Thursday, March 29, 2007

County takes hard look at reservoir plan

By James Robinson
Staff Writer

As the San Juan Water Conservancy District works to finalize a multi-million dollar land purchase that will later become home for the proposed Dry Gulch Reservoir, the Archuleta County Board of County Commissioners has issued a request for proposals asking for an independent review of a Harris Water Engineering Inc. report that, in part, justifies the 35,000 acre-foot reservoir and addresses the area’s future water needs.

Harris Water Engineering is the water district’s engineering consultant.

The move to authorize the request for proposals came during a March 20, board of county commissioners meeting, and the commissioners’ push for the independent review stems from three points of concern: Is a 35,000 acre-foot reservoir a priority? Secondly, considering that water will have to be pumped up out of the San Juan River and to the reservoir site, is Dry Gulch the most cost-effective location and is the engineering that supports the site’s viability sound? And third, should the county impose impact fees on new development, per a SJWCD and Pagosa Area Water and Sanitation District request, in order to help pay for a water storage project as large as Dry Gulch Reservoir?

Although the SJWCD is spearheading the land purchase, Dry Gulch is a joint SJWCD-PAWSD project.

Archuleta County Administrator Bob Campbell said the county isn’t necessarily opposed to levying impact fees, but he questions forcing residents to pay for water storage needs 50 to 100 years in the future when the county faces other, arguably more pressing financial issues such as roads, infrastructure, law enforcement and facilities.

“Studies say we need 12,000 acre-feet in 2040, but we’re not sure we should make today’s taxpayers pay for water development much beyond that. Besides, we feel there may be other smaller alternatives to look at,” Campbell said.

The Dry Gulch Reservoir site is located about two miles northeast of Pagosa Springs and south of U.S. 160, near the Weber Sand & Gravel facility. As currently designed, and at full buildout, the reservoir could accommodate 35,300 acre-feet of water storage, including the district’s existing right to 6,300 acre feet. Included in the plans are a dam 3,000 feet long and 160 feet high and a lift station required to move water from the river to the reservoir. Upon completion, the reservoir’s total surface area at high water line will be roughly 621 acres. Total cost estimates have approached $140 million.

San Juan Water Conservation District Board President Fred Schmidt said although the Dry Gulch site could ultimately accommodate a 35,300 acre-foot reservoir, land acquisition doesn’t automatically guarantee construction of a reservoir that size. Schmidt said acquisition of the Dry Gulch site allows room to meet water storage goals for 2040 with space for future expansion to the 35,000 acre size depending on funding and need. Schmidt added that the project will most likely be built in phases.

According to the SJWCD Web site, PAWSD currently has 2,900 acre feet of water storage in its system, and will have 4,000 acre-feet with the completion of the Stevens Reservoir expansion due sometime next summer.

Harris studies indicate that by 2043, the district will require a total of 12,000 acre-feet. Thus, the district has a storage shortfall of 8,000 acre feet. According to district representatives, the first phase could result in an impoundment of 12,000 acre feet, while later Dry Gulch expansion could be undertaken as funding and needs allow.

“The size of the reservoir in 20 years will be decided on need and economic ability,” Schmidt said.

Schmidt said grant funding will play a major role in the success of the project, and that the district recently received tentative approval on a $1 million grant, plus access to a low interest, state-sponsored loan program that could save the district $4 to $5 million in interest over the next 20 to 25 years.

Schmidt said the grant award for land acquisition was virtually unprecedented and represented a tectonic philosophical shift in the state’s approach to solving long term water needs.

“To me, this (the grant award) is very unique and shows that after their staff has gone through all our studies, they see the need and importance of such a long term project for our economic well being,” Schmidt said.

And with escalating land prices, and development gobbling up suitable sites, Schmidt said the risks of not having storage capacity in the future are far too great.

“If we want to buy the land can we afford it? And second, will it even be available?” Schmidt said.

And once property not purchased now becomes lakefront property, per-acre prices could skyrocket, putting future purchases well out of the district’s reach.

Both PAWSD manager Carrie Weiss and Schmidt said neither they, nor their respective board members, have a personal business interest in property near the proposed reservoir. And Schmidt added that he does not know anyone with an interest in property near the Dry Gulch site.

Schmidt explained that the district began the project 14 years ago with 13 possible reservoir sites. After two years and site analyses, the district whittled those options down three. According to Schmidt, a developer beat the district to the punch on their first choice, and purchased the property before the district could do so. The property went for $800 an acre. The third option was not cost effective due to distance from PAWSD infrastructure, thus Dry Gulch came out on top due to its proximity to the San Juan River, town and existing water lines.

According to Schmidt, the Dry Gulch property will sell for more than $10,000 an acre, and that, according to Schmidt, is evidence that waiting any longer could make water storage cost prohibitive.

“Is it prudent to buy the land we need now? Yes it is,” Schmidt said.

Schmidt said negotiations on the sale of the Dry Gulch property are complete, and he anticipates the signing of the sales contract to occur in mid-April. Until the contract is finalized, Schmidt said he was unwilling to disclose the sales amount.

When asked about the appraised value, Schmidt said an updated appraisal was due out in 45 to 60 days.

Schmidt and Weiss said both districts have an open-door policy and have been willing to meet with the county to answer questions and to address their concerns. Weiss and Schmidt said that during the last two years, the county has not taken that opportunity, and both see the request for proposals as an expensive duplication of work already done.

Archuleta County Commissioner Bob Moomaw will soon take a seat on the conservancy district board, a move that Schmidt and Weiss supported.

Schmidt said he hopes the conservancy district board and the BoCC can sit down to discuss impact fees, site locations, engineering and future water needs before the county spends money on an independent review.

And Weiss added, “We welcome whatever reviews they want to do, but we have information here. I believe that whatever studies they go through will just reaffirm what our consultants have already established.”

According to Campbell, in addition to reviewing the Harris Water Engineering Inc. report, the independent engineering firm will also review PAWSD’s operational policies, and its rate and fee structure to determine if they are the best practices and in the best interest of the community.

Campbell said PAWSD’s policies and fee structure are of particular interest to the county as it moves forward with building new facilities. Campbell said $700,000 of the cost of the $22 million courthouse campus project will result from PAWSD related fees.

Staff writer Chuck McGuire contributed to this story.



Budget change considered for Dry Gulch purchase

By Chuck McGuire
Staff Writer

The San Juan Water Conservancy District Board of Directors will consider a resolution to amend the district’s 2007 budget at its regular monthly meeting Monday, April 9.

The amendment, if passed, will increase both lease/purchase proceeds and total expenditures, by approximately $7.2 million.

According to director Carrie Weiss, the amendment is necessary to accommodate the purchase of property for the proposed Dry Gulch Reservoir outside of town. Though the district has no official agreement to purchase the real estate just yet, it has entered into a Memorandum of Understanding with the landowners for the eventual acquisition of roughly 600 acres. Weiss said the official multi-million dollar contract could come as early as the April 9 meeting.

In the amended version of the district’s current budget, the revenue side reflects three primary changes — one negative and two positive.

The negative change indicates a $270,000 reduction in anticipated revenues from impact fees, in part because Archuleta County has been slow to enact them on new construction under county jurisdiction.

Additionally, Weiss said, while the town has imposed impact fees, it has not been assessing them against commercial construction, resulting in further decreases.

Two revenue increases indicate $7.2 million from lease/purchase proceeds and nearly $300,000 in the form of a transfer from the district’s reserve fund.

Lease/purchase proceeds are described as monies obtained through grants and loans for the purpose of pursuing “capital projects,” such as the purchase of land.

As one would expect, on the expenses side of the budget, capital projects increased the most, while smaller line items rose or fell proportionately, resulting in a balanced 2007 budget.

Until the district’s April 9 meeting, a copy of the proposed amended budget has been filed and is open for public scrutiny at the district offices at 100 Lyn Ave., Pagosa Springs. Any elector within the district may, at any time prior to the final adoption of the Resolution to Amend the 2007 Budget, review and register any objections thereto.

The April 9 meeting will take place at the district offices and is open to the public. The public portion is scheduled to begin at 9:15 a.m.




New report clarifies town tap limits

By James Robinson
Staff Writer

Scheduled modifications at the town’s sewage treatment plant will give elected officials more latitude than previously expected in approving development proposals, according to an updated engineering report released March 13.

In a memorandum to Town Manager Mark Garcia, Mark Dahm of Briliam Engineering concludes that, with the installation of state-approved aeration equipment, the facility could handle another 175 to 250 additional taps.

A preliminary Briliam assessment released earlier in the month put the number at roughly 100, a figure which caused town council-member concern during a March 8 meeting after the council approved 375 new units at various stages in the planning cue.

The modifications, due for installation before April 15, are part of an effort to keep the town plant in the state’s good graces following a number of intake, or “organic loading,” violations during 2005 and 2006.

Organic loading is a term engineers and waste water treatment professionals use to describe sewage intake at a treatment plant during the course of a day. Organic loading is measured in BODs.

According to the town’s state issued permit, when organic loading broaches certain thresholds, as dictated by a measurement of plant capacity, it triggers either planning for a new facility, or construction of a new facility. During 2005 and 2006, organic loading exceeded state-mandated limits and activated both triggers.

As part of the town’s agreement with the state, the added aeration equipment will enable the plant to accommodate a higher organic loading limit, and will keep the plant in compliance until a new waste water treatment facility comes on line in December 2008.

In the meantime, and according to town documents, there are roughly 900 units in varying stages of the planning cue with 20 completed and builders having obtained building permits for at least 54 units.

Although unit numbers alone may appear to bode ill for the current plant, Garcia said he anticipates the new plant will be fully operational well before some of the larger developments, such as the 218-unit Dakota Springs and the 119-unit Pradera Pointe, require connection to the system.

“We still have some time,” Garcia said.


james@pagosasun.com

Chimney Rock Interpretive Association to hold open house

The Chimney Rock Interpretive Association (CRIA) is a volunteer organization that helps the Forest Service maintain the Chimney Rock Archeological Area and provides guided tours at that site. CRIA operates under a special use permit from the USFS but receives no funding from the Forest Service. It has been a stand-alone 501(c)3 non-profit organization for slightly over two years, having separated from the San Juan Mountains Association (SJMA) to take over these responsibilities. Many of the same people who were volunteers in the previous organization remained with CRIA and have been giving tours and working for the site for many years.

