagosa Springs SUN.

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COMBINED NOTICE OF SALE AND RIGHT TO CURE OR REDEEM

To Whom it may concern: This Notice is given with regard to the following described Deed of Trust:

Public Trustee’s Foreclosure Sale No. 59-2008 was commenced on 6-3-08 in the office of the undersigned Public Trustee relating to the Deed of Trust described below:

Ryan Clark and April Clark Original Grantor(s)

Argent Mortgage Company, LLC Original Beneficiary

US Bank National Association, as Trustee for the registered holders of Asset-Backed Pass-Through Certificates Series 2007-AMC2 Current Holder of Evidence of Debt

November 15, 2006 Date of Deed of Trust

Archuleta County of Recording

November 27, 2006 Recording Date of Deed of Trust:

At Reception No. 20611394 Recording Information Receipt No. and/or Book No. and Page No.

$166,600.00 Original Principal Balance

$165,520.02 Outstanding Principal Balance

Pursuant to C.R.S. § 38-38-101(4)(i), you are hereby notified that the covenants of the Deed of Trust have been violated as follows: Failure to pay principal and interest when due together with all other payments provided for in the Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust and other violations thereof.

THE LIEN FORECLOSED MAY NOT BE A FIRST LIEN.

THE PROPERTY DESCRIBED HEREIN IS ALL OF THE PROPERTY CURRENTLY ENCUMBERED BY THE LIEN OF THE DEED OF TRUST.

LOT 551, PAGOSA VISTA, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF FILED FOR RECORD SEPTEMBER 13, 1971 AS RECEPTION NO. 74884

COUNTY OF ARCHULETA, STATE OF COLORADO

WHICH HAS THE ADDRESS OF 116 Port Avenue Pagosa Springs, CO 81147

NOTICE OF SALE

The current Holder of the Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust described herein, has filed written election and demand for sale as provided by law and in said Deed of Trust.

THEREFORE, Notice Is Herby Given that I will at public action at 10:00 a.m. on September 25, 2008, at at the front door of the Archuleta County Public Trustee’s Office, 449 San Juan Street, Pagosa Springs, Colorado, sell to the highest and best bidder for cash, the said real property and all interest of the said Grantor(s), Grantor(s)’ heirs and assigns therein, for the purpose of paying the indebtedness provided in said Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust, plus attorney’s fees, the expenses of sale, and other items allowed by law, and will deliver to the purchaser a Certificate of Purchase, all as provided by law.

NOTICE OF RIGHTS

YOU MAY HAVE AN INTEREST IN THE REAL PROPERTY BEING FORECLOSED, OR HAVE CERTAIN RIGHTS OR SUFFER CERTAIN LIABILITIES PURSUANT TO COLORADO STATUTES AS A RESULT OF SAID FORECLOSURE. YOU MAY HAVE THE RIGHT TO REDEEM SAID REAL PROPERTY OR YOU MAY HAVE THE RIGHT TO CURE A DEFAULT UNDER THE DEED OF TRUST BEING FORECLOSED. A COPY OF SAID STATUTES, AS SUCH STATUTES ARE PRESENTLY CONSTITUTED, WHICH MAY AFFECT YOUR RIGHTS, IS ATTACHED TO THIS NOTICE. HOWEVER, YOUR RIGHTS MAY BE DETERMINED BY PREVIOUS STATUTES.

A NOTICE OF INTENT TO CURE FILED PURSUANT TO C.R.S. 38-38-104 SHALL BE FILED WITH THE PUBLIC TRUSTEE AT LEAST FIFTEEN (15) CALENDAR DAYS PRIOR TO THE FIRST SCHEDULED SALE DATE OR ANY DATE TO WHICH THE SALE IS CONTINUED.

A NOTICE OF INTENT TO REDEEM FILED PURSUANT TO C.R.S. 38-38-302 SHALL BE FILED WITH THE PUBLIC TRUSTEE NO LATER THAN EIGHT (8) BUSINESS DAYS AFTER THE SALE.

DATE: 6-3-08

/s/ Lois Baker

Public Trustee of Archuleta County, State of Colorado

/s/ Vicky Rudock, Deputy

By: Lois Baker, Public Trustee

The name, address and telephone number of the attorneys representing the legal holder of the indebtedness is:

Caren Jacobs Castle #11790

Deanne R. Stodden #33214

Elizabeth S. Marcus #16092

Barbara A. Bader #10394

Jennifer C. Rogers #34682

Britney Beall-Eder #34935

P.C. Wolf #34797

Katharine E. Fisher #39230

Lauren R. Smith #39316

Jeremy D. Peck #36588

Castle Meinhold & Stawiarski, LLC, 999 18th Street, Suite 2201, Denver, CO 80202, (303) 865-1400

THE ATTORNEY ABOVE IS ACTING AS A DEBT COLLECTOR AND IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION PROVIDED MAY BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE.

Published July 31, August 7, 14, 21 and 28, 2008 in The Pagosa Springs SUN.

_______________________

COMBINED NOTICE OF SALE AND RIGHT TO CURE OR REDEEM

To Whom it may concern: This Notice is given with regard to the following described Deed of Trust:

Public Trustee’s Foreclosure Sale No. 60-2008 was commenced on 6-3-08 in the office of the undersigned Public Trustee relating to the Deed of Trust described below:

Duane Breman and Amanda Breman Original Grantor(s)

Option One Mortgage Corporation Original Beneficiary

Wells Fargo Bank, N.A., as Trustee for the Certificateholders of Soundview Home Loan Trust 2007-OPT5, Asset-Backed Certificates, Series 2007-OPT5 Current Holder of Evidence of Debt

June 8, 2007 Date of Deed of Trust

Archuleta County of Recording

June 26, 2007 Recording Date of Deed of Trust:

At Reception No. 20705644 Recording Information Receipt No. and/or Book No. and Page No.

$729,000.00 Original Principal Balance

$728,222.57 Outstanding Principal Balance

Pursuant to C.R.S. § 38-38-101(4)(i), you are hereby notified that the covenants of the Deed of Trust have been violated as follows: Failure to pay principal and interest when due together with all other payments provided for in the Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust and other violations thereof.

THE LIEN FORECLOSED MAY NOT BE A FIRST LIEN.

THE PROPERTY DESCRIBED HEREIN IS ALL OF THE PROPERTY CURRENTLY ENCUMBERED BY THE LIEN OF THE DEED OF TRUST.

SEE EXHIBIT A ATTACHED HERETO AND INCORPORATED HEREIN BY REFERENCE

Exhibit “A”

The land referred to in this Commitment is described as follows:

ALL THE REAL PROPERTY TOGETHER WITH IMPROVEMENTS, IF ANY, LYING AND BEING IN THE COUNTY OF ARCHULETA AND STATE OF COLORADO, DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS:

THE EAST HALF OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER OF THE NORTHWEST QUARTER (E 1/2 NE 1/4 NW 1/4) OF SECTION 8, TOWNSHIP 34 NORTH, RANGE 1 WEST, N.M.P.M., ARCHULETA COUNTY, COLORADO, MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS. TO-WIT: BEGINNING AT THE NORTH QUARTER CORNER OF SAID SECTION 8, THENCE SOUTH 1320.00 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 89 DEGREES 52’30” WEST 657.61 FEET; THENCE NORTH 1316.36 FEET; THENCE NORTH 89 DEGREES 43’ EAST 657.45 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING.

Parcel/Tax I.D. # 588708200002

Commonly known as: 4821 F Highway 84, Pagosa Springs, CO 81147

WHICH HAS THE ADDRESS OF 4821 F Highway 84 Pagosa Springs, CO 81147

NOTICE OF SALE

The current Holder of the Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust described herein, has filed written election and demand for sale as provided by law and in said Deed of Trust.

THEREFORE, Notice Is Herby Given that I will at public action at 10:00 a.m. on September 25, 2008, at at the front door of the Archuleta County Public Trustee’s Office, 449 San Juan Street, Pagosa Springs, Colorado, sell to the highest and best bidder for cash, the said real property and all interest of the said Grantor(s), Grantor(s)’ heirs and assigns therein, for the purpose of paying the indebtedness provided in said Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust, plus attorney’s fees, the expenses of sale, and other items allowed by law, and will deliver to the purchaser a Certificate of Purchase, all as provided by law.

NOTICE OF RIGHTS

YOU MAY HAVE AN INTEREST IN THE REAL PROPERTY BEING FORECLOSED, OR HAVE CERTAIN RIGHTS OR SUFFER CERTAIN LIABILITIES PURSUANT TO COLORADO STATUTES AS A RESULT OF SAID FORECLOSURE. YOU MAY HAVE THE RIGHT TO REDEEM SAID REAL PROPERTY OR YOU MAY HAVE THE RIGHT TO CURE A DEFAULT UNDER THE DEED OF TRUST BEING FORECLOSED. A COPY OF SAID STATUTES, AS SUCH STATUTES ARE PRESENTLY CONSTITUTED, WHICH MAY AFFECT YOUR RIGHTS, IS ATTACHED TO THIS NOTICE. HOWEVER, YOUR RIGHTS MAY BE DETERMINED BY PREVIOUS STATUTES.

A NOTICE OF INTENT TO CURE FILED PURSUANT TO C.R.S. 38-38-104 SHALL BE FILED WITH THE PUBLIC TRUSTEE AT LEAST FIFTEEN (15) CALENDAR DAYS PRIOR TO THE FIRST SCHEDULED SALE DATE OR ANY DATE TO WHICH THE SALE IS CONTINUED.

A NOTICE OF INTENT TO REDEEM FILED PURSUANT TO C.R.S. 38-38-302 SHALL BE FILED WITH THE PUBLIC TRUSTEE NO LATER THAN EIGHT (8) BUSINESS DAYS AFTER THE SALE.

DATE: 6-3-08

/s/ Lois Baker

Public Trustee of Archuleta County, State of Colorado

/s/ Vicky Rudock, Deputy

By: Lois Baker, Public Trustee

The name, address and telephone number of the attorneys representing the legal holder of the indebtedness is:

Caren Jacobs Castle #11790

Deanne R. Stodden #33214

Elizabeth S. Marcus #16092

Barbara A. Bader #10394

Jennifer C. Rogers #34682

Britney Beall-Eder #34935

P.C. Wolf #34797

Katharine E. Fisher #39230

Lauren R. Smith #39316

Jeremy D. Peck #36588

Castle Meinhold & Stawiarski, LLC, 999 18th Street, Suite 2201, Denver, CO 80202, (303) 865-1400

THE ATTORNEY ABOVE IS ACTING AS A DEBT COLLECTOR AND IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION PROVIDED MAY BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE.

Published July 31, August 7, 14, 21 and 28, 2008 in The Pagosa Springs SUN.

_______________________

COMBINED NOTICE OF SALE AND RIGHT TO CURE OR REDEEM

To Whom it may concern: This Notice is given with regard to the following described Deed of Trust:

Public Trustee’s Foreclosure Sale No. 61-2008 was commenced on 6-3-08 in the office of the undersigned Public Trustee relating to the Deed of Trust described below:

Breanna J. Kirsop Original Grantor(s)

Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as nominee for Homecomings Financial Network Inc. Original Beneficiary

GMAC Mortgage, LLC Current Holder of Evidence of Debt

November 22, 2005 Date of Deed of Trust

Archuleta County of Recording

November 29, 2005 Recording Date of Deed of Trust:

At Reception No. 20512717 Recording Information Receipt No. and/or Book No. and Page No.

$108,800.00 Original Principal Balance

$106,716.44 Outstanding Principal Balance

Pursuant to C.R.S. § 38-38-101(4)(i), you are hereby notified that the covenants of the Deed of Trust have been violated as follows: Failure to pay principal and interest when due together with all other payments provided for in the Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust and other violations thereof.

THE LIEN FORECLOSED MAY NOT BE A FIRST LIEN.

THE PROPERTY DESCRIBED HEREIN IS ALL OF THE PROPERTY CURRENTLY ENCUMBERED BY THE LIEN OF THE DEED OF TRUST.

LOT 14, BLOCK 21, LAKE PAGOSA PARK, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF FILED MARCH 13, 1970, AS RECEPTION NOS. 72998 THRU 73013, IN THE OFFICE OF THE CLERK AND RECORDER, ARCHULETA COUNTY, COLORADO.

WHICH HAS THE ADDRESS OF 42 West Radiant Court Pagosa Springs, CO 81147

NOTICE OF SALE

The current Holder of the Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust described herein, has filed written election and demand for sale as provided by law and in said Deed of Trust.

THEREFORE, Notice Is Herby Given that I will at public action at 10:00 a.m. on September 25, 2008, at at the front door of the Archuleta County Public Trustee’s Office, 449 San Juan Street,Pagosa Springs, Colorado, sell to the highest and best bidder for cash, the said real property and all interest of the said Grantor(s), Grantor(s)’ heirs and assigns therein, for the purpose of paying the indebtedness provided in said Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust, plus attorney’s fees, the expenses of sale, and other items allowed by law, and will deliver to the purchaser a Certificate of Purchase, all as provided by law.

NOTICE OF RIGHTS

YOU MAY HAVE AN INTEREST IN THE REAL PROPERTY BEING FORECLOSED, OR HAVE CERTAIN RIGHTS OR SUFFER CERTAIN LIABILITIES PURSUANT TO COLORADO STATUTES AS A RESULT OF SAID FORECLOSURE. YOU MAY HAVE THE RIGHT TO REDEEM SAID REAL PROPERTY OR YOU MAY HAVE THE RIGHT TO CURE A DEFAULT UNDER THE DEED OF TRUST BEING FORECLOSED. A COPY OF SAID STATUTES, AS SUCH STATUTES ARE PRESENTLY CONSTITUTED, WHICH MAY AFFECT YOUR RIGHTS, IS ATTACHED TO THIS NOTICE. HOWEVER, YOUR RIGHTS MAY BE DETERMINED BY PREVIOUS STATUTES.

A NOTICE OF INTENT TO CURE FILED PURSUANT TO C.R.S. 38-38-104 SHALL BE FILED WITH THE PUBLIC TRUSTEE AT LEAST FIFTEEN (15) CALENDAR DAYS PRIOR TO THE FIRST SCHEDULED SALE DATE OR ANY DATE TO WHICH THE SALE IS CONTINUED.

A NOTICE OF INTENT TO REDEEM FILED PURSUANT TO C.R.S. 38-38-302 SHALL BE FILED WITH THE PUBLIC TRUSTEE NO LATER THAN EIGHT (8) BUSINESS DAYS AFTER THE SALE.

DATE: 6-3-08

/s/ Lois Baker

Public Trustee of Archuleta County, State of Colorado

/s/ Vicky Rudock, Deputy

By: Lois Baker, Public Trustee

The name, address and telephone number of the attorneys representing the legal holder of the indebtedness is:

Caren Jacobs Castle #11790

Deanne R. Stodden #33214

Elizabeth S. Marcus #16092

Barbara A. Bader #10394

Jennifer C. Rogers #34682

Britney Beall-Eder #34935

P.C. Wolf #34797

Katharine E. Fisher #39230

Lauren R. Smith #39316

Jeremy D. Peck #36588

Castle Meinhold & Stawiarski, LLC, 999 18th Street, Suite 2201, Denver, CO 80202, (303) 865-1400

THE ATTORNEY ABOVE IS ACTING AS A DEBT COLLECTOR AND IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION PROVIDED MAY BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE.

Published July 31, August 7, 14, 21 and 28, 2008 in The Pagosa Springs SUN.

_______________________

PUBLIC NOTICE

District Court, County of ARCHULETA

State of Colorado

Court Address: P.O. Box 148

449 San Juan Street

Pagosa Springs, CO 81147

Plaintiff(s):

Elk Run Property Owners Association, Inc.

v.

Defendant(s):

(1) Myron Malmberg a/k/a Myron L. Malmberg

(2) Unknowns: All Unknown Spouses Of Any Party

Hereto, And All Other Persons Living Or Dead

Whose Names Are Unknown, Who Claim Any

Interest in The Subject Real Estate

Philip M. Kleinsmith

Kleinsmith & Associates, P.C.

6035 Erin Park Drive, Suite 203

Colorado Springs, CO 80918

Phone: (719) 593-1970

Fax: (719) 593-2193

Email: klein@frii.com

Bar #: 1063

Case Number _____

Div.______

Summons

TO EACH DEFENDANT NAMED ABOVE:

A lawsuit has been started against you in the above entitled court by the above named Plaintiff or Plaintiffs. Plaintiff’s claims are stated in a written Complaint and Petition for Money Judgment for HOA Assessments and Foreclosure Thereof (Complaint), a copy of which is served upon you with this Summons, if service hereof is by a method of personal service. If service hereof is by publication, a copy of the Complaint is available from the Court Clerk and/or the Plaintiff’s attorney whose addresses and phone numbers are indicated above.

In order to defend against this lawsuit, you must respond to the Complaint by stating your defense(s) in writing and by filing same with the Clerk of the Court (by mail, if you wish) and mailing a copy to the Plaintiff’s attorney. Your written response must in certain instances state any related claim(s) which you may have against any other party hereto or you may be barred from making such claim(s) in any other lawsuit. If you do not respond in writing, a default judgment may be entered against you without notice. A default judgment is one where the Plaintiff may be entitled to what they ask for because you have not responded.

Your written response must be filed (by mail, if you wish) with the Clerk of the Court and mailed to Plaintiff’s attorney within thirty (30) days after the date you are personally served with this Summons by a method of personal service or within thirty (30) days of the last publication of this Summons, if it is published. If you wish to seek the advice of an attorney, you should do so promptly so that your written response, if any, may be served on time.

This lawsuit requests a money judgment, the foreclosure of a Homeowners Assessment Lien against and quieting title to the following Real Estate and all improvements thereto:

Real Estate:

Common Description: Unit Week Number 23, Unit Number 7101, Building Number 1, Elk Run Townhouses, Archuleta County, Colorado.

Legal Description: Unit Week Number 23, Unit Number 7101, Building Number 1 in “ELK RUN TOWNHOUSES”, according to and as located on the recorded Map recorded thereof filed for record June 26, 1986 as Reception No. 140480, and in accordance with and as limited and defined by the Declaration of Protective Covenants and Interval Ownership recorded June 26, 1986 as Reception No. 140481, First Amendment thereto recorded August 13, 1986 under Reception No. 141512 and Second Amendment recorded December 1, 1987 as Reception No. 151976, Archuleta County, Colorado.

In this lawsuit, the Plaintiff alleges that the following Defendants have personal liability on the subject Mortgage or Deed of Trust and Note and the requested money judgment: Myron Malmberg a/k/a Myron L. Malmberg.

Dated: May 21, 2008.

Kleinsmith & Associates, P.C.

Attorney for Plaintiff

By /s/ Philip M. Kleinsmith

Philip M. Kleinsmith, #1063 THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE.

REASONABLE ACCOMMODATIONS WILL BE PROVIDED IN ACCORD WITH THE AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT.

Published July 24, 31, August 7, 14 and 21, 2008 in The Pagosa Springs SUN.

_______________________

District Court, County of ARCHULETA

State of Colorado

Court Address: P.O. Box 148

449 San Juan Street

Pagosa Springs, CO 81147

Plaintiff(s):

Village Pointe Property Owners Association, Inc.

v.

Defendant(s):

(1) Sandra Hullum

(2) Michael Hullum

(3) Unknowns: All Unknown Spouses Of Any Party

Hereto, And All Other Persons Living Or Dead

Whose Names Are Unknown, Who Claim Any

Interest in The Subject Real Estate

Philip M. Kleinsmith

Kleinsmith & Associates, P.C.

6035 Erin Park Drive, Suite 203

Colorado Springs, CO 80918

Phone: (719) 593-1970

Fax: (719) 593-2193

Email: klein@frii.com

Bar #: 1063

Case Number ____

Div.______

Amended Summons

TO EACH DEFENDANT NAMED ABOVE:

A lawsuit has been started against you in the above entitled court by the above named Plaintiff or Plaintiffs. Plaintiff’s claims are stated in a written Complaint and Petition for Money Judgment for HOA Assessments and Foreclosure Thereof (Complaint), a copy of which is served upon you with this Summons, if service hereof is by a method of personal service. If service hereof is by publication, a copy of the Complaint is available from the Court Clerk and/or the Plaintiff’s attorney whose addresses and phone numbers are indicated above.

In order to defend against this lawsuit, you must respond to the Complaint by stating your defense(s) in writing and by filing same with the Clerk of the Court (by mail, if you wish) and mailing a copy to the Plaintiff’s attorney. Your written response must in certain instances state any related claim(s) which you may have against any other party hereto or you may be barred from making such claim(s) in any other lawsuit. If you do not respond in writing, a default judgment may be entered against you without notice. A default judgment is one where the Plaintiff may be entitled to what they ask for because you have not responded.

Your written response must be filed (by mail, if you wish) with the Clerk of the Court and mailed to Plaintiff’s attorney within thirty (30) days after the date you are personally served with this Summons by a method of personal service or within thirty (30) days of the last publication of this Summons, if it is published. If you wish to seek the advice of an attorney, you should do so promptly so that your written response, if any, may be served on time.

This lawsuit requests a money judgment, the foreclosure of a Homeowners Assessment Lien against and quieting title to the following Real Estate and all improvements thereto:

Common Description: Unit Week Number 02, Condominium Unit Number 7508, Building Number 02, in Phase I of Village Pointe Condominiums, Archuleta County, Colorado.

Legal Description: Unit Week Number 02, Condominium Unit Number 7508, Building Number 02, in Phase I of Village Pointe Condominiums, according to and as located on the recorded Map recorded under Reception No. 168713 and the Declaration of Condominium and Interval Ownership of Village Pointe Condominiums recorded under Reception No. 160495, and amendments and supplements thereto, in the Office of the County Clerk, Archuleta County, Colorado.

In this lawsuit, the Plaintiff alleges that the following Defendants have personal liability on the subject Mortgage or Deed of Trust and Note and the requested money judgment: Sandra Hullum and Michael Hullum.

Dated: March 6, 2008.

Kleinsmith & Associates, P.C.

Attorney for Plaintiff

By /s/ Philip M. Kleinsmith

Philip M. Kleinsmith, #1063 THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE.

REASONABLE ACCOMMODATIONS WILL BE PROVIDED IN ACCORD WITH THE AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT.

Published July 24, 31, August 7, 14 and 21, 2008 in The Pagosa Springs SUN.

_______________________

District Court, County of ARCHULETA

State of Colorado

Court Address: P.O. Box 148

449 San Juan Street

Pagosa Springs, CO 81147

Plaintiff(s):

Elk Run Property Owners Association, Inc.

v.

Defendant(s):

(1) Karl Jeffery Petrie

(2) Mickie K. Petrie

(3) Unknowns: All Unknown Spouses Of Any Party

Hereto, And All Other Persons Living Or Dead

Whose Names Are Unknown, Who Claim Any

Interest in The Subject Real Estate

Philip M. Kleinsmith

Kleinsmith & Associates, P.C.