The Chimney Rock Interpretive Association is in the middle of an expansion, both in activities and the number of volunteers. “It is an exciting time for CRIA,” said Bob Henley, president of the board of trustees. “There is a lot of continuity stemming from our past association with SJMA, but many new things are going on to make CRIA even better. We are firmly on our feet now and are looking for new faces who would like to join us and help with our new activities.” To let people know more about us, we are holding an open house Saturday, April 7, at the community center.

One of the most sought after tickets CRIA has to offer are those for the Major Lunar Standstill, something that happens only a few times per year over a three-year period. Then, there is a 15 1/2- year time gap before this lunar event starts happening again. Viewers are taken up to the U. S. Forest Service fire tower to witness the moon’s rising between the twin towers. Tickets go on sale for this year’s MLS events on May 15, which is also opening day for guided tours. This is the last year the Major Lunar Standstill will take place for almost two decades. If you want to see this extraordinary event, better make it a point to call for tickets when they open up for sale.

Chimney Rock Interpretive Association and their volunteers are most noted for their daily guided tours. They give four tours a day from May 15 through Sept. 30 each year. This requires a volunteer staff of tour guides and cabin hosts. “We are actively recruiting new people for these positions right now,” said Tanice Ramsperger, and there are many behind-the-scenes positions for which we need new people as well. We are growing, and with some of our newly planned activities, we have lots of opportunities to get involved. If someone has an interest or skill, we’ll find a way to let them serve.” Maintenance personnel, sign painters, artists, office workers, article writers, proof readers, grant writers, marketing and people who like to work with children are all needed and welcome.

Speaking of children, one of the first activities each year is the Life at Chimney Rock that CRIA holds for school children from the surrounding area in early May, and then again in August for the public. This event features many demonstrations of Ancient Puebloan crafts and skills including pottery making, basket making, preparing Yucca plant leaves to make twine, rope, sandals and paint brushes, atlatl spear throwing and more.

This year, CRIA is planning to continue its popular Full Moon program, an upper trail program to watch the full moon rise over the beautiful San Juan Mountains. They are also planning a Night Sky program complete with knowledgeable astronomers and a complement of telescopes. The Night Sky program will be held monthly and will take place at Chimney Rock in the upper parking lot on nights when moonlight will be at a minimum so the stars can be easily seen. Watch for dates for this new event.

CRIA is also planning to bring a variety of speakers to Pagosa Springs to give talks on Ancient Puebloans and related topics. These talks are free to the public.

“In the past, we have required almost every volunteer to take three full days of classroom training in order to participate in any position,” said Henley. “This year, we will be paring our training down to only two days for tour guides and cabin hosts, the people who deal with the public at the site. Volunteers for other positions will be required to take less training at the beginning of the season and will pick up information on-the-job when working with experienced volunteers. We will be implementing a mentor program to aid in this ongoing training.”

Ramsperger pointed out that this year, CRIA plans to hold an orientation day Saturday, April 14, followed by one day of training Friday, April 27, and a half day April 28. “This will allow those people who work to attend training. Our weekend and night programs will allow those same people to volunteer in off-work hours. We want to make it easier for non-retired, local people to get involved.”

Some say that CRIA is as much a social organization as it is one that maintains Chimney Rock and gives the tours. Ann Sadler said, “When we first started coming to Pagosa Springs two yeas ago, we didn’t know anyone. We wanted to get involved in the community, and friends suggested we become CRIA volunteers. When we learned that CRIA held potluck dinners the third Thursday of every month, we thought that would be a great way to meet new people. So we attended a potluck, got involved and have made several close friends through this wonderful volunteer group. I serve in the office and my husband, Jerry, serves as a tour guide. We love the time we give working on special projects and at the site, and we wouldn’t miss a potluck.”

Sound like fun to you? For more information, call the CRIA office in downtown Pagosa Springs at 264-2278. And, remember to attend the open house Saturday, April 7, at the community center.

Applications due soon for Allard Capital Conference

U.S. Sen. Wayne Allard (R-Colo.) is accepting applications to the 10th annual Allard Capital Conference, to be held June 6-8 in Washington, D.C.

This year’s conference will be sponsored by the University of Colorado and Fort Lewis College.

Interested residents should submit an application by Friday, April 6.

“The Allard Capital Conference is a unique opportunity for Colorado residents to interact with our nation’s leaders in Washington, D.C. In an ever-changing political environment, the Capital Conference provides key insights into how our government works,” said Allard. “We have a packed lineup of high ranking government officials and political leaders from both parties that will provide a once in a lifetime opportunity.”

The Allard Capital Conference is open to 120 Colorado residents, who have previously ranged in age from 18 to 85 and have come from all walks of life. Applicants who are accepted will be notified in late April and will pay a $250 registration fee, which includes conference materials and several meals during the conference. Applications and more information can be found online at http://allard.senate.gov/acc.

Past speakers at the Allard Capital Conference have included cabinet secretaries, senators, congressmen, military leaders and political analysts, including former Federal Reserve Chairman Alan Greenspan, Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia and former Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff General Richard Myers.

“The conference offers an unprecedented opportunity for participants to hear and talk with national policy makers on issues facing our country and the world,” said University of Colorado president Hank Brown. “We hope many students and Coloradans take advantage of the experience to learn more about our government by interacting with leaders from all branches of government.”

Fort Lewis College President Brad Bartel said, “As Colorado’s public liberal arts college, we know the value of a conference whereby a diverse set of individuals come together to express different opinions, concepts, and possible solutions to our nation’s problems.”


County sets date for E-Cycling Event

By Sheila Berger
Special to The SUN

The Archuleta County Solid Waste Department will be conducting an E-Cycling Event this year at the Pagosa Springs Transfer Station, where computer and other electronic equipment that has reached the end of its useful life will be collected and responsibly recycled. The event will kick off National County Government Week in Archuleta County and coincide with Earth Day, April 21.

The E-Cycling event will take place 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Saturday, April 21, at the Pagosa Springs transfer station, at 2140 County Road 500 (Trujillo Road).

Residents, businesses and schools are invited to bring computer equipment, TVs and other electronics such as fax machines, cables, keyboards, ink jet cartridges, cell phones, CD players and Game Boys™. Charges for disposal range from no charge for small items to $15 for computer monitors and large TVs. For the disposal of large volumes or for more information, contact the Archuleta County Solid Waste Department at 264-0193.

According to the LA Times, between now and 2009, more than 550 million computers and analog TVs will be thrown away in the continental United States — in addition to all of our portable electronic toys. The toxicity of this material is no small matter. For example, computer monitors can contain up to eight pounds of lead! Recent data from the State of Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment indicates that other electronic equipment, such as CPUs, keyboards, mice, scanners, cell phones and VCRs, exceed the regulatory limits for heavy metals and should be managed as hazardous waste if sent for disposal. Hazardous materials in computers include mercury, arsenic, cadmium, chromium and silver. The EPA estimates that 75 percent of heavy metals found in municipal landfills are a result of electronics, which could in turn make their way into our water supply.

It is illegal for businesses, governments, and schools to dispose of computers in the landfill. Everyone is urged to refurbish or recycle them instead. When a computer is sent to a trustworthy vendor, it is disassembled for materials recovery — taken apart, with parts then sent to various places to be reused and recycled.  In addition, the Archuleta County contracted recycler exceeds Department of Defense standards for data destruction.

New Warriors in Archuleta County, members of the ManKind Project, www.mkp.org, invite everyone to an open house and interactive drama 6:30-8 p.m. Tuesday, April 17, at the Pagosa Springs Community Center.
All adults interested in adding clarity and congruency to their life, improving relationships, becoming a better parent, having more open/honest dialog with family, friends and community will benefit from this discussion. This free program sculpts a person’s stages of emotional development and how one can change one’s negative-harmful thoughts and behaviors.
ManKind Project is not affiliated with a religious organization and respects everyone’s beliefs regarding his or her higher power. MKP is a non-profit, multicultural, international organization whose mission is to empower men to live their life’s mission while in service to others. New Warriors live their lives owning their choices while striving to create a safe and compassionate world.
There are 40,000 New Warriors around the world from South Africa to New Zealand, Germany to Australia, Ireland and the U.K. to British Columbia, Canada. There are 60 New Warriors in southwest Colorado.
Women Within, www.womenwithin.org, a sister organization of MKP, will also be represented at this open house.
This program is open to all, regardless of religious beliefs or gender. Refreshments and a question and answer period will follow this interactive presentation.
Call Steve Sewell, 264-4816, or John and Cherlyn Gwin, 731-9666, with any questions.


Volunteers needed for home-delivery meal program

Are you looking for a way to volunteer some time to your community and make an immediate impact on someone’s life?

The Silver Foxes Den Senior Center has an opportunity for you to make new friends while you donate one lunch hour per week to the home delivered meal program for our senior citizens.

Applications are currently being accepted from individuals as well as businesses, churches and other organizations that would like to make a difference. All applicants must provide their own vehicle and be available for approximately one hour, once a week. We are also accepting applications for substitute drivers. A background check will be completed on all applicants.

Adopt a home-delivery route today and brighten the lives of a few senior citizens. For more information, contact Musetta at 264-2167.