6035 Erin Park Drive, Suite 203

Colorado Springs, CO 80918

Phone: (719) 593-1970

Fax: (719) 593-2193

Email: klein@frii.com

Bar #: 1063

Case Number 08CV73

Div.______

NOTICES OF:

(1) LEVY AND RECORDING;

(2) RIGHT TO CLAIM EXEMPTION;

(3) RIGHT TO CURE AND/OR REDEEM;

(4) ELECTION OF SALE;

(5) SALE; AND

(6) GOVERNMENTAL CLAIMS YOU ARE NOTIFIED THAT:

All words and phrases which have the first letters thereof capitalized are defined on the attached Identifying Data of Legal Documents Upon Which foreclosure Is Based. The undersigned attorney certifies that to the best of his knowledge, the Judgment Debtor(s) and Current Owner(s) names and addresses are correct.

This proceeding for a Sheriff’s Sale (See Sheriff’s Identifying No. on attached Identifying Data, etc.) has been commenced in the office of the Sheriff of this County to foreclose the lien of the Mortgage, Deed of Trust and/or Judgment.

1. LEVY AND RECORDING: Judgment has been entered and a Writ of Execution has been issued by the above Court to the undersigned Sheriff to levy upon the Real Estate to be Sold, which is owed or was formerly owned by the Judgment Debtor(s), and to which the lien of the Lien Documents attached. Pursuant thereto, the undersigned Sheriff has levied upon or will levy upon the Real Estate to be Sold by recording these Notices in the appropriate real estate records.

2. RIGHT TO CLAIM EXEMPTION AND/OR ENJOIN: Within ten (10) days of the date of service hereof of the Judgment Debtor(s) and Current Owner(s), any one or more of them has a right to file with the Clerk of the above Court a written claim of exemption in the above case, which he, she or it may have by the laws of this State. At any time before this sale, Judgment Debtor(s), Current Owner(s), and other Interested Parties may have a right to enjoin this sale, if permitted by law. Failure to pursue these rights may be deemed a waiver thereof. The filing of a frivolous, groundless or vexatious lawsuit may result in attorney’s fees being assessed against you.

3. CURE AND/OR REDEMPTION RIGHTS: Pursuant to the laws of this State, you may have an interest in the Real Estate to be sold or have certain rights or suffer certain liabilities as a result of this Sheriff’s sale. You may have the right to cure a default under the judgment, or you may have a right to redeem the Real Estate to be Sold. A copy of said statutes, as such statutes are presently constituted, is attached to the copies hereof which are recorded, mailed and served.

The lien of the Lien Documents may not be a first lien.

A Notice of Intent to Cure filed pursuant to CRS 38-38-104 shall be filed with the Sheriff at least 15 calendar days prior to the first scheduled sale date or any date to which the sale is continued.

A Notice of Intent to Redeem filed pursuant to Section 38-38-302 shall be filed with the Sheriff no later than 8 business days after the sale.

4. ELECTION TO SELL: The Holder of the Judgment intends to have the Real Estate to be Sold by the undersigned Sheriff to partially or fully pay the lien of the Lien Documents. The effect of said sale will be to deprive all persons who claim an interest in the Real Estate of any right thereto, except as provided by law.

5. SALE: The Real Estate to be Sold, will be sold at public auction without warranties or guarantees at the following date, time and place:

Date of Sale: October 22, 2008

Place of Sale: Archuleta County

Sheriff’s Office, 449 San Juan Street, Pagosa Springs, CO

Time of Sale: 10:00 a.m. Sale No. 2008-25

6. GOVERNMENTAL CLAIMS: To the copies of these Notices which are recorded, mailed, and served, there are attached copies of the written recorded claim of any governmental agency against the Real Estate and the independent notices which the law requires to be mailed to any such governmental agency to terminate their rights to the Real Estate.

Kleinsmith & Associates, P.C.

Attorney for Holder of Judgment

Colorado Attorney Registration No. 1063

6035 Erin Park Dr., Ste. 203

Colorado Springs, CO 80918

1-800-842-8417 or (719) 593-1970

By /s/ Philip M. Kleinsmith

Dated: July 14, 2008.

Sheriff of the Above County

/s/ Peter L. Gonzales

Address: 449 San Juan Street

Pagosa Springs, CO 81147

Identifying Data of Legal Documents1 Upon Which Foreclosure is Based

Type of Sale (Trustee, Sheriff, Special Master) and That Person’s Identifying No., (if applicable: Sheriff’s Sale - 2008-25

Type of Documents Being Foreclosed (Mortgage, Deed of Trust2, Judgment or Other Lien Instrument): Judgment

Default(s) Causing Foreclosure: Failure to Pay Judgment

Projected Amounts Owed As of Foreclosure Sale Date: Principal: $3,170.50, Interest: $563.04, Costs (estimated): $2,500.00, Attorneys Fees (estimated): $875.00, Total (estimated): $7,108.54

Real Estate3 to be Sold: Common Description: Unit Week Number 17, Unit Number 7110, Building Number 03, Elk Run Townhouses, Archuleta County, Colorado.

Assessor’s Tax Parcel No.: Unknown

Legal Description: Unit Week Number 17, Unit Number 7110, Building Number 03 in “ELK RUN TOWNHOUSES”, according to and as located on the recorded Map recorded thereof filed for record June 26, 1986 as Reception No. 140480, and in accordance with and as limited and defined by the Declaration of Protective Covenants and Interval Ownership recorded June 26, 1986 as Reception No. 140481, First Amendment thereto recorded August 13, 1986 under Reception No. 141512 and Second Amendment recorded December 1, 1987 as Reception No. 151976, Archuleta County, Colorado.

Lien Documents: That is the Identifying Data of Legal Documents1 Being Foreclosed Per Real Estate Records of County Stated in Legal Description:

Mortgage or Deed of Trust: Dated: N/A

Judgment: Dated: 6/11/2008 Case No.: 2008CV73 Court: Archuleta County District Court

Transcript of Judgment: Dated: N/A

Writ of Execution: Dated: 6/24/2008

Other Lien Instrument: Dated: N/A

Recording Date: N/A

Recording Data: N/A

Original Principal Amount: $3,170.50

Original Trustee: N/A

Original Holder4 of Lien Documents: Name: Elk Run Property Owners Assoc., Inc. Address: c/o Foreclosure Management Company, 10975 El Monte, Suite 220, Overland Park, KS 66211

Present Holder of Lien Documents: Name: Elk Run Property Owners Assoc., Inc., Address: c/o Foreclosure Management Company, 10975 El Monte, Suite 220, Overland Park, KS 66211

Original Liable Parties5 on Lien Documents: Name(s): Karl Jeffery Petrie & Mickie K. Petrie Address: 2130 N. Rough Creek Ct., Granbury, TX 76048 and 3351 Lipan Hwy, Granbury, TX 76048

Judgment Debtor(s): Name(s): N/A - In Rem Only Address: N/A

Current Owner(s) of Real Estate: Name(s): Karl Jeffery Petrie & Mickie K. Petrie, Address: 2130 N. Rough Creek Ct., Granbury, TX 76048 and 3351 Lipan Hwy, Granbury, TX 76048

1Mortgage, Deed of Trust, Judgment, or other Lien Instrument.

2Sometimes called “Trust Indenture”.

3Sometimes called “Mortgaged Property”, “Trust Property”, or “Property”.

4Sometimes called “Mortgagee”, “Beneficiary”, “Judgment Creditor”, or “Creditor”.

5Sometimes called “Mortgagors”, “Grantors”, “Judgment Debtors”, or “Debtors”.

Published July 24, 31, August 7, 14 and 21, 2008 in The Pagosa Springs SUN.

_______________________

District Court, County of ARCHULETA

State of Colorado

Court Address: P.O. Box 148

449 San Juan Street

Pagosa Springs, CO 81147

Plaintiff(s):

Masters Place Condominiums Property Owners Association, Inc.

v.

Defendant(s):

(1) Estate of Paul L. Lewis

(2) Unknowns: All Unknown Spouses Of Any Party

Hereto, And All Other Persons Living Or Dead

Whose Names Are Unknown, Who Claim Any

Interest in The Subject Real Estate

Philip M. Kleinsmith

Kleinsmith & Associates, P.C.

6035 Erin Park Drive, Suite 203

Colorado Springs, CO 80918

Phone: (719) 593-1970

Fax: (719) 593-2193

Email: klein@frii.com

Bar #: 1063

Case Number 08CV70

Div.______

NOTICES OF:

(1) LEVY AND RECORDING;

(2) RIGHT TO CLAIM EXEMPTION;

(3) RIGHT TO CURE AND/OR REDEEM;

(4) ELECTION OF SALE;

(5) SALE; AND

(6) GOVERNMENTAL CLAIMS YOU ARE NOTIFIED THAT:

All words and phrases which have the first letters thereof capitalized are defined on the attached Identifying Data of Legal Documents Upon Which foreclosure Is Based. The undersigned attorney certifies that to the best of his knowledge, the Judgment Debtor(s) and Current Owner(s) names and addresses are correct.

This proceeding for a Sheriff’s Sale (See Sheriff’s Identifying No. on attached Identifying Data, etc.) has been commenced in the office of the Sheriff of this County to foreclose the lien of the Mortgage, Deed of Trust and/or Judgment.

1. LEVY AND RECORDING: Judgment has been entered and a Writ of Execution has been issued by the above Court to the undersigned Sheriff to levy upon the Real Estate to be Sold, which is owed or was formerly owned by the Judgment Debtor(s), and to which the lien of the Lien Documents attached. Pursuant thereto, the undersigned Sheriff has levied upon or will levy upon the Real Estate to be Sold by recording these Notices in the appropriate real estate records.

2. RIGHT TO CLAIM EXEMPTION AND/OR ENJOIN: Within ten (10) days of the date of service hereof of the Judgment Debtor(s) and Current Owner(s), any one or more of them has a right to file with the Clerk of the above Court a written claim of exemption in the above case, which he, she or it may have by the laws of this State. At any time before this sale, Judgment Debtor(s), Current Owner(s), and other Interested Parties may have a right to enjoin this sale, if permitted by law. Failure to pursue these rights may be deemed a waiver thereof. The filing of a frivolous, groundless or vexatious lawsuit may result in attorney’s fees being assessed against you.

3. CURE AND/OR REDEMPTION RIGHTS: Pursuant to the laws of this State, you may have an interest in the Real Estate to be sold or have certain rights or suffer certain liabilities as a result of this Sheriff’s sale. You may have the right to cure a default under the judgment, or you may have a right to redeem the Real Estate to be Sold. A copy of said statutes, as such statutes are presently constituted, is attached to the copies hereof which are recorded, mailed and served.

The lien of the Lien Documents may not be a first lien.

A Notice of Intent to Cure filed pursuant to CRS 38-38-104 shall be filed with the Sheriff at least 15 calendar days prior to the first scheduled sale date or any date to which the sale is continued.

A Notice of Intent to Redeem filed pursuant to Section 38-38-302 shall be filed with the Sheriff no later than 8 business days after the sale.

4. ELECTION TO SELL: The Holder of the Judgment intends to have the Real Estate to be Sold by the undersigned Sheriff to partially or fully pay the lien of the Lien Documents. The effect of said sale will be to deprive all persons who claim an interest in the Real Estate of any right thereto, except as provided by law.

5. SALE: The Real Estate to be Sold, will be sold at public auction without warranties or guarantees at the following date, time and place:

Date of Sale: October 22, 2008

Place of Sale: Archuleta County

Sheriff’s Office, 449 San Juan Street, Pagosa Springs, CO

Time of Sale: 10:00 a.m.

Sale No. 2008-23

6. GOVERNMENTAL CLAIMS: To the copies of these Notices which are recorded, mailed, and served, there are attached copies of the written recorded claim of any governmental agency against the Real Estate and the independent notices which the law requires to be mailed to any such governmental agency to terminate their rights to the Real Estate.

Kleinsmith & Associates, P.C.

Attorney for Holder of Judgment

Colorado Attorney Registration No. 1063

6035 Erin Park Dr., Ste. 203

Colorado Springs, CO 80918

1-800-842-8417 or (719) 593-1970

By /s/ Philip M. Kleinsmith

Dated: July 14, 2008.

Sheriff of the Above County

/s/ Peter L. Gonzales

Address: 449 San Juan Street

Pagosa Springs, CO 81147

Identifying Data of Legal Documents1 Upon Which Foreclosure is Based

Type of Sale (Trustee, Sheriff, Special Master) and That Person’s Identifying No., (if applicable: Sheriff’s Sale - 2008-23

Type of Documents Being Foreclosed (Mortgage, Deed of Trust2, Judgment or Other Lien Instrument): Judgment

Default(s) Causing Foreclosure: Failure to Pay Judgment

Projected Amounts Owed As of Foreclosure Sale Date: Principal: $4,218.00, Interest: $696.80, Costs (estimated): $2,500.00, Attorneys Fees (estimated): $875.00, Total (estimated): $8,289.80

Real Estate3 to be Sold: Common Description: Unit Week Number 04, Condominium Unit Number 7311, Building Number 02 of Masters Place Condominiums Phase I, Archuleta County, Colorado.

Assessor’s Tax Parcel No.: Unknown

Legal Description: Unit Week Numbers 04, Condominium Unit Number 7311, Building Number 02 of Masters Place Condominiums Phase I, according to the Condominium Map recorded under Reception Number 161539, and the Declaration for Masters Place Condominiums recorded under Reception Number 0161911, and amendments and supplements thereto in the Office of the County Clerk and Recorder in and for Archuleta County, Colorado.

Lien Documents: That is the Identifying Data of Legal Documents1 Being Foreclosed Per Real Estate Records of County Stated in Legal Description:

Mortgage or Deed of Trust: Dated: N/A

Judgment: Dated: 5/19/2008 Case No.: 2008CV70 Court: Archuleta County District Court

Transcript of Judgment: Dated: N/A

Writ of Execution: Dated: 6/23/2008

Other Lien Instrument: Dated: N/A

Recording Date: N/A

Recording Data: N/A

Original Principal Amount: $4,218.00

Original Trustee : N/A

Original Holder4 of Lien Documents: Name: Masters Place Condominiums Property Owners Association, Inc. Address: c/o Foreclosure Management Company, 10975 El Monte, Suite 220, Overland Park, KS 66211

Present Holder of Lien Documents: Name: Masters Place Condominiums Property Owners Association, Inc. Address: c/o Foreclosure Management Company, 10975 El Monte, Suite 220, Overland Park, KS 66211

Original Liable Parties5 on Lien Documents: Name(s): Paul L. Lewis Address: 11400 S. Indian Meridian, Newalla, OK 74857

Judgment Debtor(s): Name(s): N/A - In Rem Only Address: N/A

Current Owner(s) of Real Estate: Name(s): Estate of Paul L. Lewis Address: c/o Melissa K. Mast, P.R., 11400 S. Indian Meridian, Newalla, OK 74857

1Mortgage, Deed of Trust, Judgment, or other Lien Instrument.

2Sometimes called “Trust Indenture”.

3Sometimes called “Mortgaged Property”, “Trust Property”, or “Property”.

4Sometimes called “Mortgagee”, “Beneficiary”, “Judgment Creditor”, or “Creditor”.

5Sometimes called “Mortgagors”, “Grantors”, “Judgment Debtors”, or “Debtors”.

Published July 24, 31, August 7, 14 and 21, 2008 in The Pagosa Springs SUN.

_______________________

District Court, County of ARCHULETA

State of Colorado

Court Address: P.O. Box 148

449 San Juan Street

Pagosa Springs, CO 81147

Plaintiff(s):

Ptarmigan Property Owners Association, Inc.

v.

Defendant(s):

(1) Duvall Truelsen

(2) Deanna E. Truelsen

(3) Unknowns: All Unknown Spouses Of Any Party

Hereto, And All Other Persons Living Or Dead

Whose Names Are Unknown, Who Claim Any

Interest in The Subject Real Estate

Philip M. Kleinsmith

Kleinsmith & Associates, P.C.

6035 Erin Park Drive, Suite 203

Colorado Springs, CO 80918

Phone: (719) 593-1970

Fax: (719) 593-2193

Email: klein@frii.com

Bar #: 1063

Case Number 08CV59

Div.______

NOTICES OF:

(1) LEVY AND RECORDING;

(2) RIGHT TO CLAIM EXEMPTION;

(3) RIGHT TO CURE AND/OR REDEEM;

(4) ELECTION OF SALE;

(5) SALE; AND

(6) GOVERNMENTAL CLAIMS YOU ARE NOTIFIED THAT:

All words and phrases which have the first letters thereof capitalized are defined on the attached Identifying Data of Legal Documents Upon Which foreclosure Is Based. The undersigned attorney certifies that to the best of his knowledge, the Judgment Debtor(s) and Current Owner(s) names and addresses are correct.

This proceeding for a Sheriff’s Sale (See Sheriff’s Identifying No. on attached Identifying Data, etc.) has been commenced in the office of the Sheriff of this County to foreclose the lien of the Mortgage, Deed of Trust and/or Judgment.

1. LEVY AND RECORDING: Judgment has been entered and a Writ of Execution has been issued by the above Court to the undersigned Sheriff to levy upon the Real Estate to be Sold, which is owed or was formerly owned by the Judgment Debtor(s), and to which the lien of the Lien Documents attached. Pursuant thereto, the undersigned Sheriff has levied upon or will levy upon the Real Estate to be Sold by recording these Notices in the appropriate real estate records.

2. RIGHT TO CLAIM EXEMPTION AND/OR ENJOIN: Within ten (10) days of the date of service hereof of the Judgment Debtor(s) and Current Owner(s), any one or more of them has a right to file with the Clerk of the above Court a written claim of exemption in the above case, which he, she or it may have by the laws of this State. At any time before this sale, Judgment Debtor(s), Current Owner(s), and other Interested Parties may have a right to enjoin this sale, if permitted by law. Failure to pursue these rights may be deemed a waiver thereof. The filing of a frivolous, groundless or vexatious lawsuit may result in attorney’s fees being assessed against you.

3. CURE AND/OR REDEMPTION RIGHTS: Pursuant to the laws of this State, you may have an interest in the Real Estate to be sold or have certain rights or suffer certain liabilities as a result of this Sheriff’s sale. You may have the right to cure a default under the judgment, or you may have a right to redeem the Real Estate to be Sold. A copy of said statutes, as such statutes are presently constituted, is attached to the copies hereof which are recorded, mailed and served.

The lien of the Lien Documents may not be a first lien.

A Notice of Intent to Cure filed pursuant to CRS 38-38-104 shall be filed with the Sheriff at least 15 calendar days prior to the first scheduled sale date or any date to which the sale is continued.

A Notice of Intent to Redeem filed pursuant to Section 38-38-302 shall be filed with the Sheriff no later than 8 business days after the sale.

4. ELECTION TO SELL: The Holder of the Judgment intends to have the Real Estate to be Sold by the undersigned Sheriff to partially or fully pay the lien of the Lien Documents. The effect of said sale will be to deprive all persons who claim an interest in the Real Estate of any right thereto, except as provided by law.

5. SALE: The Real Estate to be Sold, will be sold at public auction without warranties or guarantees at the following date, time and place:

Date of Sale: October 22, 2008

Place of Sale: Archuleta County

Sheriff’s Office, 449 San Juan Street, Pagosa Springs, CO

Time of Sale: 10:00 a.m.

Sale No. 2008-22

6. GOVERNMENTAL CLAIMS: To the copies of these Notices which are recorded, mailed, and served, there are attached copies of the written recorded claim of any governmental agency against the Real Estate and the independent notices which the law requires to be mailed to any such governmental agency to terminate their rights to the Real Estate.

Kleinsmith & Associates, P.C.

Attorney for Holder of Judgment

Colorado Attorney Registration No. 1063

6035 Erin Park Dr., Ste. 203

Colorado Springs, CO 80918

1-800-842-8417 or (719) 593-1970

By /s/ Philip M. Kleinsmith

Dated: July 14, 2008.

Sheriff of the Above County

/s/ Peter L. Gonzales

Address: 449 San Juan Street

Pagosa Springs, CO 81147

Identifying Data of Legal Documents1 Upon Which Foreclosure is Based

Type of Sale (Trustee, Sheriff, Special Master) and That Person’s Identifying No., (if applicable: Sheriff’s Sale - 2008-22

Type of Documents Being Foreclosed (Mortgage, Deed of Trust2, Judgment or Other Lien Instrument): Judgment

Default(s) Causing Foreclosure: Failure to Pay Judgment

Projected Amounts Owed As of Foreclosure Sale Date: Principal: $3,980.00, Interest: $657.94, Costs (estimated): $2,500.00, Attorneys Fees (estimated): $875.00, Total (estimated): $8,012.94

Real Estate3 to be Sold: Common Description: Unit Week Number 15, Unit Number 7219, Building Number 10, Ptarmigan Townhouses Phase III, Archuleta County, Colorado.

Assessor’s Tax Parcel No.: Unknown

Legal Description: Unit Week Number 15, Unit Number 7219, Building Number 10, in Ptarmigan Townhouses Phase III, as recorded under Reception No. 156202, subject to Declaration of Individual and/or Interval Ownership for Ptarmigan Townhouses recorded under Reception No. 153557, and amendments and supplements thereto, in the Office of the County Clerk and Recorded in and for Archuleta County, Colorado.

Lien Documents: That is the Identifying Data of Legal Documents1 Being Foreclosed Per Real Estate Records of County Stated in Legal Description:

Mortgage or Deed of Trust: Dated: N/A

Judgment: Dated: 6/2/2008 Case No.: 2008CV59 Court: Archuleta County District Court

Transcript of Judgment: Dated: N/A

Writ of Execution: Dated: 6/20/2008

Other Lien Instrument: Dated: N/A

Recording Date: N/A

Recording Data: N/A

Original Principal Amount: $3,980.00

Original Trustee: N/A

Original Holder4 of Lien Documents: Name: Ptarmigan Property Owners Assoc., Inc. Address: c/o Foreclosure Management Company, 10975 El Monte, Suite 220, Overland Park, KS 66211

Present Holder of Lien Documents: Name: Ptarmigan Property Owners Assoc., Inc Address: c/o Foreclosure Management Company, 10975 El Monte, Suite 220, Overland Park, KS 66211

Original Liable Parties5on Lien Documents: Name(s): Duvall Truelsen and Deanna E. Truelsen Address: 206 Central Ave., Dolores, CO 81323

Judgment Debtor(s): Name(s): N/A - In Rem Only Address: N/A

Current Owner(s) of Real Estate: Name(s): Duvall Truelsen and Deanna E. Truelsen Address: 206 Central Ave., Dolores, CO 81323

1Mortgage, Deed of Trust, Judgment, or other Lien Instrument.

2Sometimes called “Trust Indenture”.

3Sometimes called “Mortgaged Property”, “Trust Property”, or “Property”.

4Sometimes called “Mortgagee”, “Beneficiary”, “Judgment Creditor”, or “Creditor”.

5Sometimes called “Mortgagors”, “Grantors”, “Judgment Debtors”, or “Debtors”.

Published July 24, 31, August 7, 14 and 21, 2008 in The Pagosa Springs SUN.

_______________________

District Court, County of ARCHULETA

State of Colorado

Court Address: P.O. Box 148

449 San Juan Street

Pagosa Springs, CO 81147

Plaintiff(s):

Ptarmigan Property Owners Association, Inc.

v.

Defendant(s):

(1) Lawrence J. Winburn

(2) Unknowns: All Unknown Spouses Of Any Party

Hereto, And All Other Persons Living Or Dead

Whose Names Are Unknown, Who Claim Any

Interest in The Subject Real Estate

Philip M. Kleinsmith

Kleinsmith & Associates, P.C.

6035 Erin Park Drive, Suite 203

Colorado Springs, CO 80918

Phone: (719) 593-1970

Fax: (719) 593-2193

Email: klein@frii.com

Bar #: 1063

Case Number 08CV58

Div.______

NOTICES OF:

(1) LEVY AND RECORDING;

(2) RIGHT TO CLAIM EXEMPTION;

(3) RIGHT TO CURE AND/OR REDEEM;

(4) ELECTION OF SALE;

(5) SALE; AND

(6) GOVERNMENTAL CLAIMS YOU ARE NOTIFIED THAT:

All words and phrases which have the first letters thereof capitalized are defined on the attached Identifying Data of Legal Documents Upon Which foreclosure Is Based. The undersigned attorney certifies that to the best of his knowledge, the Judgment Debtor(s) and Current Owner(s) names and addresses are correct.

This proceeding for a Sheriff’s Sale (See Sheriff’s Identifying No. on attached Identifying Data, etc.) has been commenced in the office of the Sheriff of this County to foreclose the lien of the Mortgage, Deed of Trust and/or Judgment.

1. LEVY AND RECORDING: Judgment has been entered and a Writ of Execution has been issued by the above Court to the undersigned Sheriff to levy upon the Real Estate to be Sold, which is owed or was formerly owned by the Judgment Debtor(s), and to which the lien of the Lien Documents attached. Pursuant thereto, the undersigned Sheriff has levied upon or will levy upon the Real Estate to be Sold by recording these Notices in the appropriate real estate records.

2. RIGHT TO CLAIM EXEMPTION AND/OR ENJOIN: Within ten (10) days of the date of service hereof of the Judgment Debtor(s) and Current Owner(s), any one or more of them has a right to file with the Clerk of the above Court a written claim of exemption in the above case, which he, she or it may have by the laws of this State. At any time before this sale, Judgment Debtor(s), Current Owner(s), and other Interested Parties may have a right to enjoin this sale, if permitted by law. Failure to pursue these rights may be deemed a waiver thereof. The filing of a frivolous, groundless or vexatious lawsuit may result in attorney’s fees being assessed against you.

3. CURE AND/OR REDEMPTION RIGHTS: Pursuant to the laws of this State, you may have an interest in the Real Estate to be sold or have certain rights or suffer certain liabilities as a result of this Sheriff’s sale. You may have the right to cure a default under the judgment, or you may have a right to redeem the Real Estate to be Sold. A copy of said statutes, as such statutes are presently constituted, is attached to the copies hereof which are recorded, mailed and served.

The lien of the Lien Documents may not be a first lien.

A Notice of Intent to Cure filed pursuant to CRS 38-38-104 shall be filed with the Sheriff at least 15 calendar days prior to the first scheduled sale date or any date to which the sale is continued.

A Notice of Intent to Redeem filed pursuant to Section 38-38-302 shall be filed with the Sheriff no later than 8 business days after the sale.

4. ELECTION TO SELL: The Holder of the Judgment intends to have the Real Estate to be Sold by the undersigned Sheriff to partially or fully pay the lien of the Lien Documents. The effect of said sale will be to deprive all persons who claim an interest in the Real Estate of any right thereto, except as provided by law.

5. SALE: The Real Estate to be Sold, will be sold at public auction without warranties or guarantees at the following date, time and place:

Date of Sale: October 22, 2008

Place of Sale: Archuleta County

Sheriff’s Office, 449 San Juan Street, Pagosa Springs, CO

Time of Sale: 10:00 a.m.

Sale No. 2008-21

6. GOVERNMENTAL CLAIMS: To the copies of these Notices which are recorded, mailed, and served, there are attached copies of the written recorded claim of any governmental agency against the Real Estate and the independent notices which the law requires to be mailed to any such governmental agency to terminate their rights to the Real Estate.

Kleinsmith & Associates, P.C.

Attorney for Holder of Judgment

Colorado Attorney Registration No. 1063

6035 Erin Park Dr., Ste. 203

Colorado Springs, CO 80918

1-800-842-8417 or (719) 593-1970

By /s/ Philip M. Kleinsmith

Dated: July 14, 2008.

Sheriff of the Above County

/s/ Peter L. Gonzales

Address: 449 San Juan Street

Pagosa Springs, CO 81147

Identifying Data of Legal Documents1 Upon Which Foreclosure is Based

Type of Sale (Trustee, Sheriff, Special Master) and That Person’s Identifying No., (if applicable: Sheriff’s Sale - 2008-21

Type of Documents Being Foreclosed (Mortgage, Deed of Trust2, Judgment or Other Lien Instrument): Judgment

Default(s) Causing Foreclosure: Failure to Pay Judgment

Projected Amounts Owed As of Foreclosure Sale Date: Principal: $3,980.00, Interest: $759.50, Costs

(estimated): $2,500.00, Attorneys Fees (estimated): $875.00, Total (estimated): $8,114.50

Real Estate3 to be Sold: Common Description: Unit Week Number 04, Unit Number 7203, Building Number 2, Ptarmigan Townhouses Phase I, Archuleta County, Colorado.

Assessor’s Tax Parcel No.: Unknown

Legal Description: Unit Week Number 04, Unit Number 7203, Building Number 2, in Ptarmigan Townhouses Phase I, as recorded under Reception No. 153256, subject to Declaration of Individual and/or Interval Ownership for Ptarmigan Townhouses recorded under Reception No. 153557, and amendments and supplements thereto, in the Office of the County Clerk and Recorded in and for Archuleta County, Colorado.

Lien Documents: That is the Identifying Data of Legal Documents1 Being Foreclosed Per Real Estate Records of County Stated in Legal Description:

Mortgage or Deed of Trust: Dated: N/A

Judgment: Dated: 6/4/2008 Case No.: 2008CV58 Court: Archuleta County District Court

Transcript of Judgment: Dated: N/A

Writ of Execution: Dated: 6/20/2008

Other Lien Instrument: Dated: N/A

Recording Date: N/A

Recording Data: N/A

Original Principal Amount: $3,980.00

Original Trustee: N/A

Original Holder of Lien Documents: Name: Ptarmigan Property Owners Assoc., Inc. Address: c/o Foreclosure Management Company, 10975 El Monte, Suite 220, Overland Park, KS 66211

Present Holder4 of Lien Documents: Name: Ptarmigan Property Owners Assoc., Inc Address: c/o Foreclosure Management Company, 10975 El Monte, Suite 220, Overland Park, KS 66211

Original Liable Parties5 on Lien Documents: Name(s): Lawrence J. Winburn Address: 1234 S. Fenway, Casper, WY 82601

Judgment Debtor(s): Name(s): N/A - In Rem Only Address: N/A

Current Owner(s) of Real Estate: Name(s): Lawrence J. Winburn Address: 1234 S. Fenway, Capser, WY 82601

1Mortgage, Deed of Trust, Judgment, or other Lien Instrument.

2Sometimes called “Trust Indenture”.

3Sometimes called “Mortgaged Property”, “Trust Property”, or “Property”.

4Sometimes called “Mortgagee”, “Beneficiary”, “Judgment Creditor”, or “Creditor”.

5Sometimes called “Mortgagors”, “Grantors”, “Judgment Debtors”, or “Debtors”.

Published July 24, 31, August 7, 14 and 21, 2008 in The Pagosa Springs SUN.

_______________________

District Court, County of ARCHULETA

State of Colorado

Court Address: P.O. Box 148

449 San Juan Street

Pagosa Springs, CO 81147

Plaintiff(s):

Village Pointe Property Owners Association, Inc.

v.

Defendant(s):

(1) German Zuniga

(2) Sara R. Zuniga

(3) Unknowns: All Unknown Spouses Of Any Party

Hereto, And All Other Persons Living Or Dead

Whose Names Are Unknown, Who Claim Any

Interest in The Subject Real Estate

Philip M. Kleinsmith

Kleinsmith & Associates, P.C.

6035 Erin Park Drive, Suite 203

Colorado Springs, CO 80918

Phone: (719) 593-1970

Fax: (719) 593-2193

Email: klein@frii.com

Bar #: 1063

Case Number 08CV69

Div.______

NOTICES OF:

(1) LEVY AND RECORDING;

(2) RIGHT TO CLAIM EXEMPTION;

(3) RIGHT TO CURE AND/OR REDEEM;

(4) ELECTION OF SALE;

(5) SALE; AND

(6) GOVERNMENTAL CLAIMS YOU ARE NOTIFIED THAT:

All words and phrases which have the first letters thereof capitalized are defined on the attached Identifying Data of Legal Documents Upon Which foreclosure Is Based. The undersigned attorney certifies that to the best of his knowledge, the Judgment Debtor(s) and Current Owner(s) names and addresses are correct.

This proceeding for a Sheriff’s Sale (See Sheriff’s Identifying No. on attached Identifying Data, etc.) has been commenced in the office of the Sheriff of this County to foreclose the lien of the Mortgage, Deed of Trust and/or Judgment.

1. LEVY AND RECORDING: Judgment has been entered and a Writ of Execution has been issued by the above Court to the undersigned Sheriff to levy upon the Real Estate to be Sold, which is owed or was formerly owned by the Judgment Debtor(s), and to which the lien of the Lien Documents attached. Pursuant thereto, the undersigned Sheriff has levied upon or will levy upon the Real Estate to be Sold by recording these Notices in the appropriate real estate records.

2. RIGHT TO CLAIM EXEMPTION AND/OR ENJOIN: Within ten (10) days of the date of service hereof of the Judgment Debtor(s) and Current Owner(s), any one or more of them has a right to file with the Clerk of the above Court a written claim of exemption in the above case, which he, she or it may have by the laws of this State. At any time before this sale, Judgment Debtor(s), Current Owner(s), and other Interested Parties may have a right to enjoin this sale, if permitted by law. Failure to pursue these rights may be deemed a waiver thereof. The filing of a frivolous, groundless or vexatious lawsuit may result in attorney’s fees being assessed against you.

3. CURE AND/OR REDEMPTION RIGHTS: Pursuant to the laws of this State, you may have an interest in the Real Estate to be sold or have certain rights or suffer certain liabilities as a result of this Sheriff’s sale. You may have the right to cure a default under the judgment, or you may have a right to redeem the Real Estate to be Sold. A copy of said statutes, as such statutes are presently constituted, is attached to the copies hereof which are recorded, mailed and served.

The lien of the Lien Documents may not be a first lien.

A Notice of Intent to Cure filed pursuant to CRS 38-38-104 shall be filed with the Sheriff at least 15 calendar days prior to the first scheduled sale date or any date to which the sale is continued.

A Notice of Intent to Redeem filed pursuant to Section 38-38-302 shall be filed with the Sheriff no later than 8 business days after the sale.

4. ELECTION TO SELL: The Holder of the Judgment intends to have the Real Estate to be Sold by the undersigned Sheriff to partially or fully pay the lien of the Lien Documents. The effect of said sale will be to deprive all persons who claim an interest in the Real Estate of any right thereto, except as provided by law.

5. SALE: The Real Estate to be Sold, will be sold at public auction without warranties or guarantees at the following date, time and place:

Date of Sale: October 22, 2008

Place of Sale: Archuleta County

Sheriff’s Office, 449 San Juan Street, Pagosa Springs, CO

Time of Sale: 10:00 a.m. Sale No. 2008-24

6. GOVERNMENTAL CLAIMS: To the copies of these Notices which are recorded, mailed, and served, there are attached copies of the written recorded claim of any governmental agency against the Real Estate and the independent notices which the law requires to be mailed to any such governmental agency to terminate their rights to the Real Estate.

Kleinsmith & Associates, P.C.

Attorney for Holder of Judgment

Colorado Attorney Registration No. 1063

6035 Erin Park Dr., Ste. 203

Colorado Springs, CO 80918

1-800-842-8417 or (719) 593-1970

By /s/ Philip M. Kleinsmith

Dated: July 14, 2008.

Sheriff of the Above County

/s/ Peter L. Gonzales

Address: 449 San Juan Street

Pagosa Springs, CO 81147

Identifying Data of Legal Documents1 Upon Which Foreclosure is Based

Type of Sale (Trustee, Sheriff, Special Master) and That Person’s Identifying No., (if applicable: Sheriff’s Sale - 2008-24

Type of Documents Being Foreclosed (Mortgage, Deed of Trust2, Judgment or Other Lien Instrument):

Judgment

Default(s) Causing Foreclosure: Failure to Pay Judgment

Projected Amounts Owed As of Foreclosure Sale Date: Principal: $2,911.00, Interest: $120.96, Costs (estimated): $2,500.00, Attorneys Fees (estimated): $875.00, Total (estimated): $6,406.96

Real Estate3 to be Sold: Common Description: Unit Week Number 19, Condominium Unit Number 7522, Building Number 5, in Phase III of Village Pointe Condominiums, Archuleta County, Colorado.

Assessor’s Tax Parcel No.: Unknown

Legal Description: Unit Week Number 19, Condominium Unit Number 7522, Building Number 5, in Phase III of Village Pointe Condominiums, according to and as located on the recorded map recorded under Reception No. 176324 and the Declaration of Condominium and Interval Ownership of Village Pointe Condominiums recorded under Reception No. 160495, and amendments and supplements thereto, in the Office of the County Clerk, Archuleta County, Colorado.

Lien Documents: That is the Identifying Data of Legal Documents1 Being Foreclosed Per Real Estate Records of County Stated in Legal Description:

Mortgage or Deed of Trust: Dated: N/A

Judgment: Dated: 5/19/2008 Case No.: 2008CV69 Court: Archuleta County District Court

Transcript of Judgment: Dated: N/A

Writ of Execution: Dated: 6/23/2008

Other Lien Instrument: Dated: N/A

Recording Date: N/A

Recording Data: N/A

Original Principal Amount: $2,911.00

Original Trustee: N/A

Original Holder4 of Lien Documents: Name: Village Pointe Property Owners Association, Inc. Address: c/o Foreclosure Management Company, 10975 El Monte, Suite 220, Overland Park, KS 66211

Present Holder of Lien Documents: Name: Village Pointe Property Owners Association, Inc. Address: c/o Foreclosure Management Company, 10975 El Monte, Suite 220, Overland Park, KS 66211

Original Liable Parties5 on Lien Documents: Name(s): German Zuniga and Sara Zuniga Address: 2313 Jarboe Street, Kansas City, MO 64108 and 10713 Cypress Avenue, Kansas City, MO 64137

Judgment Debtor(s): Name(s): N/A - In Rem Only Address: N/A

Current Owner(s) of Real Estate: Name(s): German Zuniga and Sara Zuniga Address: 2313 Jarboe Street, Kansas City, MO 64108 and 10713 Cypress Avenue, Kansas City, MO 64137

1Mortgage, Deed of Trust, Judgment, or other Lien Instrument.

2Sometimes called “Trust Indenture”.

3Sometimes called “Mortgaged Property”, “Trust Property”, or “Property”.

4Sometimes called “Mortgagee”, “Beneficiary”, “Judgment Creditor”, or “Creditor”.

5Sometimes called “Mortgagors”, “Grantors”, “Judgment Debtors”, or “Debtors”.

Published July 24, 31, August 7, 14 and 21, 2008 in The Pagosa Springs SUN.

_______________________

COMBINED NOTICE OF SALE AND RIGHT TO CURE OR REDEEM

To Whom it may concern: This Notice is given with regard to the following described Deed of Trust:

Public Trustee’s Foreclosure Sale No. 58-2008 was commenced on 5-22-08 in the office of the undersigned Public Trustee relating to the Deed of Trust described below:

Mark A. Arnold and Kimberly K. Arnold Original Grantor(s)

Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as nominee for Chapel Funding, LLC Original Beneficiary

HSBC Bank USA, N.A., as Trustee on behalf of ACE Securities Corp. Home Equity Loan Trust and for the registered holders of ACE Securities Corp. Home Equity Loan Trust 2007-HE1 Asset Backed Pass-Through Certificates Current Holder of Evidence of Debt

August 25, 2006 Date of Deed of Trust

Archuleta County of Recording

August 30, 2006 Recording Date of Deed of Trust:

At Reception No. 20608326 Recording Information Receipt No. and/or Book No. and Page No.

$172,800.00 Original Principal Balance

$172,446.50 Outstanding Principal Balance

Pursuant to C.R.S. § 38-38-101(4)(i), you are hereby notified that the covenants of the Deed of Trust have been violated as follows: Failure to pay principal and interest when due together with all other payments provided for in the Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust and other violations thereof.

THE LIEN FORECLOSED MAY NOT BE A FIRST LIEN.

THE PROPERTY DESCRIBED HEREIN IS ALL OF THE PROPERTY CURRENTLY ENCUMBERED BY THE LIEN OF THE DEED OF TRUST.

UNIT 1, BUILDING ONE, NORTH COVE CONDOMINIUMS, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF FILED FOR RECORD AUGUST 22, 2000 AS RECEPTION NO. 20008136.

WHICH HAS THE ADDRESS OF 78 Aspenglow Boulevard #1 Pagosa Springs, CO 81147

NOTICE OF SALE

The current Holder of the Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust described herein, has filed written election and demand for sale as provided by law and in said Deed of Trust.

THEREFORE, Notice Is Herby Given that I will at public action at 10:00 a.m. on September 11, 2008, at at the front door of the Archuleta County Public Trustee’s Office, 449 San Juan Street, P O Box 790, Pagosa Springs, Colorado, sell to the highest and best bidder for cash, the said real property and all interest of the said Grantor(s), Grantor(s)’ heirs and assigns therein, for the purpose of paying the indebtedness provided in said Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust, plus attorney’s fees, the expenses of sale, and other items allowed by law, and will deliver to the purchaser a Certificate of Purchase, all as provided by law.

NOTICE OF RIGHTS

YOU MAY HAVE AN INTEREST IN THE REAL PROPERTY BEING FORECLOSED, OR HAVE CERTAIN RIGHTS OR SUFFER CERTAIN LIABILITIES PURSUANT TO COLORADO STATUTES AS A RESULT OF SAID FORECLOSURE. YOU MAY HAVE THE RIGHT TO REDEEM SAID REAL PROPERTY OR YOU MAY HAVE THE RIGHT TO CURE A DEFAULT UNDER THE DEED OF TRUST BEING FORECLOSED. A COPY OF SAID STATUTES, AS SUCH STATUTES ARE PRESENTLY CONSTITUTED, WHICH MAY AFFECT YOUR RIGHTS, IS ATTACHED TO THIS NOTICE. HOWEVER, YOUR RIGHTS MAY BE DETERMINED BY PREVIOUS STATUTES.

A NOTICE OF INTENT TO CURE FILED PURSUANT TO C.R.S. 38-38-104 SHALL BE FILED WITH THE PUBLIC TRUSTEE AT LEAST FIFTEEN (15) CALENDAR DAYS PRIOR TO THE FIRST SCHEDULED SALE DATE OR ANY DATE TO WHICH THE SALE IS CONTINUED.

A NOTICE OF INTENT TO REDEEM FILED PURSUANT TO C.R.S. 38-38-302 SHALL BE FILED WITH THE PUBLIC TRUSTEE NO LATER THAN EIGHT (8) BUSINESS DAYS AFTER THE SALE.

DATE: 5-22-08

Public Trustee of Archuleta County, State of Colorado

/s/ Lois Baker by Vicky Rudock, Deputy

By: Lois Baker, Public Trustee

The name, address and telephone number of the attorneys representing the legal holder of the indebtedness is:

David A. Shore. Reg. No. 19973

Scott D. Toebben, Reg. No. 19011

Martin H. Shore, Reg. No. 1800

Hellerstein and Shore, P.C., 5347 S. Valentia Way, Suite 100, Greenwood Village, CO 80111, (303) 573-1080

THE ATTORNEY ABOVE IS ACTING AS A DEBT COLLECTOR AND IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION PROVIDED MAY BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE.

Published July 17, 24, 31, August 7 and 14, 2008 in The Pagosa Springs SUN.

_______________________

COMBINED NOTICE ARCHULETA COUNTY PUBLIC TRUSTEE

SALE NO. 55-2008

This Notice concerns the Deed of Trust (“Trust Deed”) described as follows:

Grantor: Bonnie M Phillips

Original Beneficiary: Centennial Savings Bank, FSB

Current Owner of the Evidence of Debt: Vectra Bank

Date of Deed of Trust: February 16, 1996

Recording Date of Deed of Trust: February 16, 1996

Original Principal Amount of Evidence of Debt: $56,500.00

Outstanding Principal Amount of Evidence of Debt as of the date hereof: $47,027.88

County of Recording: Archuleta

Book and Page No. or Reception No. of Recorded Deed of Trust: as Reception No. 1996001071

Legal Description of Real Property: LOT 467 IN LAKE FOREST ESTATES, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF FILED FOR RECORD JUNE 4, 1973 AS RECEPTION NO. 77869. Also known as: 11 Dragoon Court, Pagosa Springs, CO 81147, Now Known As: 1145 Lake Forest Circle, Pagosa Springs, CO 81147

THE PROPERTY DESCRIBED HEREIN IS ALL OF THE PROPERTY CURRENTLY ENCUMBERED BY THE LIEN OF THE DEED OF TRUST.

THE LIEN OF THE DEED OF TRUST TO BE FORECLOSED MAY NOT BE A FIRST LIEN.

YOU ARE NOTIFIED AS FOLLOWS:

The Holder of the debt secured by the Deed of Trust declares a violation of the covenants of said Deed of Trust for reasons including, but not limited to, the failure to make payments as provided for in the Deed of Trust and Negotiable Instrument.

The Holder of the Debt secured by the Deed of Trust has filed a written Notice of Election and Demand for sale with the undersigned Public Trustee under the terms of the Deed of Trust.

A notice of Intent to Cure filed pursuant to Colorado Revised Statutes 38-38-104 shall be filed with the undersigned at least 15 calendar days prior to the first schedule sale date or any date to which the sale is continued.

A notice of Intent to Redeem pursuant to Colorado Revised Statutes 38-38-302 shall be filed with the undersigned no later than 8 business days after the sale.