LEGAL NOTICES

OPPORTUNITY TO COMMENT

USDA - Forest Service
San Juan National Forest
Pagosa Ranger District
ArchuletaCounty, Colorado
The Pagosa District is seeking public comment on a proposal to reduce hazardous fuels in the Stollstiemer/Chimney Rock area of the Pagosa Ranger District. The project area is located approximately 15 miles southwest of Pagosa Springs, Colorado. T34N (UTE) R4W Sections 8U, 9U, 15U, 16U, 17U, 18U, 19U, 20U, 21U. N.M.P.M.
A total of approximately 1,763 acres are proposed for treatment, which includes 599 acres of mechanical treatment and 1,164 acres of prescribed burning.
Detailed information and a project map of treatment units is available upon request by calling Rick Jewell at 264-1509.
The Forest Service has made preliminary assessment that this proposal falls within FSH 1909.15 Category 31.2(6), which is excluded from documentation in an EA or EIS, and there are no extraordinary circumstances that would preclude the use of the category. This comment period is intended to provide those interested in or affected by this proposal an opportunity to make their concerns known prior to a decision being made by the Responsible Official.
To be eligible to appeal the subsequent decision on this project, an individual or group must provide comment or otherwise express interest in the proposed action by the close of the comment period. (36 CFR 215.11 (pre-2003 regulations)). The comment period ends thirty (30) days after publication of this notice in the Pagosa Sun and cannot be extended.
This comment period is being provided pursuant to the July 2, 2005, order issued by the U. S. District Court for the Eastern District of California in Case No. CIV F-03-6386JKS.
The opportunity to comment ends 30 days following the date of publication of this legal notice. Written, facsimile, hand-delivered, oral, and electronic comments concerning this action will be accepted for 30 calendar days following the publication of this notice in the Pagosa Sun. The publication date of this paper is the exclusive means for calculating the comment period for this analysis. Those wishing to comment should not rely upon dates or timeframe information provided by any other source. The regulations prohibit extending the length of the comment period.
Written comments must be submitted to: District Ranger, PO Box 310, Pagosa Springs, CO 81147. The office business hours for those submitting hand-delivered comments are 8 am – 5 pm, Monday through Friday, excluding holidays. The Pagosa District Office is located at 180 Pagosa Street in Pagosa Springs, Colorado. Comments may also be faxed to Attn: Rick Jewell, fax number 264-1538
Oral comments must be provided at the Pagosa District office during normal business hours via telephone [970-264-1509] or in person, or at an official agency function (i.e. public meeting) that is designed to elicit public comments.
Electronic comments must be submitted in a format such as an email message, plain text (.txt), rich text format (.rtf), and Word (.doc) to HYPERLINK “mailto:comments-rocky-mountain-san-juan-pagosa@fs.fed.us” comments-rocky-mountain-san-juan-pagosa@fs.fed.us. In cases where no identifiable name is attached to an electronic message, a verification of identity will be required for appeal eligibility. A scanned signature is one way to provide verification. For electronically mailed comments the sender should normally receive an automated acknowledgement from the agency as a confirmation of receipt. If the sender does not receive an automated acknowledgement receipt of comments, it is the senders responbility to insure timely receipt by other means (36 C.F.R. 215.6 (4) (iii)).
It is the responsibility of persons providing comments to submit them by the close of the comment period. Individuals and organizations wishing to be eligible to appeal must provide the following information: Name and Address; Title of the proposed action; comments on the proposed action, along with supporting reasons that the Responsible Official should consider in reaching a decision; Signature or other verification of identity upon request; identification of the individual or organization who authored the comments(s) is necessary for appeal eligibility. For multiple names or multiple organizations, a signature must be provided for the individual authorized to represent each organization, or for each individual that wishes to have appeal eligibility. Individual members of organizations must submit their own substantive comments to meet the requirements of appeal eligibility as an individual, comments received on behalf of an organization are considered as those of the organization only.
Comments received in response to this solicitation, including names and addresses of those who comment will be considered part of the public record on this proposed action and will be available for public inspection. Comments submitted anonymously will be accepted and considered; however, those who only submit anonymous comments will not have standing to appeal the subsequent decision under 36 C.F.R. Part 215.
The USDA Forest Service is an Equal Opportunity Service Provider.
For further information contact Scott Wagner, Pagosa Ranger District, at 970-264-1511.
Published:
Published March 29, 2007 in The Pagosa Springs SUN.

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NOTICE OF PUBLIC TRUSTEE’S SALE
No. 4-2007

To Whom It May Concern: This Notice is given with regard to the following described Deed of Trust:
FS Development, Inc., Fred W. Schmidt, President= Grantor (Borrower)
Rio Grande Savings and Loan, Assoc., Mutual Association = Original Beneficiary
Rio Grand Savings and Loan, Assoc., Mutual Association = Current Beneficiary
$178,325.14 is the outstanding principal balance due and owing on the note upon the evidence of debt secured by the Deed of Trust as of February 12, 2007
May 17, 2001 = Date of Deed of Trust
May 18, 2001 = Recording Date of Deed of Trust
Archuleta = County of Recording
Reception # 20104215 = Reception number of Recorded Deed of trust on the note.
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED, that the legal holder of the indebtedness, in the note in the original principal amount of $ 182,000.00 dollars, secured by the Deed of Trust described above.
The real property to be foreclosed is described as follows:
LOT 2, OF A RE-PLAT AND MINOR SUBDIVISION OF THE WESTERLY 6.07 ACRES OF TRACT G PIEDRA ESTATES SUBDIVISION, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED MAY 18, 2001 AS RECEPTION NO. 20104196
The property described in this notice is all of the property now encumbered by the lien of the deed of trust.
THEREFORE, NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that I will at 10:00 o’clock a.m., on the date of April 19, 2007, sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder for cash, the real property described above, and all interest of said Grantor, the heirs and assigns of said Grantor, for the purpose of paying the indebtedness provided in said note and Deed of Trust, attorney’s fees, and the expenses of sale, and will deliver to the purchaser a certificate of purchase, all as provided by law.
February 26, 2007 /s/ Lois Baker
Public Trustee, Archuleta County
By: /s/ Vicky S. Netherton, Deputy
THE LIEN OF DEED OF TRUST BEING FORECLOSED MAY NOT BE A FIRST LIEN.
THE LAW FIRM OF GIBBONS & ASSOCIATES, PC IS ACTING AS A DEBT COLLECTOR AND IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE.
Attorney for the Owner of Evidence of Debt: Gibbons & Associations, PC, 800 1st Ave., Monte Vista, CO 81144, (719)852-4731
Published March 8, 15, 22, 29 and April 5, 2007 in The Pagosa Springs SUN.NOTICE OF SALE

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Archuleta County
Request for Proposals

Review of Engineering Analysis, Opinions, and Conclusions
Archuleta County is seeking proposals from engineering firms having a strong background in water delivery and water storage systems to review and evaluate an engineering report prepared in 2003 for the San Juan Water Conservancy. This engineering report contains recommendations for needed future storage and options for locations for the recommended storage. Archuleta County is interested in knowing if a 35,000 acre-foot reservoir is justified based on population projections, and if the proposed location of the 35,000 acre-foot reservoir is optimal based on sound water distribution practices.
In addition to a proposal to perform the services listed above, the successful firm shall include these optional services in their proposal: 1) Comparison of the Pagosa Area Water and Sanitation District’s rate and fee structure with other Colorado water and sanitation districts 2) An evaluation of Pagosa Area Water and Sanitation District’s operational policies and existing infrastructure with the intent of identifying efficiencies that may be obtained by implementing best management practices for water acquisition, storage, treatment and distribution, and waste water recovery, treatment, and discharge.
Archuleta County will select a firm to provide the services requested using value offered for total cost of the project, and Qualification Based Selection. References or other information confirming the firm’s qualifications may be submitted and will be considered in the selection process. Each firm which wishes to submit a proposal in response to this Request for Proposals (RFP) must submit three (3) copies of the proposal along with a cover letter of not more than two pages.
Archuleta County shall enter into a contract with the selected engineering firm for the scope of this project only. Archuleta County reserves the right to reject any or all proposals received.
Proposals should be mailed to Archuleta County Administration, P.O. Box 1507, Pagosa Springs, CO 81147 and postmarked no later than April 15th, 2007.
Published March 29, 2007 in The Pagosa Springs SUN.

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Notice of Public Hearing
Board of County Commissioners
Archuleta County, Colorado

PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to CRS 30-28-204 that the Board of County Commissioners of Archuleta County, Colorado, will hold a public hearing to consider amendments to the Archuleta County 2006 International Residential Code: the addition of Appendix F Radon Control Methods outlining radon mitigation measures to be implemented on all new residential construction.
The public hearing will be held on Tuesday, April 17, 2007, at 1:30 PM at the regularly scheduled Board of County Commissioner’s meeting in the County Commissioner’s meeting room, 449 San Juan Blvd, Pagosa Springs, Colorado, at which time all interested parties will be heard. The revisions will be available for review at the Archuleta County Planning Department, 46 Eaton Dr, Ste 1, Pagosa Springs, Colorado.
Written comments may also be submitted to the Board of County Commissioners, P. O. Box 1507, Pagosa Springs, CO 81147, at or prior to said public hearing.
Published March 29, 2007 in The Pagosa Springs SUN.

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PUBLIC NOTICE

The Town of Pagosa Springs Town Council will hold a public hearing to review a request to consolidate Lots 4A-2 and 4A-3, Village Apartments Minor Subdivision, Town of Pagosa Springs, located at X Eaton Drive. The Public Hearing is scheduled for 5:00 p.m. on April 3, 2007 to be held at Town Hall at 551 Hot Springs Boulevard. Anyone wishing to comment should contact the Town Planning Department or attend the public hearing and be heard.
Published March 29, 2007 in The Pagosa Springs SUN.

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INVITATION TO BID

Archuleta County is seeking contractors qualified in bridge repairs for a repair project on the North Pagosa Boulevard Bridge, Pagosa Springs, Colorado. Project includes repairs, modifications, and additions to the North Pagosa Boulevard Bridge and new cast-in-place headwalls for culverts in two locations, traffic control, and associated materials, equipment, and appurtenances required for completely functioning structures, and as shown on bid documents prepared by Centennial Engineering, Inc. There will be a pre-bid conference 03/30/07 at 10 a.m. at the N. Pagosa Blvd Bridge. The deadline for submitting bids is 04/13/07 at 3 p.m. For full Invitation to Bid, contact Jen at (970) 264-5660 ext. 29.
Published March 22 and 29, 2007 in The Pagosa Springs SUN.

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NOTICE TO CREDITORS

Estate of ELIZABETH L. BELMEAR, also known as ELIZABETH BELMEAR, MARTHA ELIZABETH BELMEAR, MARTHA E. BELMEAR, MARTHA ELIZABETH LAY, MARTHA E. LAY and ELIZABETH LAY BELMEAR, Deceased
Case No. 07PR11
All persons having claims against the above-named estate are required to present them to the personal representative or to the District Court of Archuleta County on or before JULY 16, 2007, 2007, or the claims may be forever barred.
Garath Dean Belmear
5642 Noble Street
Golden, CO 80403
Published Mar
ch 15, 22 and 29, 2007 in The Pagosa Springs SUN.