The name, address and telephone number of each attorney (if any) representing the Holder of the Debt is as follows:

Robert J. Aronowitz, Esq.Reg. No. 5673

Joel T. Mecklenburg, Esq. Reg. No. 36291

Stacey L. Aronowitz, Esq. Reg. No. 36290

Joan Olson, Esq. Reg. No. 28078

Marcy L. McDermott, Esq. Reg. No. 38030

Aronowitz & Ford, LLP

1199 Bannock Street

Denver, Colorado 80204

(303) 813-1177

NOTICE OF SALE

The undersigned will on September 11, 2008, at 10:00 a.m., at Archuleta County Courthouse, 449 San Juan St., Pagosa Springs, CO 81147, sell the Property at public auction to the highest bidder who has submitted bid funds to the undersigned as specified by C.R.S. 38-38-1-6(7) to pay the Debt and certain other sums, all as provided by applicable law and the Deed of Trust.

THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED MAY BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE.

DATED: May 14, 2008

/s/ Lois Baker

Public Trustee of Archuleta County, Colorado

Lois Baker

Public Trustee of Archuleta County

By: /s/ Vicky Rudock

Deputy Public Trustee

Published July 17, 24, 31, August 7 and 14, 2008 in The Pagosa Springs SUN.

_______________________

COMBINED NOTICE OF SALE AND NOTICE OF RIGHTS TO CURE OR REDEEM

Public Trustee No. 57-2008

To Whom It May Concern: This Notice is given with regard to the following described Deed of Trust:

On 05-22-08, the undersigned Public Trustee caused the Notice of Election and Demand relating to the Deed of Trust described below to be recorded in the County of Archuleta records.

Original Grantor ANGELA B BAUER AND ANDREAS BAUER

Original Beneficiary WASHINGTON MUTUAL BANK, FA

Current Beneficiary LASALLE BANK NA AS TRUSTEE FOR WAMU MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES SERIES 2007-HY06 TRUST

Date of Deed of Trust 3/29/2007

Recording Date of Deed of Trust 4/3/2007

Recorded in Archuleta County Reception No. 20702776

Original Principal Amount $590,000.00

Outstanding Balance $590,000.00

Pursuant to C.R.S. §38-38-101 (4)(i), you are hereby notified that the covenants of the deed of trust have been violated as follows;

Failure to pay monthly installments due Note Holder.

THE LIEN FORECLOSED MAY NOT BE A FIRST LIEN.

THE PROPERTY DESCRIBED HEREIN IS ALL OF THE PROPERTY ENCUMBERED BY THE LIEN OF THE DEED OF TRUST.

LOT 11, OAK HILL RANCHES, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF FILED FOR RECORD SEPTEMBER 13, 2000 AS RECEPTION NO. 20008801.

which has the address of: 1562 Ranchland Dr Pagosa Springs, CO 81147

NOTICE OF SALE

The current owner of the Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust described herein, has filed written election and demand for sale as provided by law and in said Deed of Trust.

THEREFORE, Notice Is Herby Given that I will, at 10:00 a.m. in the forenoon of September 11, 2008, At the Archuleta County Public Trustee’s Office, 449 San Juan Street, Pagosa Springs, Colorado, sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder for cash, the said real property and all interest of said Grantor(s), Grantor(s)’ heirs and assigns therein, for the purpose of paying the indebtedness provided in said Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust, plus attorneys’ fees, the expenses of sale and other items allowed by law, and will deliver to the purchaser a Certificate of Purchase, all as provided by law.

NOTICE OF RIGHTS

YOU MAY HAVE AN INTEREST IN THE REAL PROPERTY BEING FORECLOSED, OR HAVE CERTAIN RIGHTS OR SUFFER CERTAIN LIABILITIES PURSUANT TO COLORADO STATUTES AS A RESULT OF SAID FORECLOSURE. YOU MAY HAVE THE RIGHT TO REDEEM SAID REAL PROPERTY OR YOU MAY HAVE THE RIGHT TO CURE A DEFAULT UNDER THE DEED OF TRUST BEING FORECLOSED. A COPY OF SAID STATUES, AS SUCH STATUTES ARE PRESENTLY CONSTITUTED, WHICH MAY AFFECT YOUR RIGHTS, IS ATTACHED TO ALL MAILED COPIES OF THIS NOTICE. HOWEVER, YOUR RIGHTS MAY BE DETERMINED BY PREVIOUS STATUTES.

• A NOTICE OF INTENT TO CURE FILED PURSUANT TO C.R.S. 38-38-104 SHALL BE FILED WITH THE PUBLIC TRUSTEE AT LEAST FIFTEEN (15) CALENDAR DAYS PRIOR TO THE FIRST SCHEDULED SALE DATE OR ANY DATE TO WHICH THE SALE IS CONTINUED.

• A NOTICE OF INTENT TO REDEEM FILED PURSUANT TO C.R.S. 38-38-302 SHALL BE FILED WITH THE PUBLIC TRUSTEE NO LATER THAN EIGHT (8) BUSINESS DAYS FOLLOWING THE SALE.

Dated: 5-22-08

LOIS BAKER

Archuleta COUNTY PUBLIC TRUSTEE

By: /s/ Vicky Rudock, Deputy

Attorney:

Law Office of Michael P. Medved, P.C. Attorney Registration No. 14669

355 Union Blvd., Suite 302, Lakewood, CO 80228

Phone: (303) 274-0155 Fax: (303) 274-0159

Attorney file #915-09392

Published July 17, 24, 31, August 7 and 14, 2008 in The Pagosa Springs SUN.

_______________________

District Court, Archuleta County, State of Colorado

Court Address: PO Box 148, 449 San Juan St.

Pagosa Springs, CO 81147

EAGLE’S LOFT PROPERTY OWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC.

Plaintiffs,

vs.

YSLETA L. LEISSNER, THE ESTATE YSLETA L. LEISSNER, THE PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE OF THE ESTATE OF YSLETA LEISSNER, BRIAN JEFFREY BRYANT AND KIRBY BRYANT KANAREK AS THE HEIRS AND DEVISEES OF THE ESTATE OF YSLETA L. LEISSNER and All unknown Persons Who Claim Any Interest in the Subject Matter of this Action.

Defendant.

Case Number: 08 CV 114

Attorney for Plaintiffs:

Larry W. Holthus

PO Box 1737

Pagosa Springs, CO 81147

Phone Number: (970) 264-4196

FAX Number: (970) 264-4197

Atty. Reg. #: 10535

SUMMONS BY PUBLICATION

THE PEOPLE OF THE STATE OF COLORADO TO THE ABOVE NAMED DEFENDANTS:

You are hereby summoned and required to appear and defend against the claims of the Complaint filed with the Court in this action, by filing with the Clerk of this Court, an Answer or other response. You are required to file your Answer or other response within thirty (30) days after the date of the last publication. A copy of the Complaint may be obtained from the Clerk of the Court.

If you fail to file your Answer or other response to the Complaint in writing within thirty (30) days after the date of the last publication, judgment by default may be rendered against you by the Court for the relief demanded in the Complaint without further notice.

This is an action to quiet title to:

Unit Number 21 Building Number 21, Unit Week Number 52, in ‘EAGLE’S LOFT - Phase Three, as Reception No. 130203 and in accordance with and as limited and defined by the Declaration of Individual and/or Interval Ownership, recorded under Reception Number 117700 in Book 200 at Page 834 et seq and amendments and supplements thereto in the Office of the County Clerk and Recorder in and for Archuleta County, Colorado.

Dated this 10th day of July, 2008.

/s/ Larry W. Holthus

Larry W. Holthus

Published July 17, 24, 31, August 7 and 14, 2008 in The Pagosa Springs SUN.

_______________________

DISTRICT COURT, ARCHULETA COUNTY, COLORADO

Court Address:

449 San Juan Street

Pagosa Springs, CO 81147

(970) 264-5932

RTM HOLDINGS, LLC AND CHARLES KALISH,

Plaintiffs

v.

STANCIE L. JONES, DOROTHY-NOLL JONES, THE ESTATE OF DOROTHY-NOLL JONES AND ANY AND ALL HEIRS AND DEVISEES OF DOROTHY-NOLL JONES, PAGOSA LAKES PROPERTY OWNERS ASSOCIATION, PAGOSA AREA WATER AND SANITATION DISTRICT, WYNDHAM VACATION RESORTS, INC., formerly known as FAIRFIELD RESORTS, INC. and all unknown persons who claim any interest in the subject matter of this action,

Defendants.

Case Number: 08 CV 21

Attorney for Plaintiff:

Lisa D. Toy

8 Heather Place

Pagosa Springs, CO 81147

Phone Number: (970) 731-8280

FAX Number: (970) 731-8281

Atty. Reg. #: 33886

SUMMONS BY PUBLICATION

THE PEOPLE OF THE STATE OF COLORADO TO THE DEFENDANTS NAMED ABOVE:

You are hereby summoned and required to file with the clerk of this court an answer or other response to the claims of the complaint filed with the Court in this action within thirty (30) days after the service of this summons upon you. Service of this summons shall be complete on the day of the last publication. A copy of the complaint may be obtained from the clerk of the court.

If you fail to file your answer or other response to the complaint in writing within the applicable time period, judgment by default may be entered against you by the Court for the relief demanded in the complaint, without any further notice to you.

This is an action to quiet the title to:

Lot 281, Lake Forest Estates, according to the plat thereof filed June 4, 1973, as Reception No. 77869, in the office of the Clerk and Recorder, Archuleta County, Colorado.

DATED this 7th day of July, 2008.

/s/ Lisa D. Toy

Lisa D. Toy, #33886

8 Heather Place

Pagosa Springs, CO 81147

(970) 731-8280

Published July 17, 24, 31, August 7 and 14, 2008 in The Pagosa Springs SUN.

_______________________

Harman Museum seeks community involvement

FOCUS

Get the lead out!

Local company works for the health of fish and waterfowl everywhere

The nice thing about being John Unger is that the research and development for the production of his company’s non-toxic fishing products “requires hours of intense and dedicated year-round fishing,” as his company brochure reads.

And what’s even better is that Unger can fish with an easy conscience — happy in the knowledge that his sport and profession have a minimal environmental impact on the rivers and streams he fishes.

John and Lori Unger have lived in Pagosa Springs for nine years. And that’s around the same amount of time they have been growing their lead-free fishing tackle products company from their home, and a small factory and headquarters right here in Archuleta County.

Most standard fishing weights, sinkers and jigs used by fishermen in the United States today contain lead, which according to Field and Stream magazine (May 2008) is a poisonous, naturally occurring metal that does not dissolve readily in water.

“Lead affects different animal species — from invertebrates, to waterfowl, to fish, to humans — differently … A relatively small amount of lead, for example can kill an adult loon within a matter of days,” the article reports. Lead has also been shown to kill off scavenging birds such as bald eagles and condors when they eat smaller birds who have ingested lead weights, wrote Kirk Deeter, the author of the article. Research suggests that lead may also be a contributing factor in the various causes of death in other aquatic species.

At least five states in the U.S. have already passed various degrees of legislation banning lead fishing implements. And the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has banned lead sinkers in two national wildlife refuges and Yellowstone National Park, and more such restrictions are currently being discussed. In the United Kingdom lead weights are banned nationwide. Many people believe that this is just the start of a trend towards much more widespread bans on fishing with lead in America. Pagosa’s own John Unger is quoted in the aforementioned Field and Stream article as saying: “…we think lead bans will continue to spread across the country. And the bottom line is that if you know that tin, for example, is not a threat to the environment, and you know you can weight your fishing rig as effectively by using non-toxic metals as you can with lead, it just makes plain sense to do the right thing.”

Doing the right thing, for the Ungers, extends beyond simply selling their line of about 25 products for fly, bass, bait and jighead fishing made from tin, bismuth, copper, indium, brass and other non-toxic, inert metals. The goal of BossTin (the company takes its name from a British phrase that’s slang for “way cool,” or “awesome”) is not simply to vend their merchandise, but to truly revolutionize fishing worldwide. And, together with their United Kingdom partner company, they’re managing to have the kind of global influence the Ungers dreamed of just eight years ago. For example, in addition to the BossTin merchandise line, the Unger’s run a program called “Unleaded Anglers,” whereby fishermen can bring their old lead weights to fishing trade shows and exchange it for BossTin non-toxic products. BossTin then disposes of the lead products properly through the EPA. In case you need extra incentive to exchange your old gear, let it be said that participants in the Unleaded Angler program also get a button to wear that reads “I’m an unleaded angler.” How’s that for a deal?

Lead-free fishing enthusiasts can now find the BossTin line of products in a number of locations, including the local establishments Let it Fly, Ski and Bow Rack and Wolf Creek Anglers. Paul Nogueira, a store clerk and fishing guide with Wolf Creek Anglers, assured The SUN that the BossTin products are great not only for their environmental aspect, but because they work really well, too. Just recently, “the big boys,” as the Ungers call them, have come on board too — Cabela’s and Bass Pro, two major outfitters of fishing gear — are both on track to carry BossTin non-toxic products. BossTin has arrived, so to speak, in the world of fishing merchandise.

But making major sales is not, in fact, the number-one priority for this Pagosa couple and their local partners, who include the Lindblad Group, Werner Kuhne and his company MAS, and Karl and Joanne Irons. A more pressing aim for the founders of BossTin is their quest to “get the lead out.” And with that as their goal, John and Lori Unger have realized that young people are the ultimate hook for imparting a lasting change in the attitudes of the fishing community and in the health of the ecosystems which that community needs.

“One of our main missions in this business is educating the public,” said Lori. “We knew it was going to be a long hard battle — changing the mind set of people is a hard, hard thing to do.” So the couple started working with the younger generation of outdoorspeople. “We sponsor fishing derbies with Boy Scouts of America, and we sponsor our local Hooked on Fishing, Not on Drugs campaign. We also sponsor about 20,000 kids in fishing programs with the Colorado Division of Wildlife.” The idea is to change the mindset of young people, and show them that lead has no place in our rivers and streams, said the Ungers.

The actions of 10-year old local fishermen Mason Vrazel are a good sign that the Unger’s mission is working. Vrazel participated in a Hooked on Fishing program in Pagosa and learned about the toxins in lead from John and Lori that day. Soon after, Vrazel made a visit to a local store to purchase his first fly rod. The store clerk offered to sell Vrazel the weights and hooks he would need to get started as well, and Mason recalls asking for non-toxic options. Luckily the shop carries the BossTin line, and so Vrazel was able to leave that day fully equipped for lead-free fishing. When asked by The SUN why he made a point of purchasing unleaded gear, Vrazel said: “Well, they don’t hurt the fish, and that is that.”


Dylan Weber Burkesmith

Our son, Dylan, left us suddenly but peacefully in the early hours of Sunday, July 20, 2008. Dylan entered our lives on Oct. 10, 1991, in Aspen, Colo. He was a brilliant and passionate force in our lives for 16 years.

It is daily sorrow and joy to realize what an uncommon presence we were blessed with for those 16 years.

A memorial in celebration of Dylan’s life was held on the lawn of 268 Hermosa Street Sunday, July 27. Dylan Weber Burkesmith was celebrated by his family — his younger brother, Connor; sister, Molly; his mother, Margaret; and father, Rudy Smith;  as well as the step-family with whom he lived throughout the school year in Pagosa — Carter, Jefferson, Jackson and Glenn Walsh. Dylan’s grandparents, John and Theresa Burke (who live in Massachusetts), and Dick and Joanne Smith (who live in Ohio).

Dylan was approaching his senior year at the Pagosa Springs High School.  Dylan was an early and high achiever in school, meeting honor roll or high honor roll since moving to Pagosa in 2001. His achievements arose in large part from the dedication, mutual respect and good humor of the fine teachers this small town manages to attract.  Dylan had aspirations for college, travel, filmmaking, and had interest in psychology (people and their ways both fascinated and frustrated him as he’d seek to understand them).

Dylan’s loves were skiing and snowboarding up on Wolf Creek Pass (or wherever he could find or make a hill or jump!). He also spent a lot of time skateboarding, listening to music, watching movies, and playing games on the computer. Yet, Dylan’s most obvious delight and fullest enjoyment came from being with his many friends, as he carved out as much time as he could to be with them.  Dylan’s friends took precedence over practicalities — even over money, which is a fine quality.  Dylan was a very generous and honest friend.

We know we cannot know the extent and depth of this loss.  We can only live moment to moment and be open to what arises in each of these moments.  And be open to what arises within us, as a memory appears — Dylan is a very memorable young man — or a thought, or a gasping of breath, or a heart palpitation, or a dream.

We trust that Dylan is riding out his soul’s journey and remain thankful that he chose us for what seems to be a very short journey in ‘our’ world.

As we continue to recognize and accept our sorrow, we would also like to remember the joy.  We welcome any and all memories, photos, sharings of any type, so that we continue to learn and have a fuller and deeper understanding of Dylan, who we sense will always remain a beautiful mystery.

We want to extend our most heartfelt appreciation and gratefulness to all who have shared time, thoughts, feelings, hugs, blessings, flowers, cards, food, money, grief and laughter. We are at once not surprised and in awe of our Pagosa community and our families (who all traveled many, many miles to be with us!) for the outpouring of love and care to all of us in this time of loss.

Trust that we will always keep you in our prayers, as well.


Lois Irene Adams Schultz Portenier

Lois was born to Ray Adams and Lena (Briddle) Adams March 30, 1919, in Cozad, Neb., and passed away August 9, 2008, in Pagosa Springs, Colo., at the age of 89.

Lois attended Cozad’s grade and junior high schools and was graduated from Cozad High School in 1937. She attended Kearney State Teacher’s College where she acquired a bachelor of arts degree with a special endorsement in library science. Following college she taught school in Nebraska at Chapman, Ogallala and Harvard. Lois also spent a summer with a study group touring Denmark and Norway and studied at the University of Oslo.

During World War II she had a permanent Civil Service rating and worked in Washington, D.C. in the OSS (Office of Strategic Service) and at the Harvard Air Base in Nebraska. In September of 1942 she married Harold J. Schultz, of Harvard, Neb. Harold also worked during the war with the government in Washington, DC and then returned with Lois to his family farm in Harvard to continue farming. Harold preceded her in death in 1971.

In 1973 she married Keith E. Portenier of Guide Rock, Neb., and they farmed in Guide Rock and Harvard, Neb,. Keith preceded her in death in 1998.

In 2002 Lois moved to Pagosa Springs, where her son, Douglas Schultz, and his wife live. She resided in Pagosa Springs until the time of her death.

Lois was a past Worthy Matron of the Eastern Star and a member of Delta Kappa Gamma, an honorary teachers’ sorority, and PEO Sisterhood.

Lois was a remarkable and lovely lady who will be sincerely missed by those who knew her and loved her.

She is survived by her son, Douglas L. Schultz and his wife, Katrina, of Pagosa Springs, Colo.; her sister, Leola Adams Long, of Dallas, Texas; two stepchildren, Connie Maas and her husband, Dan, of Fullerton, Neb., and Keith Portenier, Jr. and his wife, Sharon, of Harvard, Neb., and their families.

Funeral services will be held at the United Methodist Church in Pagosa Springs Aug. 16, 2008, at 10 a.m. Graveside burial services will be held at the Cozad Cemetery in Cozad, Neb. Monday, Aug. 18, 2008, at 2 p.m.

Flowers may be sent to either service or a donation made to the Archuleta County Senior Center or the charity of your choice.


John C. Bowe

Reverend John C. Bowe, C.R. died Tuesday, Aug. 12, at the Colorado State Veterans Nursing Center in Monte Vista, Colorado.

Father John, as he was known to those who knew and loved him, served for many years as pastor at Immaculate Heart of Mary Catholic Church in Pagosa Springs. He left his parish in Pagosa Springs in 2004 to take up residence in San Luis, Colo., where he continued work with his brothers in the Theatine Order.

He studied at Catholic University in Washington, D.C. for five years and while working as a social worker, he entered the seminary in 1964. He was ordained a priest in the Theatine Order (Clerics Regular) in 1968. He served as a school teacher and principal, and as a pastor before being assigned to Pagosa Springs.

He was appointed pastor of Immaculate Heart of Mary Parish in 1976. He continued as pastor until 1984 when he was called upon to serve as Provincial of the Theatines. He returned to IHM as pastor in 1991.

In addition to IHM, its four rural mission churches and their parishioners were also close to Father John’s heart. On alternating weekends for years, he traveled to St. Francis in Frances; to St. James the Apostle in Trujillo; St. John the Baptist in Pagosa Junction; and the Chromo Mission Station in Chromo to celebrate Mass.

A Mass of Christian Burial for Father John is scheduled at 11 a.m., Tuesday, Aug. 19, at the Sangre de Cristo Church in San Luis.

A Pagosa memorial service is being planned, with date and location to be announced.

Celebrations

Nicholas Toth

Camper Nicholas Toth V, son of Mr. and Mrs. Nicholas Toth IV, of Pagosa Springs, has completed all requirements as camper at Marine Military Academy (MMA) in Harlingen, Texas, and earns completion certification as administered by MMA President BGEN Stephen A. Cheney, USMC (Ret.); MMA Superintendent Col. R.G. Hill, USMC (Ret.); and MMA Commandant Sgt. Maj. Ford Kinsley, USMC (Ret.)

The Marine Military Academy, founded in 1965, is the only college preparatory school in the country based on the customs and traditions of the United States Marine Corps. This year, over 300 campers from 36 different states and three foreign countries enrolled in the four-week U.S. Marine Corps-style Leadership Camp. MMA is also an all-male college preparatory school for those in the eighth through 12th grades, with one year post-graduate study availability.


Juan Manuel Baxin-Quintana

Juan Baxin-Marcial and Rose Quintana are proud to announce the birth of their baby boy, Juan Manuel Baxin-Quintana. He was born Aug. 1, 2008, at 2:34 p.m., weighing 6 pounds, 6 ounces and was 18 1/2 inches long. His proud grandparents are Manuel Baxin-Santos and Elidia Marcial-Marcial of Veracruz, Mexico, Bruce Quintana and Clarence and Jeanie Riley of Pagosa Springs, Colo.


Jessica Chavez and David Saxon

Jessica Chavez and David Saxon were wed July 5, 2008, in Albuquerque, N.M. The couple now lives in Farmington, N.M.


Pierre Mion featured at Saturday’s Art in the Garden Festival

“He draws too much in class!” was a comment written on Pierre Mion’s fourth-grade report card.

Those of you who plan to attend the Art in the Garden Festival this Saturday, Aug.16, from 3 to 7 p.m. will have an opportunity to ask this local resident and professional artist to explain what this statement had to do with his future career as an artist/illustrator. Fortunately his architect father recognized a potential young artist rather than a disobedient child. After all, when Pierre was only 2 1/2 years old he drew a recognizable picture of a circus tent and a ferris wheel he had seen at a circus in nearby Philadelphia, Pa. From that point on his father provided him with much encouragement, quality art supplies and superb initial instruction.