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PUBLIC NOTICE

The Town Council of Pagosa Springs will hold a public hearing to review a request by the Archuleta County Board of County Commissioners, represented by Robert Campbell, to allow an exemption due to economic hardship from Ordinance 683-2006, and thereby allow demolition of the “County Courthouse” building located at 449 San Juan Street. The Public Hearing is scheduled for 5:00 p.m. on April 3, 2007, to be held at Town Hall at 551 Hot Springs Boulevard. Anyone wishing to comment should contact the Town Planning Department or attend the public hearing and be heard.
Published March 22 and 29, 2007 in The Pagosa Springs SUN.

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PUBLIC NOTICE

The Town Council of Pagosa Springs will hold a public hearing to review and consider adoption of Historic Business District and Local Landmark Design Guidelines. The Public Hearing is scheduled for 5:00 p.m. on April 3, 2007, to be held at Town Hall at 551 Hot Springs Boulevard. Anyone wishing to comment should contact the Town Planning Department or attend the public hearing and be heard.
Published March 22 and 29, 2007 in The Pagosa Springs SUN.

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PUBLIC NOTICE

The Town of Pagosa Springs Town Council will hold a public hearing to review a request to vacate a portion of South 5th Street located north of Zuni Street. The Public Hearing is scheduled for 5:00 p.m. on April 3, 2007 to be held at Town Hall at 551 Hot Springs Boulevard. Anyone wishing to comment should contact the Town Planning Department or attend the public hearing and be heard.
Published March 29, 2007 in The Pagosa Springs SUN.

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NOTICE CONCERNING BUDGET AMENDMENT

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN to all interested parties that the necessity has arisen to amend the San Juan Water Conservancy District’s 2007 Budget; that a copy of the proposed Amended 2007 Budget has been filed at 100 Lyn Avenue, where the same is open for public inspection; and that adoption of a Resolution to Amend the 2007 Budget will be considered at a public meeting of the Board of Directors of the District to be held at 100 Lyn Avenue, Pagosa Springs, Colorado on April 9, 2007, at 9:15 o’clock a.m. Any elector within the District may, at any time prior to the final adoption of the Resolution to Amend the 2007 Budget, inspect and file or register any objections thereto.
SAN JUAN WATER CONSERVANCY DISTRICT
By /s/ Jack B. DeLange
Secretary
Published March 29, 2007 in The Pagosa Springs SUN.

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PUBLIC NOTICE

The Town of Pagosa Springs Town Council will hold a public hearing to review the Final Plan of the proposed Whispering Pines Phase 11 Townhomes, Planned Unit Development. The proposed project is located at X Eaton Drive and 260 Eaton Drive, more specifically Lot 4A-2, 4A-3, Village Apartments Minor Subdivision and 4B Central Core Subdivision, Town of Pagosa Springs. The Public Hearing is scheduled for 5:00 p.m. on April 3, 2007 to be held at Town Hall at 551 Hot Springs Boulevard. Anyone wishing to comment should contact the Town Planning Department or attend the public hearing and be heard.
Published March 29, 2007 in The Pagosa Springs SUN.

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PUBLIC NOTICE

The Town of Pagosa Springs Historic Preservation Board will hold a public hearing at a special meeting to review and consider recommendation for adoption of revisions to Section 21.14 of the Municipal Code. The Public Hearing is scheduled for 4:00 p.m. on March 22, 2007, to be held at Town Hall at 551 Hot Springs Boulevard. Anyone wishing to comment should contact the Town Planning Department or attend the public hearing and be heard.
Published March 22, 2007 in The Pagosa Springs SUN.

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Notice for Publication

A subdivision consisting of 29 lots; between 0.8 and 1.5 acres in size is proposed in NW 1⁄4 Section 9, T. 35N, R. 2W, N.M.P.M. The nearest cross streets are Industrial Drive and Cloman Blvd. Anyone who wishes to comment should contact either the Archuleta County Planning Department, P.O. Box 1507, Pagosa Springs, CO 81147-3877 prior to consideration of this Final Plat by the Board of County Commissioners on April 3, 2007, at 1:30pm in the County Courthouse or attend the public meeting and be heard.
Published March 29, 2007 in The Pagosa Springs SUN.

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Notice for Publication

A townhome subdivision of an existing apartment complex consisting of 15 units is proposed at 1158 Cloud Cap Avenue. The nearest cross streets are Cloud Cap Avenue and Hunter Court. Anyone who wishes to comment should contact either the Archuleta County Planning Department, P.O. Box 1507, Pagosa Springs, CO 81147-3877 prior to consideration of this Final Plat by the Board of County Commissioners on April 3, 2007, at 1:30pm in the County Courthouse or attend the public meeting and be heard.
Published March 29, 2007 in The Pagosa Springs SUN.

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Notice of Public Hearing
Board of County Commissioners
Archuleta County, Colorado

PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to CRS 30-28-112 that the Board of County Commissioners of Archuleta County, Colorado, will hold a public hearing to consider revisions to the Archuleta County Land Use Regulations. An item will be removed from the Archuleta County Land Use Regulations Section 4.4.2.2.9 requiring addresses for lots on recorded plats. The public hearing will be held on Tuesday, April 17, 2007 at 1:30PM in the County Courthouse, 449 San Juan Street, Pagosa Springs, Colorado, at which time all interested parties will be heard.
Written comments may also be submitted to the Board of County Commissioners, P. O. Box 1507, Pagosa Springs, CO 81147, at or prior to said public hearing.
Copies of the proposed amendments, as certified to the Board of County Commissioners by the County Planning Commission, will be available and may be examined at the Planning Department, 46 Eaton Drive, Suite 1, Pagosa Springs, Colorado, commencing on March 30, 2007.
Board of County Commissioners
Archuleta County, Colorado
Published March 29, 2007 in The Pagosa Springs SUN.

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Conditional Use Permit

A Conditional Use Permit for 6 single family dwellings located on approximately 1.1 acres is proposed in Lot 6 Block 4 of Lake Pagosa Park. The property is located at 282 Aspenglow approximately .25 miles from the intersection of Aspenglow and Piedra Road.
Comments regarding this proposal may be submitted to the Archuleta County Planning Department, P.O. Box 1507, Pagosa Springs, CO 81147-1507, telephone: (970) 731-3877 prior to the public hearing by the Board of County Commissioners on April 17, 2007, at 1:30 p.m. in the County Courthouse. If you prefer, you may attend the public hearing and be heard.
Published March 29 and April 5, 2007 in The Pagosa Springs SUN.

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NOTICE OF PUBLIC TRUSTEE SALE
Public Trustee No. 5-2007

To Whom it may Concern: This Notice is given with regard to the following described Deed of Trust:
Grantor (Borrower): Derica Preble and Jason Preble
Original Beneficiary: Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as nominee for Countrywide Home Loans, Inc.
Current Owner of the Evidence of Debt: Countrywide Home Loans, Inc.
Date of Deed of Trust: April 25, 2006
Recording Date of Deed of Trust: May 10, 2006
Original Principal Amount of Evidence of Debt: $229,500.00
Outstanding Principal Amount of Evidence of Debt as of the date hereof: $228,500.86
County of Recording: Archuleta
Book and Page No. or Reception No. of Recorded Deed of Trust: at Reception No. 20604211
Legal Description of Real Property:
LOT 18, LAKE HATCHER PARK, COUNTY OF ARCHULETA, STATE OF COLORADO.
WHICH HAS THE ADDRESS OF 55 Pebble Cir Pagosa Springs, CO 81147-8822
THE PROPERTY DESCRIBED HEREIN IS ALL OF THE PROPERTY ENCUMBERED BY THE LIEN OF THE DEED OF TRUST.
THE LIEN FORECLOSED MAY NOT BE A FIRST LIEN.
Countrywide Home Loans, Inc., the owner of the Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust described herein, has filed written election and demand for sale as provided by law and in said Deed of Trust.
THEREFORE, Notice is Hereby Given that I will, at 10:00 AM o’clock in the forenoon of April 26, 2007, at the front door of the Archuleta County Public Trustee’s Office, 449 San Juan Street, P O Box 790, Pagosa Springs, Colorado, sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder for cash, the said real property and all interest of the said Grantor(s), Grantor(s)’ heirs and assigns therein, for the purpose of paying the indebtedness provided in said Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust, plus attorneys’ fees, the expenses of sale and other items allowed by law, and will deliver to the purchaser a Certificate of Purchase, all as provided by law.
CASTLE MEINHOLD & STAWIARSKI, LLC IS ACTING AS A DEBT COLLECTOR AND IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION PROVIDED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE.
Dated: 3-6-07
/s/ Lois Baker
Public Trustee in and for the County of
Archuleta, Colorado
Attorney:
Castle Meinhold & Stawiarski, LLC
Caren Jacobs Castle
999 18th Street, Suite 2201
Denver, CO 80202
(303) 865-1480
Published March 15, 22, 29, April 5 and 12, 2007 in The Pagosa Springs SUN.District Court, Archuleta County, State of Colorado

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NOTICE OF PUBLIC TRUSTEE’S SALE
No. 6-2007