We are fortunate to have Pierre here as a full-time resident, sharing his talents as a working artist, teacher and mentor. He and his wife Sandy moved here after traveling through the area on an extended motorcycle trip. He was a full-time working artist, and had no plans to become involved in the local Arts Council until he met Doris Greene, who twisted his arm “until it almost broke,” laughs Mion. She assured him he would not have to do anything — just come to the annual meeting to get a feel for the local art community.. He attended that meeting, soon became a board member and by then found he was totally immersed in the local art community. He has served as a Board member on numerous occasions, has judged art shows, has had numerous exhibits, has been an instructor in the community, and has performed many behind-the-scenes tasks. And, he says, “I’m really glad now that I did!” And so are we.

Pierre has had a diverse and highly satisfying career as an artist. He was a freelance artist for National Geographic for 38 years. He turned down offers to become a regular staff member because he wished to pursue other projects and areas of interest. Other clients he did illustrations for during his career include, but are4 by no means limited to, the U.S. Postal Service, NASA, the U.S. Treasury, the U.S. Armed Forces, CBS, Reynolds Aluminum, IBM, and National Park Service as well as Look, Life, Reader’s Digest, Popular Science, Air and Space, and the Saturday Evening Post Magazines. He was contacted by Norman Rockwell, (not the other way around!), to work with him on a presentation.

Pierre has illustrated events of global importance that have taken place from the depths of the ocean to the heights beyond Earth’s atmosphere, and countless places in between. He has worked directly with impressive personalities such as Isaac Asimov, Carl Sagan, Werner Von Braun, and Michael Collins and other astronauts. He worked with Jacques Cousteau, who wanted to put man under sea to work and not to just look at fish and their habitat. National Geographic had both the film and print rights, and Pierre played a key role in this project.

His interests are diverse, and as a result, so are his illustrations. He became an avid and accomplished horseback rider at the age of seven. His father had been a rider in the Italian Cavalry in World War I, and as an accomplished rider, passed this love of the equestrian world on to his son. From here Pierre graduated to motorized sports; first stock cars, then on to motorcycles and sports cars. During this time his interest and talent in illustrating continued to grow, and he went on to attend George Washington University’s Cocoran School of Art where he had the opportunity to work with and learn from other talented students and instructors. He says that many of the art students were “older guys” who were beginning their college pursuits after having served in World War II. Pierre says that the talent and determination of these students were both humbling and learning experiences for him. He feels fortunate to be among those from this talented group who have been able to successfully pursue the love of art as a career.

The inspiration for his art comes from what he sees in light and nature. He always has a camera with him, and he captures images wherever he goes. He can look at these images at a later date, then move, add or subtract elements to them to create his own interpretation of the scenes. Students in his classes have painted from many of his original illustrations, Works by his students can often be seen in local exhibits at the Arts Council Gallery in Town Park and at Ruby M. Sisson Library.

His work has been done primarily in “gouache” which is an opaque water-soluble medium with beautiful vibrant colors, but recently he has also done impressive work with acrylics and oils. When he bEgins a new work, he studies his original illustration(s) from an area, thinks about the light, color, and tone he wishes to portray, and begins. He does most of his initial sketches with magic markers.

Pierre will not be painting plein air at the festival, but he will, along with the other artists, have works for sale in the artists’ tent. He looks forward to having the opportunity to visit with all the guests. After he has cleared up the question about being a somewhat “independent” 9-year-old, you might ask him about “Violet and Dutch” who were the models for his version of the famous painting by Grant Woods, “American Gothic.”

This festival, benefiting the local Community Assistance Program, will be a delightful combination of art, musical performances, and gourmet appetizers, all in the beautiful mountain setting at Rito Blanco Nursery on County. Rd. 326 (Rito Blanco Road off U.S. 84.) County ROAD 326 is eight miles south of the U.S. 84 and 160 interchange, and signs with the Festival logo will direct you to the turnoff.

A limited number of Festival tickets, are still available for $30 (in advance only) at the Chamber of Commerce, Methodist Church office, Higher Grounds Coffee Co., Moonlight Books and the Plaid Pony. No tickets will be sold after 5 p.m. Friday, Aug. 15.

Pagosa keyboard artist to play for Art in the Garden Festival

Michael Joseph Thomas will be sharing his original keyboard style during the Art in the Garden festival at the Rito Blanco Nursery Aug. 16.

The festival is being held to benefit the Community Assistance Fund and is being hosted by a group of women from Community United Methodist Church.

Thomas grew up playing the piano and is mainly self-taught. Since then he has perfected his art, mainly on the synthesizer and now plays original pieces, which he continues to write. He said, “I often get the itch to play and must find a piano. My music is written to tell a story with no words.”

His musical career has taken Thomas in a variety of directions. He has played with bands and been a sound engineer for a variety of internationally known artists within the music video and movie business. His creative juices led Thomas to write a musical screenplay entitled “Bittersuite Joy.” He says that communicating with others through music that enriches their lives spiritually and emotionally is most rewarding.

   In addition to music, Thomas has spent much of his professional life in the field of family counseling. His gentle nature, which has been the inspiration for much of his music, has created a persona that lends itself to helping others with their interpersonal relationships.

Thomas and his wife, Joy, moved to Pagosa in 1991 from the Glenwood Springs and Aspen area. He has a wood finishing and refinishing business.  He works mainly with cabinets and furniture, plus they have been busy remodeling their home. However, he is slowly working his way into the music community of Pagosa.

Tickets for the Art in the Garden festival are $30 and are for sale in advance only. They can be purchased at the Chamber of Commerce, Community United Methodist Church, Higher Grounds Coffee Company, Moonlight Books and The Plaid Pony.


Fun Drums for Kids

ECA’s Fun Drums for Kids, continues this Thursday, Aug.14, at the Pagosa Lakes Clubhouse from 1 to 2 pm. The program continues on Thursday, Aug. 21 and Aug. 28.

Using hands-on experience with drums and other rhythm instruments, as well simple clog dancing steps and body drumming,

Fun Drums for Kids creates a dynamic group environment for youngsters to explore the world of rhythm.

Each Thursday class is $5 per family.

Interested families can call 731-3117 to register and find out more about the program or visit the ECA webpage at elationarts.org for more details.

The Pagosa Lakes Clubhouse is located at 230 Port Ave. in the Vista subdivision of Pagosa Lakes.

Elation Center for the Arts, is a Colorado nonprofit dedicated to preserving our cultural heritage. ECA sponsors fine arts concerts, music and dance classes, and other arts events in the Four Corners area. For more information, view the ECA website at elationarts.org.

Take a greeting card workshop with Denny and Ginnie

Denny Rose and Ginnie Bartlett are again offering their very popular Greeting Card Workshop  under the sponsorship of the Pagosa Springs Arts Council at the community center on Aug. 22 and 23. 

This fun workshop will feature 12 new designs for the holidays and special occasions.  Each day will have demonstrations of six of the 12 designs.

 Twelve sets of Strathmore 140-pound watercolor greeting card stock  and envelopes  will be provided to each participant  for use in replicating the demonstrations of each design. Only basic watercolor supplies, a pencil, eraser and ultra-fine Sharpie pen will be needed for this adult workshop.   If anyone wants to take the workshop and does not have watercolor supplies, Denny and Ginnie have four complete sets of supplies for rent at a minimal fee.

Sign up at the PSAC Gallery at Town Park to reserve your space in this favorite workshop and pick up the supply list. Cost is only $100 for the two days for PSAC members or $125 for non-members.

Arts Line

Group show continues at Town Park Gallery

The exhibit of Denny, Ginnie and the Gang will continue to run until Tuesday, Aug. 19.

The artwork ranges from summer and winter landscape scenes to floral still lifes and much more.

Come by the Town Park Gallery and enjoy the beautiful work done by these local artists.

The Native American Culture Exhibit will open with a reception on Thursday, Aug. 21, from 5-7 p.m.

Summer Youth Art Camp

This workshop, which began July 31, runs through Aug. 29.

Each student will be receiving individual guidance and attention throughout the week. You may attend on a daily basis or sign up for the remainder of the classes. Ages range from 12 through high school.

 Tuition is $30 per student, per day.

Call PSAC at 264-5020, or Sabine Baeckmann-Elge at 769-3635, for more information.

Art in the Garden Festival

The Art in the Garden Festival is a truly wonderful major event that those of you who enjoy fine art, quality entertainment, gourmet food and wine must experience!

Highlights include fine art from local artists, musical entertainment, culinary treats and fine wine all coming together in a tranquil, beautiful garden setting that will delight the senses with color and fragrance. Artists in action will be demonstrating their techniques throughout the grounds.

All money brought in from the Festival will benefit the needy in our community through the Community United Methodist Church (CUMC) Community Assistance Fund.

This event will be held Saturday from 3-7 p.m. in the gardens of Rito Blanco Nursery on Upper Blanco Basin Road (CR 326) south of Pagosa Springs. Ticket prices are $30 and tickets are sold only in advance.

Greeting card workshop

Denny Rose and Ginnie Bartlett are again offering their popular greeting card workshop, Aug. 22 and 23. This fun workshop will feature 12 new designs for the holidays and special occasions. Each day will have demonstrations of six of the 12 designs.

Sign up at Town Park Gallery in order to reserve your space and pick up the supply list. Cost is only $100 for the two days for PSAC members or $125 for nonmembers.

Springs Theatre Company

The Springs Theatre Company August presentation of “Foiled by an Innocent Maid or The Curse of the Iron Horse,” directed by Michael DeWinter, will be seen on Aug. 15 and 16.

Tickets for each of the shows of the Summer Starlight Series are now on sale at The Plaid Pony and online at www.SpringsTheatreCompany.org.  The barbecue supper and show is $28 for adults and $20 for children 12 and under.   For more information on the Summer Starlight Series or for volunteer and sponsorship opportunities, contact Michael DeWinter at 731-5262, Rick Artis at 731-8914 or you may also visit the Web site.

Auditions for STC’s October production of “Clue! The Musical” will be held Friday, Aug. 22, from 6 to 8:30 p.m. and Saturday, Aug. 23, from 9:30 a.m.-1 p.m. Auditions will be help at the Community United Methodist Church, 434 Lewis St.  

Arts Council exhibit schedule

Current — Denny, Ginnie and the Gang.

Aug. 21 — Native American Culture.

Sept. 11 — Youth Art Camp Exhibit.

Oct. 2 — Students of Pierre Mion.

Gallery hours

The PSAC Gallery in Town Park is open Tuesday through Sunday from noon to 4 p.m.. For more information call 264-5020 and visit our Web site at www.Pagosa-Arts.com for additional event information, photographs and more.

PSAC workshop calendar

All of the workshop classes are held in the Arts and Crafts Room of the community center. Call PSAC at 264-5020 to register for any of the classes. Classes may be paid by credit card at the time of registration to reserve your spot. Please Note: You must be pre-registered for all classes. If a class is cancelled, for some reason, we would have no way of contacting people who wish to drop in without a name and phone number on file.

Now-Aug. 29 — Youth Art Camp with Sabine Baeckmann-Elge.

Aug. 13-16 — Basket Weaving with Pat Jeffers.

Aug. 18-21 —  Basket Weaving with Pat Jeffers.

Aug. 22-23 — Watercolor Greeting Cards with Denny and Ginnie.

Sept. 3 — Plein Air Painting at Treasure Falls.

Sept. 6 — Beading with Lizz.

Sept. 8-10 — Oil Painting with Tom Lockhart.

Sept. 13 — Anatomy for Artists with Sabine Baeckmann-Elge.

Oct. 1 — Plein Air Painting at the pond behind River Center.

Oct. 15 — Dried Flower Arranging with Jenny.

Oct. 20 — Watercolor with Pierre Mion.

Nov. 8 — Beading with Lizz.

Plein Air Painters of Pagosa

Landscape painters, who work in any medium, are invited to join the Plein Air Painters of Pagosa (PAPP).  Inspired by the long tradition of artists meeting and painting together, PAPP members paint regularly in a friendly atmosphere, supporting and encouraging each other’s efforts - and have a lot of fun in the process!  Artists at any level are welcome.

The PAPP meets on the first Wednesday of each month, from 10 a.m. until after lunch, at various locations in the Pagosa area. Meet at 10 a.m.  — bring your lunch, and a friend if you know anyone interested. For more information, contact Jean Smith at 264- 6647.

2009 calendars

The 2009 Pagosa Country Calendars are available for sale in the Town Park Gallery. The calendars will sell for $8.95 plus tax for nonmembers and $7.95 plus tax for PSAC members. There are also quantity discounts: 10-24 for $6.95 each and 25-plus for $5.95 each.

Watercolor Club

The Watercolor Club normally meets the third Thursday of each month at 10 a.m. in the Arts and Crafts Room at the community center. Watercolorists of all levels are provided the opportunity to use the room for the day. Attending members contribute $5 for use of the space. Attendees should bring a bag lunch, their supplies and a willingness to have a fun creative day! New participants are always welcome.


The Pagosa Artisan Co-op — a place of belonging

The Pagosa Artisans’ Co-op is well on its way.

The co-op has acquired some outstanding work by a stained glass artist. She also will be doing custom ordered pieces. This is a great addition to our fine arts, jewelry, baskets, cards and photography. Please stop by and see us in the purple house (what used to be the old Artemisia-Satori building) between Kip’s and Farrago’s.

 We are still looking for new and different ideas. Our weekly meetings for the Co-op are Thursday mornings at 10 a.m.  If you want to be a part of this exciting art adventure, call 264-2781.

Fall classes are in the making, starting in September.

• Oils, acrylic, watercolor classes, Instructor, Betty Slade. Fridays, 9 a.m.-noon.

• All medium classes for children 6 and up. Instructor, Soldedad Estrada. Tuesdays and Thursdays, 6-7:30 p.m.

• Wire Wrapping jewelry classes. Instructor, Leslie Kron.

Supply lists at the co-op. Call and reserve your space, 264-2781.

There will be an open house Sept. 21. and 22. Meet the artists; refreshments will be served

Spotlight

Spotlighting Soledad Estrada this week, I asked, “What is your passion?” 

She immediately replied, “Art and children.” Painting at the age of 9 and teaching art at the age of 18 Soledad knows the value of exposing children to art early.

  Soledad believes the co-op offers a place for those who love art, whether mature or not in their own art, and possibly who have never pursued it professionally. They have an opportunity through the co-op to grow and receive help from others. 

 Soledad is known as a portrait painter along with landscapes and horses.  I was curious to ask, “In painting a portrait what are you looking for in a person when you begin?”

 “I see the spirit through the eyes.  It’s very special, it’s not just painting a face, but each person is an unique human being with spirit, how can we not believe there is a creator?  No one is the same.  Even identical twins are different.  It is a wonderful gift that God has in each one of us.

“Before I start a piece, I always ask for guidance, I am connected with everything around me.”

 Paintings of Soledad’s horses hang in the Wild Spirit Gallery and her work is collected by clients from California to New York.

“It doesn’t matter what happens in my life, I continue to paint, it’s a part of me.  My advice to others is if they know they have the gift of creating, trust the gift and go for it.”

 Asking Soledad how she keeps that upbeat and happy countenance that we all see in her, she says, “I’m in touch with myself, in harmony with my creator.  I am happy with myself, I feel love because I love.”

Life in the Artist’s Lane

One purpose: the artist and the work. 

 As an owner of a gallery in the ’90s in Albuquerque, and showing in many galleries over the years, but never being a part of a co-op before, I realized the difference between the two. It’s more than you think.  Probably the biggest difference between a co-op and a gallery is the responsibility. The operation for a gallery primarily depends on one person who has the biggest investment.  That person makes all the decisions and has taken total responsibility of making it successful.  The work, displays, hanging, pricing, cleaning, overhead, selling — “store keeping,” all falls on the gallery owner or manager.

 In a co-op, it is a group working together.  The core group votes on the incoming artists and other decisions, the gallery time is divided among every one, the responsibility is distributed among the artists.  Every one with differing gifts volunteers their talent.  From making the sign, painting walls, writing a newspaper column, getting new artists, everyone takes ownership as to the success of the business. It is more likely to succeed because of the readily resources they have together.

 As I have entered into this relationship with different artists of the same like-mind, I see the unified hearts and vision, and also the diversified ideas in the artwork, and the knowledge they bring with them from their experiences in this crazy thing called “life.”

 The Pagosa Artisan Co-op is truly a place of belonging.  It’s more than where your art hangs, it’s where the artist belongs.  It’s rallying around those who are different and cheering on others with new ideas. Every sale makes the co-op successful so there’s no competition, just a genuine caring for each other and wanting the best for other artists.

 It’s not only a new place in Pagosa but a new place in my heart.  This co-op already holds my affection and I know it also does for others.

 Thank you Pagosa for supporting your artists.

Sign up for new ceramics session at SHY RABBIT

SHY RABBIT Contemporary Arts has added a new Saturday morning session of its popular Ceramics From the Potter’s Wheel I (Introductory) workshop, which will run from 10 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. for five consecutive weeks, starting Sept. 13.

Don’t miss out on this unique opportunity, as class sizes are kept small to provide individualized attention and will fill quickly.

Beginning Ceramics I (Hand-building) is also being offered on Saturday and Sunday, Aug. 23 and 24, providing the perfect opportunity to express your creativity in clay over the course of one weekend or over five weeks.

No previous experience is required for either workshop, and both are open to novice and experienced potters alike. Those with experience will benefit from learning and practicing new techniques in an art friendly environment.

Comments from a previous workshop participant:

“Thank you so much for making Hand-building I such a worthwhile and enjoyable experience. I’m really happy that I took your workshop and look forward to practicing what I’ve learned in all my creative endeavors.”

Beginning Ceramics I (Hand-building)

This two-day introductory workshop focuses on hand forming, texturing and assembling clay, all without the use of a potter’s wheel or other equipment.

Hand forming is also used in the construction and/or finishing of work made on a potter’s wheel, enabling ceramic artists to create unique lids, handles, or decorative flourishes to enhance their wheel-thrown pieces.

Participants of previous ceramic classes have created a wide range of functional, decorative and sculptural works for use or display in their homes and offices, or to give as gifts.

This workshop will be held Saturday and Sunday, Aug. 23 and 24, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. each day.

The glazing date is Saturday, Sept. 13, from 1-4 p.m.

The workshop fee is $215, and includes all materials, glazes, firings and a tool kit that participants may keep for future use.

Ceramics From the Potter’s Wheel I (Introductory)

This five-week introductory course will provide novice and experienced potters alike with a unique opportunity to create functional ceramics on the potter’s wheel under the guidance and encouragement of nationally-recognized professional ceramist D. Michael Coffee.

Ceramics From the Potter’s Wheel I will establish good working fundamentals and principals that will provide a foundation for continuing work on the wheel as well as course advancement, if desired.

This workshop will be held on Saturday mornings, from 10 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., on Sept. 13, 20 and 27 and Oct. 4 and 11. An additional glazing date will be determined.

The workshop fee is $325, and includes all materials, glazes, firings, and a tool kit that participants may keep for future use. Open studio time is also included in the course fee to encourage participants to practice on the wheel in between sessions. Dates and times will be provided upon request.

All workshops are held in SHY RABBIT’s comfortable 1,000 square-foot mixed media studio, and are instructed by D. Michael Coffee. The multi-functional arts facility encompasses 4,000 square feet and also houses a ceramic studio and gallery, a mixed media classroom, and a large exhibition space.

Coffee’s work has been shown in more than 50 national and international exhibitions, and is also included in several prestigious private and corporate collections, including the Vance Kirkland Museum in Denver, and the American Museum of Ceramic Art (AMOCA) in Pomona, Calif., among others.

For additional information on D. Michael Coffee, visit www.dmcarts.com.

For more information on these or any of the workshops offered at SHY RABBIT, visit www.shyrabbit.com and click on the Workshops link at the top of the page.

For space availability or to register, contact Denise Coffee by calling 731-2766. Visa and M/C payment accepted.

SHY RABBIT Contemporary Arts is located at 333 Bastille Drive, two blocks north of U.S.160, off of North Pagosa Boulevard. SHY RABBIT Gallery hours are Thursday through Sunday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., and by appointment.

ECA offers popular drum making class

Elation Center for the Arts offers area residents another chance to make a Native American style frame drum on Sunday, Sept. 7, from 10 AM to 2 PM.

The workshop takes place in a spectacular setting: a private residence on the banks of the Piedra River, with stunning views of Chimney Rock, on the site of an ancient Native American farming community.

A $100 fee includes materials for a 15” elk-hide drum; a functional art project that can provide participants with many years of use and enjoyment. Those that want to make a larger drum may do so if they sign up well in advance for the workshop.

A frame drum is made by stretching an animal hide over a wooden hoop using rawhide sinew. In the Native American tradition, the sound of the drum is likened to the heartbeat of Mother Earth. The drum is the centerpiece of community life, providing the ceremonial foundation for powwows and other social gatherings.

Pagosa artisan Sharon Parker facilitates the workshop. Parker calls herself “The Scottish Indian,” due to her mix of Scottish and Native American ancestry. Her mentor, a Chiricahua White Mountain Apache, taught her the art of making traditional frame drums and rattles. Parker is also a creator of fine jewelry for which she has received many awards.

Join Parker on Sept. 7 to learn the ancient craft of drum making. The workshop is limited to 20 participants. Don’t delay if you would like to participate. Call 731- 3117 to register or make your deposit online at elationarts.org.

Upon registration, you will receive directions to the workshop location.

For those who can’t make this workshop but would like to be a part of a frame-drumming circle, call Carla Roberts at 731-3117.

Elation Center for the Arts, is a Colorado nonprofit dedicated to preserving our cultural heritage.


Annual photography contest celebrates Colorado agriculture

From horses plowing fields and cattle meandering in an aspen grove to the harvest of mountain meadow hay, Colorado agriculture is evident across the state. To showcase the diversity of Colorado agriculture, the “Colorado …i t’s AgriCultural” photography contest is seeking entries for this year’s contest.

 “This annual photo contest celebrates Colorado’s agriculture industry and its importance to the state economy,” said Commissioner of Agriculture John Stulp. “This is the 11th year for the contest, and I encourage photographers of all ages to enter.”

 Entries must be submitted to the Colorado Department of Agriculture with an official entry form by Dec. 31, 2008. All photographs must be taken in the 2008 calendar year and must relate to Colorado agriculture in some way. Prizes will be awarded in four subject areas: crops, livestock, people and agritourism.

 Judging will be based on theme, creativity and technical quality. The photographer whose picture best depicts the “spirit” of Colorado agriculture will receive a Kodak digital camera, and category winners will receive a “Colorado…it’s AgriCultural” prize pack. All winning photographs will be displayed in the Beede-Hamil Agriculture Building at Northeastern Junior College in Sterling, Colo.

Visit www.coloradoagriculture.com/aginsights or call (303) 239-4119 for complete contest rules and an entry form. The contest is sponsored by the Colorado Department of Agriculture, the AgInsights Committee, Kodak and Northeastern Junior College.


Last weekend for barbecue supper and melodrama

The Springs Theatre Company presents the last weekend for its Summer Starlight Series barbecue suppers and shows. The charming, family friendly, 1890s melodrama comedy entitled “Foiled by an Innocent Maid, or The Curse of the Iron Horse” plays Friday and Saturday, Aug. 15 and 16.