This Notice is given with regard to the Deed of Trust described as follows:
Original Grantor (Borrower): WSRE INVESTMENT, LTD
Original Beneficiary: PAGOSA REALTY, a Colorado Partnership
Current Owner of Evidence of Debt: PAGOSA REALTY, a Colorado Partnership
Date of Deed of Trust: May 1, 2001 (Modified June 27, 2005)
Recording Date of Deed of Trust: May 18, 2001 (Modified Sept. 15, 2005)
County of Recording: ARCHULETA
Reception and/or Film Nos. of Recorded Deed of Trust: 20104195 (modified TD 20509695)
TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN:
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that the owner of the evidence of debt secured by the Deed of Trust described above, has filed written election and demand for sale as provided in said Deed of Trust. The original principal amount of the Evidence of Debt was $509,659 (modified to $391,894) dollars. The outstanding principal balance due and owing was THREE HUNDRED SIXTY NINE THOUSAND EIGHT HUNDRED NINETY FOUR DOLLARS AND 00/100 ($369,894.00) dollars, as of December 27, 2006.
The property being foreclosed is ALL of the property encumbered by said Deed of Trust, and is described as follows:
Lot 3, Piedra Estates Subdivision the Westerly 6.07 Acres of Tract G, according to the plat thereof recorded December 11, 1997 as Reception No. 97009658, Archuleta County, Colorado, and as thereafter amended and pursuant to a Re-Plat of the Subdivision recorded May 18, 2001 as Reception No. 20104196.
Also known by street and number as: parcel Number 569915206047R
THEREFORE NOTICE IS GIVEN that I will at 10:00 o’clock AM, on the date of May 10, 2007, at front door of Archuleta County Treasurer’s Office, 449 San Juan St., Pagosa Springs, Colorado, sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder for cash, the real property described above, and all interest of the Grantor, the heirs, successors and assigns of the Grantor, for the purpose of paying the indebtedness provided in the evidence of debt and Deed of Trust, attorney’s fees, and the expenses of sale, and will deliver to the purchaser a certificate of purchase, all as provided by law.
Date: March 20, 2007
/s/ Lois Baker
Public Trustee, ARCHULETA County, State of Colorado
/s/ Vicky S. Netherton
Deputy Public Trustee
David B. Kirkpatrick #36964
960 E. 2nd Ave
Durango, CO 81301
Phone Number: 970-247-0269
FAX Number: 970-247-0277
Name and address of attorney for owner of evidence of debt
Filed in triplicate
Published March 29, April 5, 12, 19 and 26, 2007 in The Pagosa Springs SUN.

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IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF BRADLEY COUNTY, TENNESSEE

BRYAN MARK GODLEY )
Plaintiff, )
)
vs. ) )
RITA ANN WALKER GODLEY, )
Defendant. )
Docket No. V-07-183
ORDER OF PUBLICATION
It appearing from the Complaint in this cause, which is sworn to, that the Defendant, RITA ANN WALKER GODLEY, is a resident of the State of Colorado; and it further appearing that her whereabouts are unknown so that ordinary process cannot be served upon her.
It is therefore ordered that said Defendant, RITA ANN WALKER GODLEY, will appear and make defense within thirty (30) days of the Complaint, or the same will be taken for confessed as to default and set for hearing ex parte, and that a copy of this order be published for four consecutive weeks in the Pagosa Sun Newspaper, a newspaper published in Pagosa Springs, Colorado.
Within that time Defendant is also required to serve a copy of her pleadings upon PHILIP M. JACOBS, Plaintiff’s Attorney whose address is P.O. Box 191, 30 Second Street, Cleveland, Tennessee 37364-0191.
Dated this 5th day of March, 2007
/s/ Lawrence H. Puckett
CIRCUIT COURT JUDGE
LOGAN, THOMPSON, MILLER
BILBO & THOMPSON, P.C.
BY: /s/ PM Jacobs
PHILIP M. JACOBS (BPR#024996)
Attorney for Plaintiff
30 Second Street, PO Box 191
Cleveland, TN 37364-0191
(423) 476-2251
Published March 29, April 5, 12 and 19, 2007 in The Pagosa Springs SUN.

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NOTICE OF PUBLIC TRUSTEE SALE

Public Trustee No. 3-2007

To Whom it may Concern: This Notice is given with regard to the following described Deed of Trust:
Grantor (Borrower): Clarance S Espinosa and Angelique M Lucas
Original Beneficiary: Wells Fargo Home Mortgage, Inc.
Current Owner of the Evidence of Debt: Wells Fargo Bank, N.A.
Date of Deed of Trust: July 29, 2003
Recording Date of Deed of Trust: July 30, 2003
Original Principal Amount of Evidence of Debt: $83,686.s00
Outstanding Principal Amount of Evidence of Debt as of the date hereof: $83,387.82
County of Recording: Archuleta
Book and Page No. or Reception No. of Recorded Deed of Trust: at Reception No. 20307523
Legal Description of Real Property:
LOTS 118 AND 119, PAGOSA VISTA, ARCHULETA COUNTY, STATE OF COLORADO.
WHICH HAS THE ADDRESS OF 108 Canyon Circle Pagosa Springs, CO 81147
THE PROPERTY DESCRIBED HEREIN IS ALL OF THE PROPERTY ENCUMBERED BY THE LIEN OF THE DEED OF TRUST.
THE LIEN FORECLOSED MAY NOT BE A FIRST LIEN.
Wells Fargo Bank, N.A., the owner of the Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust described herein, has filed written election and demand for sale as provided by law and in said Deed of Trust.
THEREFORE, Notice is Hereby Given that I will, at 10:00 o’clock in the forenoon of April 12, 2007, at the front door of the Archuleta County Public Trustee’s Office, 449 San Juan Street, P O Box 790, Pagosa Springs, Colorado, sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder for cash, the said real property and all interest of the said Grantor(s), Grantor(s)’ heirs and assigns therein, for the purpose of paying the indebtedness provided in said Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust, plus attorneys’ fees, the expenses of sale and other items allowed by law, and will deliver to the purchaser a Certificate of Purchase, all as provided by law.
CASTLE MEINHOLD & STAWIARSKI, LLC IS ACTING AS A DEBT COLLECTOR AND IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION PROVIDED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE.
Dated: February 21, 2007
/s/ Lois Baker
Public Trustee in and for the County of
Archuleta, Colorado
/s/ Vicky S. Netherton, Deputy
Attorney:
Castle Meinhold & Stawiarski, LLC
Caren Jacobs Castle
999 18th Street, Suite 2201
Denver, CO 80202
(303) 865-1480
Published March 1, 8, 15, 22, and 29, 2007 in The Pagosa Springs SUN.

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PUBLIC NOTICE

The Town Council of Pagosa Springs will hold a public hearing to review a request by the Archuleta County Board of County Commissioners, represented by Robert Campbell, to amend the Historic Overlay District as adopted in Ordinance No. 633-2004. The proposed amendment will remove the property located at 449 San Juan Street from the Historic Overlay District. The property is more specifically described as: Beginning at a point on the south line of San Juan Street, 250 feet east of the southeast corner of San Juan and 5th Street in the Town of Pagosa Springs, Colorado, and the said southeast corner also being the northwest corner of said Lot 2 of the Southwest Quarter of Section 13, Township 35 North, Range 2 West, N.M.P.M.; thence East along the south line of said San Juan Street 225 feet to a point; thence South on a line parallel with fifth Street 150 feet to a point; thence West on a line parallel with San Juan Street 225 feet to a point; thence North on a line parallel with Fifth Street 150 feet to the point of beginning. The Public Hearing is scheduled for 5:00 p.m. on April 3, 2007, to be held at Town Hall at 551 Hot Springs Boulevard. Anyone wishing to comment should contact the Town Planning Department or attend the public hearing and be heard.
Published March 22 and 29, 2007 in The Pagosa Springs SUN.

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SHERIFF’S NOTICE OF SALE

DISTRICT COURT, ARCHULETA COUNTY,
COLORADO
Court Address: Combined Court
449 San Juan Street
P.O. Box 148
Pagosa Springs, CO 81147
Phone Number: (970) 264-2400
Plaintiff(s):
FAIRFIELD RESORTS, INC., f/k/a FAIRFIELD COMMUNITIES, INC., A DELAWARE CORPORATION
v.
Defendant(s):
R. EUGENE BEEDE, CATHERINE A. BEEDE, JANELLE A. BENTON, CHARLES R. BOWMAN, MICHELE M. BOWMAN, JEFF GARDNER, DEBBIE GARDNER, BILLIE RAY FOREMAN, FRANCES M. FOREMAN, PHILLIP R. CLAYTON, JERRY L. HASSELL, PATRICIA A. HASSELL, GARY DYER AND DEBRA DYER
Submitting Attorney:
SHAND, NEWBOLD & CHAPMAN, P.C.
Keith Newbold
150 East 9th Street, Suite 400
P.O. Box 2790
Durango, CO 81302
Phone Number: (970) 247-3091
Fax Number: (970) 247-3100
E-Mail: knewbold@snc-law.com
Atty. Reg. No: 010629
Case Number: 06-CV-137
SHERIFF’S NOTICE OF SALE
Under a Judgment and Decree of Foreclosure entered February 20, 2007, in the above-entitled action, I am ordered to sell the following property, which is all of the property currently encumbered by the Mortgage described in said Judgment and Decree of Foreclosure, as detailed in the table below.
The Plaintiff named above is the judgment creditor in this action and the current owner of the evidence of debt (the judgment entered herein) secured by the property being sold; and as of February 6, 2007, the outstanding balance due and owning on such judgment is judgment is detailed in the table below.
Defendant/Property
R. Eugene Beede and Catherine A. Beede A 210,000/17,743,000 undivided fee simple absolute interest in Units 7873-7874 in Building 37, as tenants in common with the other undivided interest owners of said building of PEREGRINE TOWNHOUSES PHASE VII, as depicted on the Plat recorded at Reception Number 20005495, subject to Declaration of Protective Covenants and Interval Ownership for Peregrine Townhouses recorded at Reception Number 173556, Third Supplemental Declaration recorded March 13, 2000 as Reception No. 20002414 and any amendments and supplements thereto, all in the Office of the County Clerk and Recorder in and for Archuleta County, Colorado.
Matter Amount
Unpaid Mortgage $14,067.63
Interest at 15% $3,607.48
Late Fees $1,839.59
Costs $299.78
Attorneys Fees $1,100.00
Total $31,296.67
Defendant/Property
Janelle A. Benton Unit Week Number 3, Unit Number 7211, Building Number 6, in “PTARMIGAN TOWNHOUSES PHASE II”, according to and as located on the recorded Map thereof filed for record June 7, 1988 as Reception No. 156199 and in accordance with and as limited and defined by the Declaration of Protective Covenants and Interval Ownership recorded February 18, 1988 as Reception No. 153557, First Amendment to Declaration of Protective Covenants recorded November 2, 1988 as Reception No. 159240, Second Amendment to Declaration recorded October 3, 1990 as Reception No. 175327, First Supplemental Declaration recorded June 7, 1988 as Reception No. 156200 and First Amendment to First, Second and Third Supplementals recorded October 3, 1990 as Reception No. 175326, all in the Office of the County Clerk and Recorder in and for Archuleta County, Colorado.
Matter Amount
Unpaid Mortgage $4,871.32
Interest at 15% $1,249.19
Late Fees $15.84
Costs $255.88
Attorneys Fees $1,100.00
Total $15,480.56
Defendant/Property
Charles R. Bowman and Michele M. Bowman A 308,000/17,743,000 undivided fee simple absolute interest in Units 7849-7850 in Building 25, as tenants in common with the other undivided interest owners of said building of PEREGRINE TOWNHOUSES PHASE V, as depicted on the Plat recorded at Reception Number 99006555, subject to Declaration of Protective Covenants and Interval Ownership for Peregrine Townhouses recorded at Reception Number 173556, Second Supplemental Declaration recorded July 8, 1999 as Reception No. 99006556 and any amendments and supplements thereto, all in the Office of the County Clerk and Recorder in and for Archuleta County, Colorado.
Matter Amount
Unpaid Mortgage $11,788.08
Interest at 15% $3,022.92
Late Fees $2,895.53
Costs $258.57
Attorneys Fees $1,100.00
Total $23,279.74
Defendant/Property
Jeff Gardner and Debbie Gardner A 105,000/17,743,000 undivided fee simple absolute interest in Units 7811-7812 in Building 6, as tenants in common with the other undivided interest owners of said building of PEREGRINE TOWNHOUSES PHASE II, as depicted on the Plat recorded at Reception Number 173554, subject to Declaration of Protective Covenants and Interval Ownership for Peregrine Townhouses recorded at Reception Number 173556, and any amendments and supplements thereto, all in the Office of the County Clerk and Recorder in and for Archuleta County, Colorado.
Matter Amount
Unpaid Mortgage $3,473.96
Interest at 15% $890.86
Late Fees $622.88
Costs $303.42
Attorneys Fees $1,100.00
Total $8,827.21
Defendant/Property
Phillip R. Clayton Unit Week Number 9 Unit Number 7114, Building Number 4, in “ELK RUN TOWNHOUSES”, according to and as located on the recorded Map thereof filed for record June 26, 1986 as Reception No. 140480, and in accordance with and as limited and defined by the Declaration of Protective Covenants and Interval Ownership, recorded June 26, 1986 as Reception No. 140481, First Amendment thereto recorded August 13, 1986 under Reception No. 141512 and Second Amendment recorded December 1, 1987 as Reception No. 151976, all in the Office of the County Clerk and Recorder in and for Archuleta County, Colorado.
Matter Amount
Unpaid Mortgage $4,863.19
Interest at 15% $1,247.11
Late Fees $12.88
Costs $305.88
Attorneys Fees $1,100.00
Total $16,277.62
Defendant/Property
Jerry L. Hassell and Patricia A. Hassell Unit Week Number 15, Unit Number 54, Building Number 54, in “EAGLE’S LOFT - PHASE IV”, according to and as located on the recorded Map thereof filed for record February 20, 1986 as Reception No. 137941, and in accordance with and as limited and defined by the Declaration of Individual and/or Interval Ownership, recorded July 29, 1983 in Book 200 at Page 834 and First Supplemental Declaration of Individual and/or Interval Ownership recorded October 7, 1983 in Book 203 at Page 564 and Second Supplemental Declaration of Individual and/or Interval Ownership recorded May 30, 1984 as Reception No. 123459 and First Amendment to Second Supplemental Declaration of Individual and/or Interval Ownership recorded July 13, 1984 as Reception No. 124494. Third Supplemental Declaration of Individual and/or Interval Ownership recorded July 10, 1985 as Reception No. 132403, all in the Office of the County Clerk and Recorder in and for Archuleta County, Colorado.
Matter Amount
Unpaid Mortgage: $4,151.65
Interest at 15% $1,064.64
Late Fees $10.80
Costs $437.43
Attorneys Fees $1,100.00
Total $13,986.10
Defendant/Property
Gary Dyer and Debra Dyer Unit Week Number 42, Unit Number 7522, Building Number 5, in “PHASE III OF VILLAGE POINTE CONDOMINIUMS”, according to and as located on the recorded Map thereof filed for record November 21, 1990 as Reception No. 176324 and in accordance with and as limited and defined by the Declaration of Condominium and Interval Ownership recorded January 6, 1989 as Reception No. 160495, First Amendment to Declaration of Condominium and Interval Ownership recorded February 16, 1989 as Reception No. 161151, Second Amendment to Declaration recorded January 16, 1990 as Reception No. 168714, Second Supplemental Declaration recorded November 21, 1990 as Reception No. 176323 and Amendment to Second Supplemental Declaration recorded February 7, 1991 as Reception No. 177636, all in the Office of the County Clerk and Recorder in and for Archuleta County, Colorado.
Matter Amount
Unpaid Mortgage: $6,040.70
Interest at 15% $1,549.07
Late Fees $6,776.01
Costs $353.42
Attorneys Fees $1,100.00
Total $31,661.19
I shall offer for public sale to the highest bidder, for cash, at public auction, all the right, title and interest of the Defendants in said property on Wednesday, April 25, 2007, at 10:00 A.M., at the Sheriff’s Office, 449 San Juan Street Pagosa Springs, Colorado.
NOTE: THE DEED OF TRUST BEING FORECLOSED MAY NOT BE A FIRST LIEN.
This Sheriff’s Notice Of Sale is signed this 1st day of March 2007.
/s/ Peter L. Gonzalez, Sheriff,
Peter Gonzalez
Archuleta County, Colorado
Published March 8, 15, 22, 29 and April 5, 2007 in The Pagosa Springs SUN.

Thursday, March 29, 2007


PHTV - Motivation and direction

By Louis Sherman
Staff Writer

Ten juniors and seniors from Pagosa Springs High School travelled to Anaheim, Calif., for the fourth annual Student Television Network Affiliate Convention to compete, hone their skills, meet peers and kickoff the new video-sharing Web site Schooltube.com.

The convention, which took place from March 7 to 10 at the Disney Land Hotel, was attended by 1,800 students and 200 teachers from hundreds of schools across the country. The schedule included on-site video contests, a music video showcase and film festival, a dance, keynote speakers and workshops for both students and teachers. Reporting, news writing, software, graphics, film, photojournalism, interviewing, media law and ethics were among scores of topics discussed.

The convention’s general theme was “convergence,” a word which encapsulates the goal of most news outlets, to present their content through as many different media as possible (whether broadcasting on school televisions, uploading video to Schooltube.com or maintaining Web sites).

And thus Pagosa’s Landon Bayger, Tad Beavers, Caleb Burggraaf, Hannah Clark, Dilan Erkisi, Del Greer, Cole Kraetsch, Ben Owens, Keith Pitcher and Becca Stephens converged on Anaheim (and a few California beaches) with students from diverse American regions, prompted by an interest in video.

The Pagosa students all participated in and completed various contests, in categories including music video, video essay, public service announcement, anchoring and spot feature. According to senior Ben Owens, “the competition was definitely the most fulfilling part,” since it forced the young video broadcasters to create and produce a project on site in such a short time, while giving them the opportunity to see how their work stacked up to other productions.

After the full day of hectic work on the music video production, junior Becca Stephens said the best part of the competition was the accomplishment of finishing the task.

In breakout session students had the opportunity to learn from experts in the field and other students, building on their experience and having plenty of fun in the process. Tad Beavers cited the opportunity to work with other students committed to video journalism and production as an important benefit of attending the convention. The Los Angeles area sights weren’t a detraction either, he said.

Over the last year, STN has nearly doubled in size, now with nearly 800 affiliate high schools. This expansion has been under the watch of Pagosa’s Curtis Maberry, who teaches Broadcast Journalism at the high school and led the crew of Pirates in Los Angeles. Maberry has been president of STN for the last three years.

STN was founded in 1999 by a group of broadcast teachers in Springfield, Mo. Maberry got on board that same year, when he was trained in the first STN teacher summer workshop. Six months later, he was on the board of directors, giving Pagosa Springs representation in a growing national organization.

STN is supported by professional organizations such as the Radio and Television News Directors Foundation, the National Television Academy Foundation and the American Academy of Arts. It draws sponsorship from Avid Technology, Apple Inc. and various college programs.

But in its modest beginnings, STN came out of a need for broadcasting teachers to get education, training and connection to other educators and resources, said Maberry.

According to its Web site, “The Student Television Network is made up of affiliate schools from coast to coast with an active interest in furthering scholastic broadcasting and video production. STN seeks to ‘network’ students, teachers and schools with one another.”

In addition to its yearly convention, STN also organizes mail-in contests, teacher training, discussion boards and scholarships for teachers and students.

In an interview available on Schooltube, Owens said STN greatly benefits students by providing up-to-date training of high school teachers. This knowledge is passed down to students.

Now it is turning its attention to convergence on the Web with Schooltube.com (which was unveiled during the convention), allowing students to share their work in a safe, monitored online environment. Before Schooltube was launched, STN affiliates, teachers and students could only share work at convention or by compilation DVDs.

Schooltube’s “chief selling point is that it is safe, that teachers approve the content,” said Maberry. The site also follows federal privacy laws, the policies of local school districts and STN’s code of ethics and content standards. On top of these safeguards, STN is in the process of producing a code for creative content.

STN’s current code of ethics directs students with key journalistic ideals, under the headings of “seek truth and report it,” “minimize harm,” “act independently” and “be accountable.” The future code of creative conduct would more directly address Web broadcasting and video sharing issues.

Maberry said that Schooltube not only protects students from harmful content and online exploitation, but it also provides them with the assurance that the videos they view are of high quality. “A lot of these guys don’t like what they see on Youtube,” said Maberry, “and don’t want to have to look through a lot of junk to find a good video.”

Additional benefits to the site include the ability for students to share their school productions with family across the country, while community members can get a sense of what broadcasting students are learning in their local high schools.
As an example of the potential for sharing videos through Schooltube, Maberry related an anecdote of his first post. One of his students, Chase Moore, was on a mission trip in China when Maberry uploaded the first selection of Pirate video to Schooltube, but despite the distance, Moore was able to view his video immediately with a few mouse clicks.