Audiences have been delighted by this hysterical production which follows the heroine Faith Hopewell, played by Laura Stine, as she attempts to bring a ray of sunshine into the gloomy lives of the Follansbee family. In residence is hard of hearing matriarch Leticia Carruthers played by Joan Hageman. Rounding out the Follansbee family is Leticia’s poor, depressed daughter, Rachel Follansbee, played by Lizz Baldwin. Doing her best to cheer up this gloomy household is kindly neighbor Maude Filbert portrayed by Stevie Mock. Boo the villainous Ferguson Longfellow played by Kevin Van Maanen and cheer on Ben Owens as Jimmy, the hero, as the plot twists and turns to an uproarious ending. Adding his own special brand of Mellow-drayma is the amazingly talented Professor John Graves on keyboard.

“Foiled” is directed by Springs Theatre Company co-founder and President, Michael DeWinter. Michael and his family moved to Pagosa Springs from Dallas, Texas, 11 years ago. In 1999 he co-founded The Pagosa Players and King’s Men and designed sets and costumes for outdoor Shakespeare performances and successful dinner theatre offerings at the Pagosa Lodge. He directed or appeared in several of these productions as well. Michael has also served on the Archuleta County Fair Board for three years, one as president. He was invited to join the board of Music Boosters in 2001 and successfully served for six and one half years, three and a half as president. He currently sits on the Pagosa Springs Arts Alliance Board of Directors and was responsible for the beginnings of the movement to build a Performing Arts Center in Pagosa Springs. Since moving to town, Michael has been instrumental in over 50 theatrical productions whether appearing on stage, designing sets or costumes, directing or producing. He has donated countless hours and resources to the community of Pagosa Springs. Michael is a degreed interior designer who has an extensive background in theatre including three television commercials.

Before the show, enjoy a chuckwagon barbecue dinner and “Old West” entertainments as well. Guests arrive at the Pioneer Village at Harman Park (U.S. 160 and Piedra Road) to find a variety of activities including a horseshoe pit for adults and children, a rustic sluice where you can pan for gold, square dancing and of course tours of the amazing Fred Harman Art Museum. Calamity Jane the clown is in residence with her trusty steed “Old Paint.” Also village craftsmen and women will be demonstrating techniques in weaving, spinning, tatting and more. The delightful R. C. Gomez mercantile is open for a fascinating tour of the artifacts still stocking the shelves and customers may also do some fun shopping while inside. Delight in watching square dancers perform and be careful or a Wild West gunfight might break out! These preshow activities are open to the public and do not require a ticket purchase.

The dinnerbell will ring at 7 sharp and ticketed patrons will be ushered into the Pavillion tent. Once inside, diners will feast on a supper of barbecue brisket or chicken (or a vegetarian option as well), cowboy beans, fresh cole slaw, warm dinner rolls and butter, hot apple cobbler and lemonade or coffee. At 7:45 the fun continues with “Foiled by An Innocent Maid.”

Tickets are going fast for this last show of the Summer Starlight Series and are on sale now at The Plaid Pony and online at www.SpringsTheatreCompany.org. The barbecue supper and show is $28 for adults and $20 for children 12 and under. For more information on the Summer Starlight Series, upcoming productions or for volunteer, advertising and sponsorship opportunities, contact Michael DeWinter at 731-5262, or Rick Artis at 731-8914, or visit the Web site.

Springs Theatre to hold auditions for ‘Clue, the Musical’

The Springs Theatre Company is holding auditions for its upcoming production of “Clue, The Musical” based on the board game from Parker Brothers. This delightful and interactive romp will be the sixth show of this season for STC and will perform as a Dinner Theatre at the Pagosa Lakes Clubhouse on Oct. 23, 24 and 25. Audiences will be given a playing form, follow the exploits of the six “suspects”, and play along with the clues to determine who done it, in what room, and with what weapon!

“Clue” requires four men of various ages High School and up, and four women of various ages High School and up. Please come prepared to sing a song of your selection and cold read from the script. An accompanist will be provided and no previous stage experience is necessary.

Auditions will be held at the Pagosa Springs Community Center Friday, Aug. 22, from 6 to 8:30 p.m. and Saturday, Aug. 23, from 9:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. For questions or more information call Michael DeWinter at 731-5262 or Rick Artis at 731-8914 or log on to springstheatrecompany.org.

Online, R U really reading?

The New York Times has begun a series of articles that looks at how the Internet and other technological and social forces are changing the way people read.

Literacy is a huge part of our mission at the Sisson Library, so any medium that encourages our children to read is generally applauded. But not everyone agrees that the Internet is good for reading — at least, not as good as a book.

As teenagers’ scores on standardized reading tests have stagnated or declined, some argue that the hours spent prowling the Internet are the enemy of reading. Others say the Internet has created a new kind of reading, one that schools and society should not discount. After all, at least kids on the Internet are not watching television while they are looking up information on Google or some other web site.

Following are some observations excerpted from The Times, which we hope might prompt discussions in your family about the value of reading in all media:

• In an article titled “Is Google Making Us Stupid” in the current issue of Atlantic magazine, Nicholas Carr warns that the Web is changing the way we think. “What the net seems to be doing is chipping away at my capacity for concentration and contemplation,” he wrote, confessing that he now found it difficult to read long books.

• Critics of reading on the Internet say they see no evidence that increased web activity improves reading achievement. “What we are losing in this country and presumably around the world is the sustained, focused, linear attention developed by reading,” said Dana Gioia, chairman of the National Endowment for the Arts.

• Literacy specialists are just beginning to investigate how reading on the Internet affects reading skills. A recent study of more than 700 low-income, mostly Hispanic and black sixth through 10th-graders in Detroit found that those students read more on the web than in any other medium, although they also read books. The only kind of reading that related to higher academic performance was frequent novel reading, which predicted better grades in English and higher overall grade point averages.

• But another study showed that giving home Internet access to low-income students appeared to improve standardized reading tests scores and school grades.

“These were kids who would typically not be reading in their free time,” said Linda A. Jackson, a psychology professor at Michigan State who led the research. “Once they’re on the Internet, they’re reading.”

• Elizabeth Birr Moje, a professor at the University of Michigan, said novel reading is similar to what schools demand already. But on the Internet, she said, students are developing new reading skills that are neither taught nor evaluated in schools.

• Web proponents believe that strong readers on the Web may eventually surpass those who rely on books. Reading five web sites, an op-ed article and a blog post or two, experts say, can be more enriching than reading one book. “It takes a long time to read a 400-page book,” said Rand J. Spiro, a professor of educational psychology at Michigan State. “In a tenth of the time, the Internet allows a reader to cover a lot more of the topic from different points of view.”

• Others argue that incorrect information on the Internet is dangerous. Web readers often are poor at judging whether information is trustworthy, frequently citing sites as reliable when information on them is patently false.

Over time, we no doubt will be learning more about the pros and cons of Internet reading. Next year, for the first time, the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development, which administers reading, math and science tests to a sample of 15-year-old students in more than 50 countries, will add an electronic reading component. The United States, among other countries, will not participate because the Department of Education said an additional test would overburden schools.

New novels

“The Boys in the Trees” by Mary Swan looks at a tragic event at the turn of the 20th century in a small, close-knit community that affects not only the family involved but also most of the town.

“On the Occasion of My Last Afternoon” by Kaye Gibbons is a story about slavery and the Civil War, with a heroine born to privilege on a James River plantation.

“One Big Damn Puzzler” by John Harding explores the collision of the 21st century with unsullied pagan reality when a do-gooder white man arrives on an island paradise.

Large print books

“Moscow Rules” by Daniel Silva is a spy novel set not in the grim, grey Moscow of Soviet times but a new Moscow awash with oil wealth and bulletproof Bentleys.

Westerns

We have three more Louis L’Amour westerns. “Get Rid of the Kid” is a tale about an abandoned four-year-old boy who is taken in by a gentleman gambler who is the best rifle shot in the West. “To Tame a Land” chronicles the life of a hardened man who faces his deadliest enemy in an outlaw fortress — the very man who taught him about manhood and friendship. “From the Listening Hills” is a collection of 12 stories appearing for the first time in one complete volume.

Mysteries and thrillers

“Cape Perdido” by Marcia Muller tells of an out-of-state corporation willing to do almost anything to take water from a California river for southern California’s thirsty cities.

“Slipping into Darkness” by Peter Blauner is a novel of suspense about two men, two murders and a terrifying resolution to a 22-year-old secret that author Stephen King called “one of the best books I’ve read in a long, long time.”

“The Copper Scroll” is the fourth thriller by Joel C. Rosenberg, a bestselling author whose plots in his first three novels on a hijacked jet, deaths in Gaza and a new Russian-Iran alliance all ended up coming true.

Sci-fi and supernatural

“The Draco Tavern” is a collection of 26 tales and vignettes by bestselling science fiction author Larry Niven about visiting aliens and residents of a permanent spaceport in Siberia.

“The Last Days of Krypton” by Kevin J. Anderson is the story of the vision and bravery of Kal-El’s parents before their planet is torn apart and their son comes to Earth as Superman.

Thanks to our donors

For books and materials this week, we thank Meryle Backus, Katherine Baughman, Lisa Brown, Barbara Carlos, Richard Clare, E. G. Colton, Julie Creech, Barb Draper, Joelle England, Marti Gallo, Judy Giberson, Martin and Kathleen Golden, Kathy Hamilton, Dawn Hollenbeck, Anita Hooton, Kay Grams, Joan Jessen, Abigail Saladino, Doug Schultz, Rex Shurtleff, Norman Slague, Lynne Stinchfield, Jarrel Tyson, Bill Wiggins and Codie Wilson.


Shingles vaccine – what you need to know

Shingles is a painful skin rash, often with blisters. It is also called Herpes Zoster. A shingles rash usually appears on one side of the face or body and lasts from two to four weeks. Its main symptom is pain, which can be quite severe. Other symptoms of shingles can include fever, headache, chills and upset stomach. Very rarely, a shingles infection can lead to pneumonia, hearing problems, blindness, brain inflammation (encephalitis) or death. For about one person in five, severe pain can continue even after the rash clears up. This is called post-herpetic neuralgia.

Shingles is caused by the Varicella Zoster virus, the same virus that causes chickenpox. Only someone who has had a case of chickenpox — or gotten chickenpox vaccine — can get shingles. The virus stays in your body. It can reappear many years later to cause a case of shingles. You can’t catch shingles from another person with shingles. However, a person who has never had chickenpox (or chickenpox vaccine) could get chickenpox from someone with shingles. This is not very common.

Shingles is far more common in people 50 and older than in younger people. It is also more common in people whose immune systems are weakened because of a disease such as cancer, or drugs such as steroids or chemotherapy. At least one million people a year in the United States get shingles. A vaccine for shingles was licensed in 2006. In clinical trials, the vaccine prevented shingles in about half of people 60 years of age and older. It can also reduce the pain associated with shingles. A single dose of shingles vaccine is indicated for adults 60 years of age and older.

Some people should not get shingles vaccine or should wait. A person should not get shingles vaccine who:

• has ever had a life-threatening allergic reaction to gelatin, the antibiotic neomycin, or any other component of shingles vaccine. Tell your doctor if you have any severe allergies.

• has a weakened immune system because of HIV/AIDS or another disease that affects the immune system; treatment with drugs that affect the immune system, such as steroids; cancer treatment such as radiation or chemotherapy; a history of cancer affecting the bone marrow or lymphatic system, such as leukemia or lymphoma; and has active, untreated tuberculosis.

• is pregnant, or might be pregnant. Women should not become pregnant until at least three months after getting shingles vaccine.

Someone with a minor illness, such as a cold, may be vaccinated. But anyone who is moderately or severely ill should usually wait until they recover before getting the vaccine. This includes anyone with a temperature of 101.3 or higher.

What are the risks from shingles vaccine: A vaccine, like any medicine, could possibly cause serious problems, such as severe allergic reactions. However, the risk of a vaccine causing serious harm or death is extremely small. No serious problems have been identified with shingles vaccine. Mild problems may include redness, soreness, swelling or itching at the site of the injection (about one in three persons, and headache (about one person in 70).

Like all vaccines, shingles vaccine is being closely monitored for unusual or severe problems.

A moderate or severe reaction may have unusual conditions, such as a high fever or behavior changes. Signs of a serious allergic reaction can include difficulty breathing, hoarseness or wheezing, hives, paleness, weakness, a fast heart beat or dizziness. These usually occur within the first few hours after vaccination. You should call a doctor, or get the person to a doctor right away. Tell your doctor what happened, the date and time it happened, and when the vaccination was given. Ask your doctor, nurse, or health department to report the reaction by filing a Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS) form. Or you can file this report through the VAERS Web site at www.vaers.hhs.gov, or by calling (800) 822-7967. VAERS does not provide medical advice.

How can you learn more?

Your provider can give you the vaccine package insert or suggest other sources of information. Call your local health department at 264-2409. Contact Centers for Disease Control and Prevention at (CDC): Call (800) 232-4636 or visit CDC’s Web site at www.cdc.gov/nip.

Special events

Flamingo Fling (or Pretty in Pink) Picnic in the Park. Join us for the third and final summer of Picnic in the Park on Friday at noon at Town Park. Prizes will be awarded for the pinkest attire, most resembling a flamingo, and in the flamingo Trivia Quiz. Menu is honey barbecue chicken, scalloped potatoes, Mexicali corn, creamy coleslaw, grapes, whole wheat roll and pink cupcakes. Those with reservations will be served first.

Meditation for Healing. On Tuesdays at 1 p.m. Sarah Barbara hosts the weekly Meditation for Healing program and will teach you how to meditate and reap the healing benefits of the practice. This program is free.

Sky Ute Casino. Step into the action and play to have fun during our monthly trip to Sky Ute Casino on Tuesday, Aug. 19, at 1 p.m. Free transportation (with limited seating) provided. Sky Ute bus leaves The Den at 1 p.m. and returns approximately 5:45. This is a popular trip, so be sure to call and sign up today.

Ice cream social. The Silver Foxes Den will host an ice cream social on Wednesday, Aug. 20, at 12:30 directly following lunch.

Bring your favorite topping to share and help us create a topping bar. The cost is 50 cents.

Free movie and popcorn. “In the Shadow of the Moon” is a movie about the Apollo Space program. Between 1968 and 1972, nine American spacecraft voyaged to the Moon, and 12 men walked upon its surface. The movie brings together for the first, and possibly the last, time surviving crew members from every single Apollo mission that flew to the Moon along with visually stunning archival material re-mastered from the original NASA film footage. The result is an intimate epic that vividly communicates the daring, the danger, the pride, and the promise of this extraordinary era in history when the whole world literally looked up at America. The film will be presented at the Silver Foxes Den on Wednesday, Aug. 20, at 1 p.m.

Astraddle-A-Saddle barbecue. The terrific folks at Astraddle-A-Saddle are offering our seniors a $15 discount on a chuckwagon barbecue Wednesday, Aug. 20, at 5 p.m. You will enjoy a wagon ride in the wonderful Colorado Rockies, feast on a full barbecue of chicken, beef or pork, salads, sides and pie. Then tell stories around the campfire to top off your evening. The cost for this event is $20. You will need to arrive at Astraddle-A-Saddle by 4:45 as the wagon will depart at 5 p.m. Reserve your place by Aug. 15 by stopping in at The Senior Cultural Center.

Silver Foxes Book Club. Do you love to read? Do you have a desire to discuss what you read in a group setting, with inquiring minds? Then we have just the thing for you. Kathy Hamilton from the Sisson Library hosts the Silver Foxes Book Club on the fourth Friday of every month at 10:30 a.m. in the Den. Kathy can also obtain books on CD, cassette and in large print. Stop by the Silver Foxes Den to sign up or call 264-2167.

Dance For Health. On Wednesdays at 10 a.m. Karma Raley, the dance instructor, enjoys sharing her love of dance and blends basic ballet and modern jazz with yoga awareness to create a full body routine which makes it possible to work out to the degree you want and/or need to. Wear loose comfortable clothing and bring a mat or towel. This program is free.

Tai Chi classes

Tai Chi from the Arthritis Foundation is a high-value program designed to improve the quality of life for people with arthritis. Studies show the effects of Tai Chi also improve balance and help prevent falls. Each class will begin with very gentle warm up and cool down Sun style Tai Chi exercises. The class will be led by Kay Wilson, Tai Chi instructor certified by Dr. Paul Lam Program, which is supported by the Arthritis Foundation. This free eight-week series begins Sept. 8 at 10 a.m. For class information, call 946-5220; registration must take place at The Den or you may request a registration packet be mailed to you. Participation is limited to 10.

A special thanks

The Silver Foxes Den would like to thank Doris Whitcomb, of The Den’s Medicare program, for providing the Den with a beautiful door prize for all visitors to the Silver Foxes Den county fair table. She painted a ceramic pot to resemble a watermelon with ants crawling on it, and then placed a beautiful geranium in the pot. Kathy Betts is the lucky winner of the Silver Foxes Den door prize. Congrats and many thanks to Doris for the lovely flower pot and plant she donated.

Medicare counseling

Medicare Counseling is available by appointment should you need assistance. Call the Silver Foxes Den at 264-2167 to make your appointment.

Emergency plan

As part of the Archuleta County Emergency Plan, the Silver Foxes Den Senior Center is creating a list of people of all ages that may need assistance in the event of an emergency such as a blizzard, power outage, flood, etc. Folks on oxygen or an electric dependent health system should be on the list as well as anyone with a disability, which could make it difficult for them to evacuate. If you think that you may be in need of assistance during an emergency, contact Kat at 264-2167. Don’t delay be prepared today.

Add pennies to your pocket

We have an affordable solution for you to get where you need to go: The Silver Foxes bus can pick you up and bring you to lunch and activities at the Den (suggested senior donation of $2). The bus will make stops anywhere along the route (post office, drug store, City Market shopping, Tuesdays and Fridays). And the best salad bar in town is available Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday and Friday.

Activities

Friday, Aug. 15 — 9 a.m. Geezers; noon Picnic in the Park.

Monday, Aug. 18 — 9 a.m. Nails by JoLyne; 10 a.m. Tai Chi; 11:15 a.m. Gym Walk; 1 p.m .Canasta.

Tuesday, Aug 19 — 11 a.m. blood pressure check; 11:15 a.m. Gym walk; 1 p.m. Meditation for Healing or Sky Ute Casino.

Wednesday, Aug. 20 — 10 a.m. Dance 4 Health; 12:30 ice cream social; 1 p.m. free movie; 5 p.m. Astraddle-A-Saddle barbecue.

Thursday, Aug. 21 — Closed.

Friday, Aug. 22 — 9 a.m. Geezers; 10:30 a.m. Book Club; 11:15 Gym Walk.

Menu

Suggested donation $3 for ages 60-plus and kids 12 and under; all others $5. Our meal program is partially funded through the Older Americans Act, United Way, Archuleta County, Town of Pagosa Springs and other contributions and grants. These funds help support the cost of the meal, which is approximately $6. Menu subject to change. The salad bar opens at 11:30 a.m. with lunch served at noon.

Friday, Aug, 15 — Honey barbecue chicken, scalloped potatoes, Mexicali corn, creamy coleslaw, grapes, whole wheat roll.

Monday, Aug. 18 — Corned beef sandwich, green beans with tomatoes, creamy coleslaw, sliced peaches.

Tuesday, Aug. 19 — Citrus chicken, baked potato, peas, acini di pepe, fruit.

Wednesday, Aug. 20 — Salmon patties with cream sauce, brown rice, mixed veggies, lime honeydew melon, whole wheat roll.

Thursday, Aug. 21 — Closed.

Friday, Aug. 22 — Sloppy Joes, scalloped potatoes, broccoli and carrots, apple.

DAV van available from Durango

UU Fellowship considers the African experience

On Sunday, Aug. 17, the Pagosah Unitarian Universalist Fellowship will consider “The Trials, Tribulations, and Joys of Farming in Africa,” in a presentation by Pagosa resident, Eddie Bennett.

Born in England, Eddie left there as a teenager. After serving in the Royal Air Force, he lived in the Far East, then India and the Middle East before moving to the Zambesi Valley in Africa.

He had homes and business interests in Zambia and Rhodesia/Zimbabwe, including a 13,000 acre farm. Lions, leopards, and other wildlife presented more problems than domestic livestock, to say nothing of snakes, spiders, scorpions and centipedes. With 300 people living in two villages on the farm and having to deal with their personal, domestic and other issues, life was never boring. The farm also served as a base for safaris.

The children’s program will continue preparations for their play during the Sept. 7 Water Ceremony. They will practice the songs Peace Like a River and De Colores. Children should come ready to sing and put the finishing touches on their costumes.

The service begins at 10:30 a.m. in the Pagosah Unitarian Universalist Fellowship Hall, Unit B 15, Greenbriar Plaza. Turn east on Greenbrier Drive off of North Pagosa by the fire station, then left into the back parking lot and look for the big sign. All are welcome.

Shamrock Festival of
St. Patrick’s kicks off with dinner and auction

On Friday, Sept. 5, the Shamrock Festival at St. Patrick’s Episcopal Church will officially begin with a dinner and silent auction.

Auction volunteer chairs Janelle Pendleton, Bonnie Brooks and Carolyn Shipman have put together a beautiful assortment of auction items from carwashes to a vacation getaway. These items will be ready to preview and bid on beginning at 3:30 p.m. at St. Patrick’s Church at 225 S. Pagosa Blvd.

Doors will open for a catered dinner by Matt Degelmann, “Chef Degs,” beginning with a cash bar at 5 p.m. with dinner to follow under the tent. Dinner will include salmon and chicken assorted seasonal veggies and potatoes, salad, roll and cobbler for dessert. The auction will close at 8 p.m. with music provided by Mark DeVoti throughout the evening. All proceeds from the dinner and auction will go to outreach programs throughout Pagosa Springs. Past recipients included Operation Helping Hand, Loaves and Fishes, Women Helping Women, Habitat for Humanity and ACVAP, to name a few.

Other items donated to this event include a custom-made oak hall tree made by Chip Neal, beautiful handcrafted items by David Brooks, artwork, catered dinners and a Princess Birthday party for 10, gift certificates for dinners at local restaurants and a week at Keystone. There are over 50 items to bid on throughout the event.

Tickets are $20 each and a table for 8-10 can be reserved. Call the church office for tickets 731-5801, or Joanne Irons at 946-7545.

Children’s Boutique

Julie Greenly of St. Patrick’s Church is heading up the new Children’s Boutique at the Shamrock Festival this year. Gently used clothing and items for children will be sold Saturday Sept. 6, from 8:30 a.m.-2 p.m. It is a great time to pick up items for the coming year. If you have items to donate for the event, you can reach Julie at 731- 9947.

Methodists sponsor mission study school

The Community Methodist Church women and the Rocky Mountain Methodist Church conference are co-sponsoring a mission study school at the Centerpoint Church Aug. 23 from 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m.