Students can access Schooltube from school to share and view video, while many schools have other sharing sites (like Youtube) blocked to protect students from harmful content.

In another Schooltube interview, Kelly Sause said of key importance is the site’s function as a venue for students to exhibit their work and view the work of others.
For teachers that register on the site, Schooltube provides lesson plans, equipment recommendations, teacher training modules, fundraising techniques and other resources.

Currently, there are around 20 Pirate videos posted on Schooltube. Maberry said there would be up to 40 available to viewers by early April. To see the videos of Pagosa students, simply open www.schooltube.com in your web browser. Select United States, then Colorado, then Pagosa Springs High School. Select from the channels at the top of your screen to choose from the selection of videos produced by Pagosa students.

Pagosa’s place in STN and on Schooltube is based on the success of Pagosa High Television (PHTV). “We call ourselves national award winning PHTV,” said Maberry, since his crew brought in a first place in the collaborative commercial category last year, adding to two second places and other national awards.

PHTV began as an extracurricular program in 2000, but after two years the students proved that education in media and broadcasting benefited the district, since the skills and thought-processes that are involved can benefit other disciplines, said Maberry.

In 2002, the high school offered one section of Media Communications/Broadcast Journalism. Today it offers the course every semester, along with Advanced Video Production, which runs concurrently.

Backed by an academic curriculum, PHTV has produced over 25 student broadcasts over the last six years — providing the high school with news, entertainment and public service announcements.

The program has been largely funded by community contributions. With the help of donations from Rotary, San Jan Basin Health, Kiwanis and Wells Fargo, PHTV has nine mini-dv cameras and 12 digital editing stations in its arsenal of equipment. (PHTV also receives $1,000 in funding from the district every year.)

Pagosa students have in turn benefitted the community by producing videos for United Way, the Pagosa Fire Protection District, fourth-grade graduation and freshman orientation, while providing technical assistance throughout Pagosa.

Maberry acknowledged that some school programs across the country have higher-end cameras and video technology, but “it’s not the equipment that tells the story,” he said. Rather, PHTV’s success is based on the individual creativity of Pagosa students.

Students are taught basic skills to observe and analyze media productions, which leads to media literacy (a state educational requirement). On top of analytical abilities, they are taught skills and given experience to become better story tellers. Broadcasting journalism students complete assignments including video stories without dialogue, 30 second public service announcements, news magazine broadcasts, creative projects, music videos, documentaries and short films.

PHTV and video broadcasting provide students an interesting connection point to important skills, such as analysis, writing, communication and creative thought.
For many students, who may not otherwise be interested in school, video production “gives motivation and direction for their lives,” said Maberry.

Community members have the opportunity to see what these students are able to accomplish. Check out Schooltube, or attend PHTV’s annual “Kermit Awards,” which will be held in May. The awards ceremony will feature all of the winning student videos.

Food for Thought

Time for curry, and kisses

By Karl Isberg
PREVIEW columnist

It’s a question I am asked frequently.

I’m sure you’re familiar with it, as well.

“Which native-born Brits of Indian ancestry would you most like to kiss on the mouth?”

Perhaps you need to review a long list of candidates and, thus, hesitate when asked this question.

I don’t.

Any time I’m asked, there is nary a pause.

“Well, Kirit and Meena Pathak, of course. Who else?”

Not only have each of these illustrious folks received the Order of the British Empire (reason enough to give anyone a big, wet smooch), but they are responsible for the darned best Indian food products available anywhere.

Kirit and Meena Pathak run Patak’s Foods Limited, registered offices 2 Bloomsbury Street, London. They oversee the world’s largest Indian food manufacturing plant (180,000 square feet) in Leigh, Lancashire, in northwest England.

I love the Pathaks, at a distance: Kirit, the business mind; Meena the overseer of food product quality, the author of a couple cookbooks and an advocate of not keeping spices for more than three weeks (and always storing them tightly sealed and out of the light).

Here’s the thing: I am more than partial to Indian food. More accurately, I love to use Indian products and flavors in my cooking; they are incredibly diverse and suit my tendency to improvise. It is hard to go wrong with these flavors as the base for a culinary experiment — unless, of course, you’re trying something like a peanut butter/tandoori salad dressing or an essence-of-vindaloo birthday cake. Trust me, these do not work; there’s no need to try them

While Patak’s products are not readily available on local store shelves, they are easy to acquire during a trip to the big city, or via special delivery since the British company forged a partnership with Hormel.

And, if you like curries as much as I do, it’s time to round up a couple bottles of Patak’s pastes.

Sure, you can make your own.

In theory, you can also design a new jumbo jet aircraft, write the next Great American Novel and outdo Michelangelo on the fresco front.

It’s a whole lot easier to buy some basic products — say, a few jars and tins of Patak’s products and a paint-by-number kit featuring a crude reproduction of the Sistine Chapel ceiling.

I get to thinking about liplocking the Pathak’s the other night after I visit their Web site — something I do now and then just to stay in touch. The site provides everything you need to know about this stellar enterprise. You can read the history of the business, founded in London by the patriarch, L.G. Pathak, about the first little shop, the struggles, the triumphs, etc. There is a photo of Kirit and Meena. Check it out: They’re attractive, kissable folks. There is a section of product information, a section with some recipes. High-grade info abounds. I spend an hour on the Patak site, thoroughly engrossed by the photos and data.

What propels me there is the use of some of Patak’s Madras hot paste. I make it a point to keep this vital ingredient on hand, as well as some vindaloo paste.

The Madras hot is fairly typical: turmeric, garlic, coriander, tamerind (for that sour something) cumin, chile, ginger, oil, maize flour, salt and the always mysterious “spices.”

I know well that the Madras paste is ideally suited for “meat” — meaning beef and lamb. But, after enduring a recent and distressing bout with gout and its hideous cure, I am hesitant to cook any kind of red meat. So, I purchase a couple outlandlishly expensive skinless chicken breasts at the market, along with a knob of fresh ginger, a head of garlic, a white onion, a can of crushed, fire-roasted tomatoes, a container of whole milk ,a can of coconut milk and a container of plain yogurt. I have a half box of couscous at home, as well as some chicken broth, a bag of frozen teensy green beans and the makings of a simple salad — baby greens, tomato, cucumber, lemons and limes for a citrus vinaigrette.

The chicken is a puzzler. First off, they highlight the fact it is hormone-free. Well, all poultry raised in America is somewhat hormone free — somewhat because, if the chickens are fed animal products from animals that have ingested hormones … They also hype the fact the chicken is “free range” which could mean there is a door at the far end of the massive poultry facility through which, theoretically, the pullet can prance once it makes its way through the crowd.

Oh, and lest I forget, they have removed the breast bone and skin .

And it is 8 million dollars an ounce!

So, muttering all the while, I wash, dry and chunk the bird breast.

I thinly slice a small white onion and I pulverize nine or ten cloves of garlic. I peel the end of the knob of ginger, remove a long piece, cut it in half, then thinly julienne the halves, Then I finely mince the strips. For you sticklers, I create a fine brunoise.

Dare I use the Madras.

Of course.

I season and sauté the chicken, getting some critical brown on the chunks and a decent fond in the pan. I turn the heat down and toss in the onion, cooking until soft. I add a quarter cup of the tomatoes and cook until the fruit begins to turn a darker color and caramelize. I deglaze the pan with some chicken broth, add four heaping tablespoons of Patak’s Madras, throw in the garlic and ginger, turn the heat down a touch more, cover and gently simmer for a while.

The first floor of the house smells great! Nothing lights up the atmosphere like a curry.

In the meantime, not having the energy to make a raita and content to go with plain yogurt as a palate cooler (I could as easily resort to cottage cheese, which the great vindaloo master, the late Kirk Hunter, used in place of raita), I set to work on the salad and steam the green beans.

I whip up the couscous — perhaps the easiest, and quickest side dish known to man — then get to finishing the chicken. I open the can of coconut milk, taking care not to shake it in the hopes the fats have coagulated at the top of the can. Why? Because it’s the fat I want! Who needs the watery crud beneath it? Save it for a badly conceived cocktail.

I spoon out about a quarter cup of the coconut fat and add it to the chicken mix. I splash in a touch more chicken broth, then simmer until I am satisfied with the consistency — in this case, the consistency of a moderately thick gravy. I squeeze in the juice of a half lemon and I am ready for action.

I dress a salad with the vinaigrette. I pile a mound of couscous in the center of a wide, shallow bowl and I spoon the chicken mix, with plenty of the sauce, over the top. On one side of Mount Madras goes a stack of beans, on the other side a pool of soothing yogurt.

Kathy hovers above her bowl and inhales.

She takes a bite.

“Oh, man, this is one great curry. One of the best you’ve made.”

This tells me it is not hot enough.

But, she is right: It is tasty and the paste, mitigated by the coconut, suits the bird quite well.

“You know,” I say as we tie into seconds, “you’ve been talking about making a trip to Italy this summer?”

“Yep.”

“Well, I’ve been thinking. I’m not so wild about Tuscany or Puglia anymore.”

“Huh?”

“I mean, I still want to go somewhere across the pond, but I’ve been getting the London Jones lately. I want to take a spin on that gigantic ferris wheel contraption. I definitely need to see the Tate Modern … and, there’s some folks I just flat out gotta kiss.”



What's Cookin?

Green Chili and Garlic Hummus

By Kim Vernon, CSU Extension
PREVIEW columnist

2 1/2 cups garbanzo beans (cooked or canned, drained — reserved juice)

1/2 cup Tahini (sesame butter)

6 tablespoons fresh lemon juice

1/4 to 1/2 garbanzo bean juice or water

4 garlic cloves

1 teaspoon salt (1/2 if using canned beans)

1 1/2 teaspoons onion powder

4 ounces green chilies (chopped)

Combine all ingredients, except chilies in a blender and process on high for 1 to 2 minutes or until smooth and creamy. Pour into a bowl and stir in chilies, chill before serving.
Makes 2 1/2 cups

Allen Trefethen

The family of Allen Trefethen would like to invite friends and family to join a celebration of his life Friday, March 30, 5-ish at Dorothy’s Restaurant downtown, next to Citizens Bank.