Due to construction on Lewis Street, the event is being held at Centerpoint Church.

Those enrolled will choose between three classes. A class on Israel/Palestine will be taught by Brenda Moland. This class will enable students to learn about the history and complexities of relationships between Israel and Palestine. Students will explore and understand the concepts of security and freedom that dominate the lives of these peoples. Students will learn of the impact of conflict on women and children and the abuse of religion on mid-eastern and U.S. policy.

A second class will be on Native American survival. The purposes of this study, taught by Donna Jacobs, are to learn about the inter-relatedness between the indigenous peoples and their land, to identify key issues affecting the Native Americans in the U.S., and to examine the root causes of the issues, to understand and appreciate the “give away” culture of the Native Americans in the areas of spirituality, ecology, language, story telling and food, and to lead participants to act as responsible U.S. citizens.

A third class is called “I believe in Jesus,” taught by the Rev. Pam Eberhardt.


Back to Shul Night at Har Shalom

The schedule for the remainder of August at Har Shalom in Durango is as follows:

• Aug. 22-24 — Back to Shul Shabbaton with Rabbi Baskin.

• Aug. 22 — 5:30 p.m., Har Shalom will hold “Back to Shul Night” and religious school kickoff, n open house to introduce the synagogue and its programs.   Meet the rabbi, check out the gift shop and library, and learn more about Jewish life in the Four Corners. Dinner and service. Call 375-0613 for information.

• Aug. 23 — 10 a.m. Torah service. Noon, BYOLunch followed by float down the river (1 p.m.) at 32nd Street put-in. Share inspiring stories from Jewish tradition about crossing the river.

• Aug. 24 — 9:30 a.m. Judaism 360: Breakfast and HHD spiritual prep.


No cell service

Can you hear me now? If you are a Pagosa Springs High School student with a cell phone, inside the school building after the start of classes, the answer is: ”No.” Same answer if the question is “Can you text me now?”

With cell phones everywhere, and in particular since text messaging took hold, what was once a nuisance has become a hindrance to the educational process.

District administrators have called a halt. A student at the high school can tote a cell phone into the building but, once the school day begins, until the final bell sounds, that phone will be off. Or it will be gone. No more rings, vibrations, texting.

The reason: The proliferation of devices has led to a verifiable problem: distraction and, in many cases, cheating. Cell phone use has eroded the kind of conduct deemed conducive, in administrators’ and teachers’ minds, to a productive learning environment.

We applaud the restriction on the grounds it is a move toward decorum and civil, attentive behavior — things increasingly rare in a society in which far too many children control the wills of weak parents. Any regulation that seeks to stem the rampant self-indulgence that comes at the expense of decent behavior and marginal academic accomplishment is worthy.

But, here is what we wonder: While we do not doubt the deleterious effect of high-tech devices on learning, and particularly on the development of certain fundamental skills — social, academic and otherwise — we question whether what is being learned in our schools has been properly examined at the same time the distractions have been identified. Granted, there is increasing evidence that high media involvement is often associated with low academic achievement and skill development, but does this perception lead legislators and education industry leaders — salaried and elected — to ask what kind of learning and skills are hampered?

How often, with the fascination with CSAP and skills-test oriented standards and practices, do we ask whether the skills and talents taught and measured are those that will best serve youngsters as they move into what is, certifiably, a very different world than the one faced by the previous generation? Will a prolonged attention span help? Are traditional math and language skills needed in a world in which a large number of youngsters will skip from one shallow occupation to another, by those grads who will move on to cubicles, or to darkened basement rooms equipped with a computer offering video games and Internet experiences to the chronically underemployed? Where is the creativity? What are the problem solving skills that will be needed to compete effectively, and are they being taught?

We think something lurks beyond a ban on cell phone use— a need to seriously think out the nature of public education; to ask whether it will produce drones, or be transformed, deflected from meaningless standards and a preoccupation with testing, and turned to the realities of a new world.

While we wait for a deeper discussion, best of luck to the administrators who instituted a needed regulation. No doubt, there are plenty of parachute parents who will not understand why their babies are being “punished.” After all, the kiddies are honor students. And there will be those who will not understand why they cannot call their child during a class. After all, they are best friends. Mom has even learned to text.

Let’s move beyond bans on cell phones to begin a discussion about the changes that must occur in curriculum and methods, about the need to break the bureaucratic and legislative stranglehold on learning and move to standards and a style of public education that provides students with a real advantage, with skills that will serve them well.

Karl Isberg


Scammed 

Dear Editor:

Well, I just got scammed out of $1,400 for a nice laptop I really needed, and although I’ve not had any expectations of getting the money back, I intend to spread the word that Internet scams are rampant and most difficult to stop. Prevention is the best course of action, so please, beware!

 Even reporting the crime to prevent a con from scamming others is complex and most entities are not about to take on investigation. The Durango FBI said there are simply too many of them. The federal FBI Web site accepts the info and will assist in finding the appropriate entity to which a report could be made. Of course, all this just means there will be more and more of these crimes, because no one is going after them and it’s very lucrative. Just imagine how many times this criminal could sell the same computer!

 In my own weak defense, I really felt I had done my due diligence and research, as you can see from the enclosed report that you are welcome to draw from if you choose to write an article on this topic to emphasize to people that this is very big business these days. The details show how elaborate the scam can be ...

I actually have camera times at two locations, e-mail addresses, a phone number, a serial number from the supposed computer which I called Apple on, which not only exists, but has another year on the warranty as advertised. It seems he could be identified, even if only to find it was stolen. My credit union is tracking down the police in that location, which I could not verify with anyone, but think is Redding, Calif. It was a Boulder Craig’s List item, so initially I thought I might rendezvous with the guy or have someone else do it, but then he turned up on vacation in California with his family. Oh, well! He was very polite, and sweet, and seemed most trustworthy. 

You can’t blame sites like craigslist.com. They inserted a warning right on the e-mail, which even though I studied, I ignored, because this kid was so nice. I had a really good laugh when I later checked out the properties on his name on the e-mail: scarsandstripes101 — if that doesn’t say it all. Done with this type of lesson. Now, if others would just take heed.

Karen Aspin

Home Rule

Dear Editor:

The possibility of Home Rule coming to Archuleta County will appear on the November ballot. But it is still only a possibility and that possibility is still far off. The voters who support Home Rule will be asked to choose an 11-member body to formulate a charter which, if approved by the voters sometime next year, will replace the present one-size-fits-all-counties structure prescribed for us in the State Constitution more than a hundred years ago.

So the work is not done yet. As a matter of fact, the most difficult parts lie straight ahead. But they are the most exciting parts of the process because those charter writers will be the ones designing the future.

Imagine what it might have been like that summer in Philadelphia when the Founding Fathers gathered to write the Constitution. They all had their own ideas — what they wanted, what they didn’t want, what they liked, what they feared — and no idea of what the outcome would be. But they stuck it out and produced a Constitution that has worked for more than 250 years, even though skeptics at the time, including George Washington, prophesied little more than two years.

In this respect, the 11-member Home Rule Charter Commission will be very much like that convention in Philadelphia. In the educational meetings held prior to the petition process which has placed the issue on the November ballot individual citizens from all corners expressed those same kinds of feelings, pointing to the structure of our county government. Having had their say at the meetings, it is now time for them to come forward and be a part of the next step, the actual working out their concerns in the preparation of the charter. There is so much agreement already that this will not be an undaunted task.

Getting on that charter writing panel isn’t difficult. The County Clerk has the petitions and other forms ready and waiting. There is no charge. All you need to submit before Aug. 25 are 25 valid signatures from your neighbors and friends who, you may be surprised, turn out to be eager supporters and admirers of what you will be doing. If the total electorate chooses you to be one of those 11, then I believe you are in for one of the most fulfilling experiences anyone could have.

The Home Rule Charter will not be a perfect document. None of the state constitutions nor the U.S. Constitution ever were. All of them have had to be amended several times. The beauty of them, though, is that they define dynamic governmental structures that can change with time and need. For anyone to be a part of designing this, I believe, would be very exciting.

Don’t just think about it.

Henry Buslepp

TreeTops

Dear Editor:

I have been a full-time resident and business owner in Pagosa for a number of years. I am not an investor in the TreeTops project and have no financial connection at all with it, though I wish I could afford to be involved. I do know the people whose vision it is, and I think very highly of them and I know how passionate they are about the type of project it is and the land it is located on. I also know a lot about the project itself, and I can tell you that it is one of the most beautiful and environmentally responsible developments anywhere.

I understand that there are a few people who are still caught up in the county problems and personnel issues that nearly destroyed the county last year, and that they are spreading misinformation about the TreeTops project because of their personal agendas. Anyone who opposes the TreeTops project because they were given incorrect information by these people need to let those people know they do not appreciate being lied to. Everyone, please be clear about the facts: there is no Wal-Mart, City Market, big box store, gas stations, bright lights, loud noise and excessive traffic planned up there.

The opposite is true. The TreeTops people are just as opposed to those things as the rest of us are. If you want to know what the plan does contain, call Treetops and ask for a briefing. They are doing that constantly to try to get the correct information out. If you still want to oppose it, at least do so with the proper facts. One last thing I want to say: as a community we say that we don’t want big outside developers in here who don’t care about Pagosa. If that is true then we need to get behind our local friends and neighbors who created the TreeTops vision, who are not wealthy people, and not bankrupt them with constant delays because the county does not have its processes together. They want to work with everyone to create something that can be an example for future developments. I think that is what we want.

Marianne Caprioli

Brungard tribute

Dear Editor:

A tribute to family, friendship and team work, Aug. 11, 2008.

John W. Brungard, Jr.

“Be grateful for every living minute.”

The minutes and moments at your memorial are some of the best. Family, friends and the community all came together to pay tribute to your “legacy.” As you proudly spoke of your father many times, and of his picture, proudly displayed at the VFW in Albuquerque, your father’s “legacy” as a Pearl Harbor survivor shall not be forgotten. “Honor your mother and your father.” You are an individual who has set an example for us all. Your legacy to family, friends and the community shall survive. We all can all be inspired by your example and daily random acts of kindness. Your physical body may have passed from this earth; your spirit and the celebration of your can live on in each of us. Honor the individual, celebrate the life and keep the spirit and legacy alive. We shall meet again and I will pray you are standing at those pearly gates to meet me. Thank you for your friendship, counseling and guidance. I am a better man, thanks to your special gift. A gift of friendship, a true tribute.

“W.C.” Clifford-Basnett

Not appropriate

Dear Editor:

Bob Moomaw’s letter to the editor should have been avoided. Yes, it is not appropriate for a sitting commissioner to publicly take issue with the campaign practices of a fellow commissioner.

The public needs to take issue with Mr. Moomaw’s performance and judge Ms. Schiro’s on her performance. As I recall, and former press releases will confirm, you represented on all three commissioners with your childish unprofessional actions ignoring and belittling Ms. Shiro (sic) while receiving an occasion nod from Ms. Zaday. Ms. Zaday who at that time had become shell shocked by county business and personal affairs choose to take a passive position and allowed you to control.

Mr. Moomaw, you prioritized funds from road maintenance to an airport project. Justifying your decision was based on the revenue generating abilities is questionable. The benefits to a limited number of citizens can not be outweighed by permanent, seasonal, and timeshare population. Mr. Moomaw, you failed to create the airport income as a separate line item thus placing success or failure on your shoulders only. Mr. Moomaw, you did find this as a way to avoid the most pressing issue in the county, lack of road maintenance. Unfortunately, Ms. Shiro (sic) within the first few months in office stood up to the notorious “Road and Bridge Gang” and has paid the price for her professional inquiry. Ms. Shiro (sic) questioned the county’s Road and Bridge department hoping to increase productivity by making them accountable and soon learned that one does not question the Archuleta way of doing business. If Mr. Moomaw were the fix it guy he wishes to portray, he too would look long and hard at budget items involving Road and Bridge. Equipment cost, supplies, inadequate supervision, benefits, and payroll with no assurance of substandard services provided should be questioned. Outsourcing via contract could end years of uncontrolled spending and reduce budget balances that county official are unable to manage. Leaving citizens with an assurance of services not currently available is what a prudent commissioner would focus on, not petty grievances.

If you remember, after taking control of the of the Commission, Mr. Moomaw went on the road with little Bobby Campbell singing the praises of their actions by balancing budgets, trimming fat from the lower level positions and hiring new department heads more able to work within the Archuleta system. Shortly there after Mr. Campbell along with questionable new hires were gone and it is discovered that the balance in Mr. Moomaw’s budget was a one million dollar income error. Mr. Moomaw, have you admitted your mistakes?

Mr. Moomaw, you are responsible for the questioned budget, Ms. Shiro (sic) has been unfairly reprimanded publicly by you for asking the questions citizens want answered. Ms. Zaday at least had the insight to soft pedal spoken and written words during her term and current election process. Re-election is based on qualifications coupled with the ability to work with others and early in your term Mr. Moomaw, you have shown neither.

Lyle Bergen

Roadless

Dear Editor:

Colorado roadless rule means more roads.

If you enjoy horseback riding where there are few roads the Forest Service’s proposed Colorado Roadless Rule will mean more roads, not less. The roadless areas found here have characteristics rarely found elsewhere in the Southern Rockies Ecoregion.

The HD Mountains have some of the finest stands of old-growth Ponderosa pine left in the San Juans. The roadless areas around the Piedra River have some of the largest expanse of contiguous, undeveloped forest remaining in Colorado. Devil Creek has much of the last 5 percent of the remaining old-growth Ponderosa stands in the San Juans. The roadless area around the South San Juan Wilderness is considered one of the wildest places left in the Southern Rockies Ecoregion. The proposed Martinez Creek Research Natural Area contains the largest know area of old-growth spruce-fir forest in the San Juans.

Roadless areas are critical to outfitters, ranchers, hunters and horseback riders. Roadless areas provide a place to ride where there is less chance of horse/vehicle problems. Trail riding provides a quiet retreat from our busy lives and quiet is the best way to communicate with a horse.

In 2001, the Forest Service issued the Roadless Area Conservation Rule. The Forest Service has written new management rules just for Colorado’s roadless areas. This rule would provide less protection than found in any other state. The rule will allow new roads for fire protection in areas long distances from any home, oil and gas leasing, new power lines, new water transportation routes, and where new ski areas could be built. Unlimited logging to protect/improve wildlife habitat when the greatest threat to wildlife is us.

Letters are needed by Oct. 22 — Roadless Area Conservation—Colorado, P.O. Box 162909, Sacramento, CA 95816–2909, e-mail COcomments@fsroadless.org, fax (916) 456–6724.

Briefly describe your trail riding in local roadless areas and the importance they have for you as a rider. State your support in the protection of these lands for their ecological benefits as well as your own personal enjoyment. State that you support the 2001 Roadless Rule but not the new Colorado Roadless rule. Points to include: no new roads, logging, coal mining or powerlines and no new oil and gas leases, pipelines or compressor stations.

Attend the Forest Service open house, Aug. 20, 5-8:30 p.m., Fort Lewis College Ballroom, Durango. For more information: www.roadless.fs.fed.us/colorado.shtml. For an environmental viewpoint: Colorado Wild: www.coloradowild.org. For an in-depth description of local roadless areas go to San Juan Citizens Alliance: www.sanjuancitizens.org

If you trail ride and would like to help protect our local public lands please contact me. I am interested in forming a loose group of riders that love to trail ride and believe that making the ecological health of our landscape a priority is the best way to protect the quality of our trail riding. Bevkresz@centurytel.net.

Beverly Compton

Torture hidden

Dear Editor:

Jim Sawicki again attempts to justify torture; so again, I must protest this subversion of our Constitution and national security. Jim, you are too good a man to use distortions as a means of furthering your aims.

September 11 a “figment of television and movie imagination?” Balderdash: 9/11 was real and torture was ineffective in either detection or prevention.

No Geneva Convention for “individuals that take up arms and are not wearing a uniform or are a member of a formal military organization?” Good grief! Then surely you have no complaint with the British treatment of our revolutionary Minutemen. 

Our armed forces “will never achieve anything” if they question suspects in a responsible, legal and moral manner? Nuts! The effectiveness of our armed forces in both Iraq and Afghanistan comes from their professionalism and discipline. The tortures at Abu Ghraib (2004) and the excesses of my fellow Marines in Haditha (2005) were notable for being aberrations not tolerated by an effective, professional military.

 It’s one thing to leap to excesses in the heat of battle surrounded by close personal danger, confusion and conflicting intelligence. It’s something else, Jim, to advocate institutionalizing torture to be coldly delivered by our government against any individual “identified as a true enemy.” 

 Talk with a detective trained in interrogation techniques, Jim. No need for rubber hoses, electrodes, or water boards to get reliable information that stands up to scrutiny. 

Jim asserts having 33 years military service and performing duties he did not agree with. I honor his service, and identify with his disagreements. Performing disagreeable duties, however, is not the same as performing illegal acts.

Both Jim and I served under the Uniform Code of Military Justice. The UCMJ is clear that we were to obey lawful orders (Article 92). Lawful, Jim, lawful. 

I read the SUN announcements about our young people entering military service. I hope and pray their officers and NCOs lead them to an effective, lawful and honorable service. 

Torturing someone “identified as a terrorist” is not effective in gathering reliable information on which my Marines can bet their lives. Torture tarnishes our honor, increases the risk to our soldiers and contractors, endangers our national security, and marks our country as a hypocrite when trying to promote individual freedom in the World.  

Jim, please stop inciting people to illegal activities. We can — and should — do better by our young people, armed services and communities.

Semper Fi,

Jay Davison

Governor’s forum

Dear Editor:

United Way of Southwest Colorado in Archuleta County is in the business of bringing people and resources together to build a strong, healthy and safe community for all. The Governor’s Commission on Community Service Forum was an initial step in this process.

On Thursday, Aug. 7, over 80 volunteers gathered at the Pagosa Springs Community Center to share perspectives on the needs of Archuleta County. Dr. Janet Mickish, Community Planning and Volunteer Service Initiative Coordinator from the office of Lt. Gov. Barbara O’Brien, conducted a needs assessment of our community. She asked volunteers to describe their community, discuss the positive aspects of our community, and share the most important issues facing our community today. The 80 volunteers defined roles that volunteers play in addressing the community’s issues and listed multiple supports the community needs to expand services, volunteerism, and civic engagement that will address our current and emerging needs.

During the 90 minutes, I believe Archuleta County volunteers shared a vision of what our community can achieve by working together, a structure that facilitates cooperation, and support that will allow all to do our work in order to produce significant results. Volunteers provide leadership in this community. Volunteers are committed to help meet the challenges by continuing to gather evidence about the needs for Archuleta County and provide the support and assistance for community capacity building.

I wish to thank the 80 volunteers who gave their time, energy, and perspectives through their attendance, Tim Walsworth, CEO of United Way of Southwest Colorado for arranging the forum, Dr. Janet Mickish for conducting the forum, the elected and appointed city and county officials who attended and listened, Colorado Cowboy Catering and The Floured Apron for providing our lunch, Pagosa Springs Rotary Club for switching their meeting, and the Pagosa Chamber of Commerce for helping publicize the event. If I have missed a thank you, please pat yourself on the back, as Archuleta County needs people like you with an open heart who will achieve a better, more caring community in southwest Colorado. Thank you.

The needs assessment will be publicized online at www.colorado.gov/GCCS. Dr. Janet Mickish, coordinator, Community Planning and Volunteer Service Initiative, can be contacted at (303) 866-6408 or Janet.Mickish@state.co.us for additional feedback.

Karen Davison

United Way Archuleta County

County fair

Dear Editor:

I want to comment on the 2008 version of the Archuleta County Fair. A million thanks to the volunteers who put this thing together. It was smaller this year and to me that meant more quality. I really missed the “demolition derby” and the dunking booths on Saturday, but so enjoyed watching the huge crowd appear for the barbecue dinner. Then we had the 4-H animal auction and that is where the community shines. What excitement for these young people. The dance was great fun. We also enjoyed the Southwest Land Alliance breakfast and the chili cook-off.

Thanks for it all.

Cindy Gustafson

Volunteers

Dear Editor:

Did you have fun at the fair? If so, thank a neighbor or friend for volunteering. People don’t realize that in our area of responsibility to gather volunteers, it takes 150 people. We were able to get 87 and they worked really hard to fill in all the time slots needed. Most of the people you see working at the fair are volunteers. Our area of responsibility was the parking shuttle, entry gate, info booth, kids train, a roamer fix-it person, exhibit hall and office helpers. Diane and I would like to thank all of you for making this fair fun. Want a derby next year? Here’s the answer — be a volunteer. Or, want to help in any other area, we will have signs up again next year to remind everyone of the need for your help. Thank you volunteers, we really appreciate all of you.

Mona Hughes and Diane Kleinman

Obliging

Dear Editor:

I concur with Mr. Al Crump of Rockwall, Texas, whose letter appeared Aug. 7, commending Mrs. Gloria Macht for her professionalism as dispatcher. It is always a relief when I hear her obliging, patrician voice on the horn, because my request for help will not be impugned.

Sincerely,

Arlene Marcus

Engineer mind

Dear Editor:

Reference Pagosa SUN, Aug. 7, County Commissioner Bob Moomaw’s letter to the editor.

I question a public official’s competence writing a letter of such unethical and unprofessional status. I am appalled that a commissioner can lower oneself and yet is to represent the citizens of Archuleta County. His letter is petty and jealous.

Folks, yes research if you need to, Robin Schiro’s education. She is coming from an engineer mind, which she continues to ask relevant questions. A few community leaders do not like being questioned, it appears to be more of the thinking, follow the leader.

Thank you,

Pam Morrow


Miller

Thanks, Pagosa. Without your prayers, cards, and good wishes, I never would have made it through my recent illness. True friends are priceless, and I cherish every one of you. I am in a rehab center now, and hope to be going home soon! Thank you again for your love and caring.

Helen Miller

Fun in the Sun

Whoops; Thank you, part 2, for the Pagosa Fun in the Sun extended school year program. I neglected to mention Sonic for giving us a break on yummy shakes on a really hot day.  Also, a horse-sized thank you to Aurora Wright who put on her cowgirl hat and graciously opened her stable to our students. They got a chance to groom the horses and practice sitting in a saddle. Thank you very much and sorry for the oversight.

Kelley Simonson

ESY coordinator/teacher

Kids rodeo

On behalf of the Archuleta County Fair Board, the rodeo managers and all the participants, we’d like to say thank you to all our sponsors that helped make this event possible: A&M Construction and Excavation; Hard Times Concrete; Trapper Creek Outfitters; Boot Hill Tack/Feed; Wapiti Company Outfitters; Day Lumber; Wolf Creek Outfitters; the Junction Restaurant; Summit Transport; Sundown Outfitters; Mountain View Mini Storage; V.L. Trim; Jim Davis Drywall; Aspen Springs Bar/Grill; and Alpine Lakes Ranch Development.

Thank you to Busted Spur Rodeo Company, and all the great volunteers that gave their time and effort. The rodeo was a huge success.

Shonna Snow

Chamber Business Bites are back next Tuesday

Porpoises take fifth at state swim meet

Led by Emily Bryant’s nine first-place finishes, the Pagosa Lakes Porpoises took fifth out of 24 teams at the recently completed Colorado State Seasonal Swimming Championships in Cortez.

The Pagosa team had its best finish in 15 years (880 points) behind teams from Colorado Springs, Fort Collins and Salida. Valley Swim Team of Colorado Springs finished first with 2,475 points.

Bryant won nine events and finished in the top eight in three others, winning the 11-12 girls age group title.

Pagosa sent 16 Porpoises (21 qualified) to compete in the state meet, with swimmers from ages 6 to 19.

The 8 and unders kicked things off Friday with the boys’ medley relay team of Joey Berndt, Michael Brown, Trevor Bryant and R.J. Hernandez finishing second. Berndt, Brown, Hernandez and Conner Aragon teamed up to win the freestyle relay. Bryant led the 8 and under boys from Pagosa with a third, fourth, fifth, sixth and eighth place finishes in his individual events. All five boys finished in the top eight in at least one event. On the girls’ side, Erin Monkiewicz was the lone representative. Erin finished with four top-eight finishes and at the age of 6 has two more years in her age group.

In the 9-10 boys, James Berndt lead the way with a second place in the 50 fly and three third-place finishes. Also contributing was Blake Irons with three top-eight finishes. Both boys teamed with Devan Monkiewicz and Kyle Mundy to place fourth in the 200 medley relay. Berndt and Irons combined with Trevor Bryant and Monkiewicz to finish second in the freestyle relay. Monkiewicz also swam five individual events during the three-day meet.

The most intriguing event was the girls’ 15 and over relays (both free and medley) combining Emily Bryant (12), Braden Higby (10), Erica Pitcher (14) and Samara Hernandez (15). The girls had to swim in the age group with the oldest swimmer and still managed to come away with two seventh-place finishes.

Pitcher’s achievements were not limited to relays. She also took first place in the 50 and 100 freestyle, and 100 and 200 butterfly, and finished in the top three in the 200 freestyle and 400 IM.

“Erica had her best meet of the season. Swimming the hardest events with very little rest, Erica came into her own at this meet,” said Pagosa head coach Steve Williams.

“Our swimmers have been willing to make the time, effort and sacrifice it takes to be among the best, and in some cases, the very best, in Colorado,” said Williams. “They’ve been able to mix hard work and fun throughout the season and that leads to outstanding results.”

Pagosa swimmers who also placed:

• Austin Miller: 100 and 200 butterfly, 100 and 200 back, 200 and 400 IM, 200 breaststroke, 200, 400 and 1,500 free.

• Dane Murdock: 100 and 200 fly, 100 and 200 breaststroke, 200 and 400 IM, 100 back, 50,100 and 200 free.

• Aaron Miller: 50,100, 200 and 400 free, 100 and 200 breaststroke, 200 back, 200 and 400 IM. Miller finished first in four events in his last meet with Pagosa.

• Samara Hernandez: placed in the 50,100 and 200 frees, 100 and 200 breaststroke, 100 and 200 back, 200 and 400 IM.

• Braden Higby: 400 freestyle and 400 medley relays.

• Mitchell Higby: 400 freestyle and 400 medley relays.

Following the end of summer season, Porpoise coach Steve Williams was named 2008 Colorado Seasonal Coach of the Year.

Pagosa has approximately 40 swimmers over the course of the year with about 20 in the water at one time or another during the season. Williams and Marky Egan are its coaches. The team practices year-round and has at least seven swimmers competing for Durango High School this year. The team starts practice again Sept. 16.

Pagosa draws athletes from the entire Archuleta County area. More information on the club can be found at the Web site www.pagosaswim.com.


The real thing, at the Ranch Rodeo

The Western Heritage Event Center announces its third annual Western Heritage Ranch Rodeo, Sept. 6.

Ranchers from around Archuleta County will compete in this one-day event at the Red Ryder Rodeo grounds in Pagosa Springs starting at 5 p.m.

Local teams will compete in the events of horse catching, calf branding, team penning, team doctoring and wild cow milking.

Ranch rodeo is an event that was re-created a number of years ago to return to the roots of rodeo when the first event was established in 1882. The competition shows off the skills of ranch hands and horses, and is designed to accentuate the ranching heritage of yesterday and today. Ranch rodeos have gradually sprung up around the United States, and the events simulate what the ranch cowboy does for work each day on the ranch.

“These rodeos are a gathering of ranch families and have become a social function that is more than just competition,” says Erica Valdez, coordinator of this year’s rodeo. “Ranch rodeos showcase more than just the skills of each individual cowboy, but rather the team concept of ‘riding for the brand,’” she adds.

For information regarding this event, contact Erica Valdez at (575) 202-9547.


Pagosa golfers compete at South Fork, Santa Fe

Pagosans competed in the Northern New Mexico Senior Men’s Golf Association tournament in South Fork Aug. 5 and 6.

Winning local golfers Aug. 5 were: Championship Flight, First Net, Bruce Sandvik (67); Second Gross, Malcolm Rodger (78). First Flight, Second Gross, Bob Oliver (83). Second Flight, Second Gross, Jack Hummel (92); Fourth Net, Jim Fluharty (74). Third Flight, First Gross, Ken Bailey (90).

On Aug. 6, the winners included the following: First Flight, First Net, Roger Betts (63); Second Gross, Hugh Bundy (81). Second Flight, Fourth Net, Jack Hummel (73). Third Flight, First Gross, Ken Bailey (93). Closest to the Pin on Hole No. 6 went to Roger Betts.

The next NNMSMGA tournaments will be held at the San Fe Country Club Aug. 18 and 19.


Kids Rodeo winners announced

The winners of the 2008 Archuleta County Fair Kids Rodeo were:

First place, Mutton Busting: Trevor Torrez.

First place, Calf Riding: Dalton Lucero. In second was Preston Lucero.

First place, Steer Riding: Tyreese Tyndall; second place, Stetson Ruthardt.

First place, Cow Riding: Waylon Lucero. Second place went to Hunter Williams.

In Chute Dogging (14-16), first place went to Cheyann Dixon, and second to Hunter Williams

In the 17-19 age group, first went to Billy Kolz, and second to Landon Bayger.

In Barrel Racing (6-10), first place went to Lane Schaaf, and second went to McKenna Deyapp; in 11-13, first place went to Caylin Chumley, and second to Kendra Schlom; and in 14-19, the first place winner was Hailey Archuleta, and second was Kelsi Lucero.

In Pole Bending (6-10), first place went to Karrington Castro, and second to Lane Schaaf; in 11-13, first went to Morgan Schaaf, and second to Kendra Schlom; and in 14-19, first place went to Kelsi Lucero, and second place to Cody Snow.

In the Hitchhiking Race, first place winners were Alexandra Herrera and Breann Decker; and in second place were Hailey Archuleta and Breann Decker.

First place in the 7-10 Ribbon Race was won by Maddie Story and Cade Chumley; first place in the 11-13 age group went to Morgan Schaaf and Payton Shahan, and second place to Caylin Chumley and Cade Chumley.

First place winners in the Team Roping were Austin Evans and Cheyann Dixon, and second place went to Waylon Lucero and Hunter Williams.

In Breakaway Roping, first place went to Cade Chumley, second to Caylin Chumley.

The winners in the Family Ribbon Roping were Cade and Brandon Chumley, and in second were Payton and Dwayne Shahan.

The Jackpot winners in the Steer-Hide Drag were Payton and Dwayne Shahan. In second place were Stetson and Raymond Ruthardt.

Skateboard competition
Sunday at South Pagosa Park

The Pagosa Springs Skaters Coalition for Concrete will hold its third annual skateboard competition Aug. 17 at South Pagosa Park on South 8th Street in downtown Pagosa Springs.

All proceeds from the event will go toward the construction of a new skateboard park. The Town of Pagosa Springs has agreed to match funds raised by the community and to assist with site selection.

This year’s contest will feature a street skate and mini-ramp competition, in addition to a game of S.K.A.T.E. All winners will receive prizes.

The contest will also feature a live DJ, food, refreshments, and a raffle with a huge assortment of goods to suit everyone.

The entry fee is $10 for all competing skaters, or $15 for two events. Admission is free for spectators. Sign-ups are from 8 to 9:30 a.m., and the contest begins at 10 a.m.


Open house for proposed Colorado Roadless Rule and Draft Environmental Impact Statement

The U.S. Forest Service and the State of Colorado will host a public open house on the proposed Colorado Roadless Rule and associated Draft Environmental Impact Statement (DEIS) from 5 to 8:30 p.m. Wednesday, Aug. 20, at the Fort Lewis College Ballroom, 1000 Rim Drive, Durango.

The Durango open house is one of eight scheduled across Colorado.

The rule and DEIS address roadless-area management on National Forest lands in the state of Colorado. The event is not a public hearing, but will be held in an open house format to give people the opportunity to better understand the proposed rule and accompanying DEIS. Interested persons can come anytime during the evening to view materials explaining the proposed rule and DEIS, speak with specialists one-on-one, and provide written comments.

The public has 90 days, beginning July 25, 2008, to comment on the proposed Colorado Roadless Rule. The DEIS comment period began with the Federal Register Notice of Availability on Aug. 1, 2008. Both comment periods will end Oct. 23, 2008.

Information on the Colorado Roadless Rule and the public meeting schedule is available at http://roadless.fs.fed.us/colorado.shtml.

Citizens with specific questions should call the Roadless Rule information line at (303) 275-5567.

Public comments on the proposed rule and DEIS are due by Oct. 23, 2008, and may be sent via e-mail to COcomments@fsroadless.org.

Comments can also be mailed to Roadless Area Conservation-Colorado, P.O Box 162909, Sacramento, CA 95816-2909 or faxed to (916) 456-6724.


Pony Up Month activities to benefit Spring Creek Wild Horse herd

Horse lovers in southwest Colorado can help the Spring Creek Wild Horse herd of Disappointment Valley by participating in the many western-themed Pony Up Month activities sponsored by the San Juan Mountains Association in Durango during the month of August.

The main event will be held the evening of Tuesday, Aug. 19, at the Durango Arts Center. A public reception at 6 p.m. will be followed at 6:30 by celebrated Colorado photographer Claude Steelman’s slideshow presentation of photographs from his recently published book, “Colorado’s Wild Horses.” A book signing and silent auction will follow, with proceeds from beer sales donated to the effort by Steamworks Brewing Company. Tickets for the evening are $10 for SJMA members, and $15 for nonmembers. Tickets are on sale at the Forest Service/BLM offices in Pagosa Springs, or online at sjma.org.

Pony Up Month is designed to raise money for and increase public awareness of wild horses in Colorado, particularly the Spring Creek Herd in Disappointment Valley, northwest of Cortez. Proceeds will be used to assist the Bureau of Land Management with improving habitat to help enhance and sustain the Spring Creek herd, supporting work efforts by volunteers, and increasing public awareness of these symbols of western heritage.

The 22,000-acre Spring Creek Herd Management Area is managed by the BLM to support 35 to 65 horses in a sustainable manner. A newly formed group called the Disappointment Wild Bunch Partners includes SJMA, the National Mustang Association, and the Mesa Verde and Four Corners Back Country Horsemen groups. Over the years, volunteers from these groups have assisted the BLM on a variety of tasks, including fencing repairs and installation, tamarisk removal near water sources, water feature construction, population counts, habitat improvements, and efforts to increase public awareness of the herd and its needs.

For more information, contact Kathe Hayes, SJMA volunteer coordinator, at 385-1310.


Hunter education set for Aug. 28-29

A hunter education class will be conducted Aug. 28 and 29 from 6 to 10 p.m. Thursday, and 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Friday.

Students must attend Thursday and Friday. Students wanting to attend just the Friday session will not be admitted.

The class will be held at the Pagosa Springs Community Center, South Conference Room. Cost is $10 per student.

This course will be open to anyone wishing to obtain a hunter safety card. If you were born on or after Jan. 1, 1949, you are required to have a hunter safety card before you can purchase a hunting license.

All programs, services and activities of the Colorado Division of Wildlife are operated in compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act. If you need accommodation due to a disability, contact Doug Purcell, Mike Reid or James Romero at 264-2131, or Don Volger at 264-4151, Ext. 239. To assure that the Division of Wildlife can meet your needs, please notify Doug, Mike, James or Don at least seven days before the class.

This course is sponsored by the Pagosa Springs Police Department in conjunction with the Colorado Division of Wildlife.


Audubon trains for youth ed program

Teach children about nature.

Audubon Colorado is seeking volunteers to lead Pagosa Springs Elementary School students in outdoor education programs this September.

No prior teaching experience necessary — just a love of children and the outdoors. Free training provided: Wednesday, Sept. 3, from 4-7 p.m.; Friday, Sept. 5, and Saturday, Sept. 6, from 8:30 a.m.-4 p.m.

Advance registration, attendance at all training sessions, and a background check are required to participate and be certified as a Volunteer Educator.

Training and education programs are held at Jake and Terry Hershey’s Four Mile Ranch on Snowball Road.

For more information or to register, contact Becky Gillette, Southwest Regional Director for Audubon Colorado at (970) 883-3066 or rgillette@audubon.org.

Chimney Rock Full Moon Program Saturday

The Chimney Rock Full Moon Program is set for Saturday, Aug. 16.

Watch the full moon rise over the mesa top Great House site and learn about the Ancestral Puebloans, archaeoastronomy theories  and area geology. The program is approximately two to three hours in length and is not recommended for children under 12.  Reservations are required and tickets are $15. 

Gates open 6:30 to 7 p.m. and the program will start at approximately 7:30. Moon rise will occur at 7:57.  Add $5 and come a little earlier for the Great Kiva Trail Loop which starts at 5:30.  Bring flashlights, water, cushions, and blankets or coats. 

This event is sponsored by the Chimney Rock Interpretive Association in partnership with the USDA Forest Service, Pagosa Ranger District.  For reservations, call the visitor cabin at 883-5359 from 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. daily.  Please note: cancellation can be made no later than today, Aug. 14.  Visit our Web site at www.chimneyrockco.org.


Sky Watch

Seven planets visible in the night sky

The following sun and moon data for Aug. 14, 2008 is provided by the United States Naval Observatory.

Sunrise: 6:24 a.m.

Sunset: 8:01 p.m.

Moonrise: 6:58 p.m.

Moonset: 5:03 a.m. Aug. 15.

Moon phase: The moon is waxing gibbous with 95 percent of the visible disk illuminated. The moon is full Aug. 16 at 3:17 p.m. Mountain Daylight Time.

Savvy skywatchers with high quality binoculars or telescopes, and backyard stargazers who enjoy cosmic challenges, have an opportunity tonight, and through the remainder of the week, to observe seven planets as they travel across our night sky.

Those intent on attempting the planetary pursuit should begin observations tonight by facing west about 30 minutes after sunset. There, sunk low in the horizon, skywatchers will find a tight grouping of the first three planets on the seven planet tour — Mercury, Saturn and Venus.

Saturn, at magnitude 0.8 shines a creamy yellow, and hovers in the middle of the triple grouping. With Saturn located, stargazers can then shift their gaze two degrees below and to the right of Saturn to locate Mercury, then two degrees above and to the left of Saturn to locate Venus. Two degrees is roughly equal to two fingertips held at arm’s length with the night sky as a backdrop.

To the naked eye, Mercury and Venus will appear as brilliant blue-white, star-like objects. However, because the sky will not be completely dark, and because the light reflected off of Mercury and Venus is refracted through Earth’s atmospheric haze, stargazers may find both objects, particularly Mercury, easier to locate with binoculars. Unfortunately, and depending on the flatness of the viewer’s western horizon, Mercury hovers so low in the sky it may not be visible at all.

Local topographic issues may mean views of Venus and Mercury aren’t guaranteed; however, the next planet on the tour — Mars — hovers well above the horizon and should be easy to locate. Mars, with its signature ruddy orange color, will be found about 10 degrees from Saturn and about 14 degrees above the horizon. Ten degrees is about equal to a fist held at arm’s length with the night sky as a backdrop.

After locating Mars, Jupiter — the largest planet in our solar system — is the next stop on the journey. To locate Jupiter, stargazers should shift their gaze upward and to the south where they will find the gas giant planet blazing a brilliant yellowish white. Jupiter has dominated our southern sky for a number of weeks, and it’s Great Red Spot, and four of its 63 catalogued moons — Ganymede, Io, Callisto and Europa — are well within the reach of backyard observers equipped with quality telescopes.

Jupiter and the previously mentioned planets are fairly common sights in our night sky. Thus, locating them marks the end of the easy part of the seven planet tour and the beginning of the challenging portion of the journey.

In order to view the next two planets — Neptune and Uranus — stargazers will need quality optical aid, perhaps a star chart, and the resolve to wait until 1 a.m when the planets are highest in our night sky.

Following the imaginary line that links Jupiter and Mars (the ecliptic), to a point due south, stargazers should scan for a tiny, faint, bluish green object which is the planet Neptune. Tenacious stargazers stand a fair chance of locating the mysterious planet, as Neptune is at its closest and brightest to Earth tonight and through the weekend. Nevertheless, don’t expect Neptune to leap out at you — even at its closest, Neptune orbits at a distant, 2.7 billion miles away.

In order to locate Uranus, the last planet on the celestial shopping list, stargazers will first need to successfully locate Neptune. The reason is because Uranus is almost the same distance to the left of Neptune as Jupiter is to Neptune’s right. Thus, the distance between Jupiter and Neptune provides a useful measuring stick to help stargazers locate Uranus. Uranus, like Neptune, appears a faint bluish green, and neither planet is visible with the naked eye.

With the full moon fast approaching, stargazers may find it difficult to locate all the planets. However an unobstructed view of the western horizon, a star chart and optical aid will help stargazers successfully complete the seven-planet roundup.


Pirate football starts with three on the road

The Pagosa Springs Pirates began football practice Monday afternoon and twice-a-day practices on Tuesday, in preparation for the opening game at Bayfield at 7 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 23. The game will not count as a conference game.

The Pirates begin the season with seven returning starters on offense and six returnees on defense.

The Pirates lost two of three veterans at linebacker positions. Sackett Ross is the only returning linebacker.

Four offensive linemen graduated from the 2007 team.

Three former Buccaneer football players will assist head coach Sean O’Donnell this season. They include Jeremy Caler, Bryan Looper and Jordan Shaffer. Two other assistant coaches are Dave Close and Mike Malano.

O’Donnell is still looking for one more assistant coach.

A turnout of 58 players are attending practice for the varsity and junior varsity, about the same number of athletes as in 2007. There was a summer football camp, July 14-25, to prep for the 2008 season.

The morning practices this week have begun at 6 a.m. and lasted until 8:30. The afternoon drills have begun at 3:30 p.m. and lasted until 8 p.m. every day except today, when there will be a mandatory parents meeting.

The twice-a-day practices will continue through Thursday of next week. There is no Sunday practice. The players wore pads on Wednesday of this week and were to start hitting today.

Both starters at quarterback from the 2007 team have returned. They showed strong promise last year, passing and rushing.

The Pirates have announced a 2008 football schedule which shows two games against Bayfield, one away and one at home.

Last year in the regular season, the Pirates played at Bayfield and lost in the closing minutes, after leading most of the game.

This year, the Pirates open the season at Bayfield on Aug. 23 in the non-conference game.

Up next are two other road games: Aug. 29 at Alamosa, and Sept. 5 at Cortez.

Most games begin at 7 p.m., with the exception of the game in Alamosa, which is set for 4 p.m. on a Friday.

The conference games for the Pirates this year are at Monte Vista on Sept. 19, at Salida on Sept. 26, at home versus Buena Vista on Oct. 3, at home against Centauri on Oct. 24, and at home versus Bayfield on Oct. 31.

Other non-conference games this year are Del Norte, at home on Sept. 12, and Delta, at home, on Oct. 17.

Youth soccer assessments next week

Soccer registration has closed and rosters for the 5-6 and 7-8 divisions will be finalized by early next week.

The season will begin after Labor Day and run through early October.

Games will be played Monday-Thursday. There will be no games scheduled on Saturdays unless absolutely needed in order to make up rain-out dates.

Games for the 5-6 and 7-8 divisions have been tentatively scheduled for Mondays and Wednesdays, while the 9-10 and 11-12 divisions will play Tuesdays and Thursdays.

However, soccer officials in Dulce, N.M. are evaluating the possibility of bringing their teams up once per week, so there is a chance the schedules will be adjusted accordingly. In any case, all games will be scheduled to start after 5 p.m.

Parents and coaches are reminded that player assessment day for the 9-10 and 11-12 youth soccer divisions is Tuesday, Aug. 19, at Pagosa Springs Elementary School.

The 9-10 assessment will begin at 5:20 p.m. and run until 6:30; the 11-12 assessment will begin at 6:45 and last about an hour. All players and coaches in these divisions should attend.

The draft for the 9-10 and 11-12 divisions will be Wednesday, Aug. 20, 6 p.m. at Town Hall. All head coaches in these divisions should attend.

This year’s cleat swap will also be held Tuesday, Aug. 19, at the elementary school and will begin at 5:30 p.m. There will be an area adjacent to the fields designated for donation and trade of socks, cleats and shin guards for all age divisions.

The cleat swap is a free event; all players and parents who are registering for this year’s leagues are welcome to attend.

Coaches and team sponsors for each division are still needed; cost for sponsorship is $150, which includes sponsor’s name on team uniforms, commemorative plaque with team picture and designation in media articles.

The recreation department would also like to hear from individuals interested in officiating this year’s soccer leagues. Pay ranges from $12-$15 per game, depending on experience. If interested please contact the recreation office at 264-4151, Ext. 231 or 232.

Youth tennis canceled

Due to lack of participation, the third session of youth tennis has been canceled.

For more information regarding this cancellation, contact the recreation office at 264-4151, Ext. 231.

Youth baseball photos

Parents and coaches who ordered youth baseball photos this year can stop by Pagosa Photography at 480 San Juan St. or contact Jeff Laydon in the studio at 264-3686 to arrange pick-up of orders.

The recreation office will supply this year’s sponsors with plaques and team pictures as soon as they become available.

Sports hotline

General information concerning the Pagosa Springs Recreation Department can be obtained by calling the Pagosa Springs Sports Hotline at 264-4151, Ext. 301, or logging on to townofpagosasprings.com and going to the parks and recreation link.

All schedules and upcoming events are updated on a weekly basis.

If you have questions or concerns, or need additional information about any of the Pagosa Springs Recreation Department adult or youth sports programs, call 264-4151, Ext. 231 or 232.


Date High Low Type Depth Moisture
8/6 78 54 R - .16"
8/7 77 53 R - .04"
8/8 75 55 R - .17"
8/9 75 52 R - .16"
8/10 76 50 R - .35"
8/11 81 46 - - -
8/12 82 45 - - -


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