A complete obituary will be in next week’s SUN

Crysten Scarpinato, 17, of Pagosa Springs, has been chosen as a state finalist in the National American Miss Colorado Pageant, to be held July 22-23 in Denver. The pageant is held for girls 16-18 with the winner advancing to the national pageant in California. The pageant seeks to recognize the accomplishments of each girl while encouraging her to set goals for the future. 

Blailand Espinosa is proud to announce the birth of his baby brother, Kyler Michael Espinosa. He was born on Feb. 20, 2007, at 3:06 p.m., weighing 6 pounds, 14.8 ounces and was 18 1/2 inches long. His proud parents are Clarance Espinosa and Angie Lucas, both of Pagosa Springs. Kyler’s grandparents are Lance and Elisha Lucas and Sam and Mary Espinosa, of Pagosa Springs. Great-great grandparents are Gary and Firma Lucas and the late Tony and Frances Lujan, of Pagosa Springs. 

Michael Lee Espinosa was born March 8, 2007, at 8:11 a.m. He was 6 pounds, 10.8 ounces and 18 1/2 inches long. Born to Misty House and Roman Espinosa of Pagosa Springs. Grandparents are Steve House and Karla Garcia of Durango, and Henry and Lou Jean Espinosa of Pagosa Springs.

Diandra Shae Lucero was born Jan. 4, 2007. Parents are Natasha Andrews and Dominque Lucero. Grandparents are Clifford Lucero, Jr., and Gina Lucero; and Donna Lister and Curtis Andrews of Salt Lake City, Utah.

 



Servando, Andrea, Adrianna and Hernan would like to announce the newest family member, Sabrina Nicole. She weighed 7 pounds, 11 ounces and was 19 1/2 inches long. Proud grandparents are Andy and Sabina Archuleta of Pagosa Springs, and Salvador and Carmen Dominguez of Chihuahua, Mexico.


Staff Sgt. West Jackson is returning home to Pagosa Springs with his wife, Sarah, and their son, Peyton. West has served his country in the Air Force for six years, with two deployments. Welcoming them home are his parents, Carolyn Clark and Jerry and Kathy Jackson, as well as an extended family of aunts, uncles, cousins and grandparents, all of Pagosa Springs.


LIBRARY NEWS

Save the dates for Pagosa Reads! events

By Carole Howard
SUN columnist, and the library staff

The second year of a highly popular library program called “Pagosa Reads!” is being planned now by coordinator Gail Shepherd, with support from the Alpine Lakes

Book Club.
Theme for this year’s events will be fire, which Shepherd called “another topic of great concern to our community, ranking right up there with last year’s theme of water.”

The two books for this season’s Pagosa Reads! events will be “The Seasons of Fire: Reflections on Fire in the West,” a non-fiction book by wildland firefighter David J. Strohmaier, who shares his views on the formative role that fire plays in human life; and the fictional “Firestorm,” by Nevada Barr, an Anna Pigeon mystery set in Lassen Volcanic National Park after a firestorm. Eight copies of Strohmaier’s book are now available at the library for those of you who want to get a head start on your reading, and extra copies of Barr’s novel are on order.

Shepherd is now soliciting speakers for presentations and discussions at the library relating to the fire theme and these two books, so mark your calendars for 6 p.m. on May 10 and May 17, both Thursdays.

Until then, the Pagosa Reads! banner is being carried by members of the student advisory committee for Meagan’s Place at the library, Meagan’s Place being a special section of the library devoted entirely to books and games of interest to early teens in the sixth through ninth grades.

Sixth-graders Kitman Gill and Kendra Lynnea Schlom and seventh-grader Kyle Anderson wrote a series of book reports in the Pagosa Reads! column in The Preview in February and March. These excellent reviews of books for teens remind us all that many of our young people are not only great readers but also great writers. The teen reviewers hope their book reports inspire their fellow students to read and discuss their favorite books with friends and family. If you missed the reviews, you can find them on the Pagosa Reads! page of the library’s Web site at www.pagosalibrary.org.

Books about inspiring people
“The Measure of a Man” is a spiritual autobiography of Sidney Poitier, a landmark actor who was the first black to win the Academy Award for best actor. It is available in a large-type edition as well as regular print. “Team Moon: How 400,000 People Landed Apollo 11 on the Moon,” by Catherine Thimmesh, tells about the unsung heroes who worked behind the scenes to make the Apollo missions a success. “A Time to Die: The Untold Story of the Kursk Tragedy,” by Robert Moore, tells of the extraordinary courage of the 118 Russian submariners caught in a terrible tragedy.

New non-fiction
In “A Deficit of Decency,” New York Times best-selling author Zell Miller’s writes about today’s deficit of the spiritual truths like faith, family, country and values that made the U.S. great for the past 200 years. In “Star Trek: I’m Working on That” William Shatner takes us on a trek from science fiction to science fact to discover the people who are working on the future we all will share.

Lifelong Learning
The fifth in our spring series of Lifelong Learning lectures takes place this Saturday, March 31, when Glen E. Rodey speaks on “The power of belief: Not to be confused with the facts,” on how humans develop worldviews, faith, political views and other beliefs in everyday life. Please visit the library’s Web site at www.pagosalibrary.org and click on the Lifelong Learning Program page for details of the full Spring 2007 lecture series. All are free to the public. They take place in the library at 3 p.m. on Saturdays.

Thanks to our donors
Our thanks this week for gifts of books and materials from Phyllis Alspach, Carman Booz, Cary Brown, Peggy E. Cotton, Stan Church, Marti Gallo, Nancy Green, Elizabeth Einig, Donna Hallford, Dave Krueger, Robert McClatchie, Lianne Richey, Cathy Rutherford, Cate Smock, Bill Stewart, Margaret Wilson and Carol Young.



Get Caught In The Act
… Of Reading!

What are you reading now?
“America: A Citizens Guide to Democracy Inaction,” by Jon Stewart.
This is a very funny take on the U.S. political system. I’m enjoying the way it is laid out like an old school textbook, you can dip into it, reading a snippet at a time. One of my favorites in the book is called “Unelectable Founding Fathers.”

Name a favorite book as a child
A favorite was “Henry and Beezus,” by Beverly Cleary. I also look back at “Fahrenheit 451,” by Ray Bradbury as making a strong impression on me.

Name a book you couldn’t put down as an adult
“The Sparrow,” by Mary Doria Russell. This book was powerful. Set in the future, it questions all that we believe about what is moral and immoral. I am a Sci Fi fan, but I also enjoy history.

Do you have a library card?
Yes, but to be honest I haven’t used it much lately. I have been buying a lot of books, especially for my kids when I travel for business.

Editor’s note: We reprint Jeff Greer’s comments, this time in their entirety, with our apologies for the omissions and errors in our first attempt.

SENIOR NEWS

Allergy and asthma prevention

By Jeni Middendorf
SUN Columnist

Asthma is one of our nation’s most common chronic health conditions and is on the rise. It can start in childhood, resolve, recur or develop in adulthood.

Many people have both asthma and allergies. Unlike an allergy, asthma is an inflammatory disease of the lung. Since your nose connects to your lung, the inflammatory process can occur along the entire airway. Once the airway begins to swell, breathing becomes difficult. Asthmatics are often short of breath and have a feeling of tightness in the chest. All asthmatics should be under a doctor’s care to manage their disease, to keep it under control and to keep them healthy. If you have an asthma attack, remember the following: Don’t panic; breathe deep, slow and easy; rest; take your prescribed asthma medication; call for help; and get to a doctor.

The best way to prevent an allergy is to recognize that you have one. Often people confuse an allergy with a cold or flu. Remember colds are short-lived and passed from person to person, whereas allergies are immune system reactions to normally harmless substances. Allergies are best prevented by avoiding exposure to allergens in the first place. A good first step to avoiding allergens is to follow the various preventative strategies outlined for each allergen or irritant. Signs of an allergy are: Sneezing, watery eyes or cold symptoms that last more than 10 days without a fever; repeated ear and sinus infections; loss of smell or taste; frequent throat clearing, hoarseness, coughing or wheezing; dark circles under the eyes caused by increased blood flow near the sinuses (allergic shines); and a crease just above the tip of the nose from constant upward nose wiping (allergic salute).

House dust is a component of who you are. House dust is not just dirt but a mixture of potentially allergenic materials, such as fibers; food particles; mold spores; pollens; dust mites; plant and insect parts; hair, animal fur and feathers; dried saliva and urine from pets; and flakes of human and animal skin. The more time you spend indoors, particularly in the fall and winter, the greater your exposure to house dust allergens. Preventive strategies fro house allergens are as follows:

Dust rooms thoroughly with a damp cloth at least once a week. Wear protective gloves and a dust mask while cleaning to reduce exposure to dust and cleaning irritants. Use electric and hot water radiant heaters to provide a cleaner source of heat than “blown air” systems. Reduce the number of stuffed animals, wicker baskets, dried flowers and other dust collectors around the house. Replace heavy drapes and blinds with washable curtains or shades. Replace carpets with washable scatter rugs or bare floors (wood, tile or linoleum).

Food allergies are also extremely common. Symptoms of a food allergy can be as simple as skin problems (itchiness, rashes or hives) or intestinal troubles (abdominal pain, diarrhea or vomiting), or as dangerous as swelling of the respiratory passages, shortness of breath, fainting or anaphylactic shock. The more common food allergens are egg, milk, shellfish, peanuts, soy and wheat. These foods are often hidden as ingredients in casseroles or desserts. You should be aware of what you are eating, but don’t limit your diet to only a few foods since a well balanced diet is best. Preventive strategies fro food allergies are as follows:

Beware of foods that cause you symptoms; If you have had severe reactions to a food, talk to your doctor about carrying an epinephrine injector. Learn to read food labels carefully. When dining out, ask about the ingredients used in preparing the dish before tasting the food. If you experience symptoms, avoid any further contact with that food item, rinse your mouth and see a doctor.

Another common allergen is grass. As with tree pollen, grass pollen is regional as well as seasonal. In addition, grass pollen levels can be affected by temperature, time of day and rain. Of the 1,200 species of grass that grow in North America, only a small percentage of these cause allergies.

Many people think animal allergies are caused by the fur or feathers of their pet. In fact, allergies are actually aggravated by proteins secreted by oil glands and shed as dander; proteins in saliva (which stick to fur when animals lick themselves); and aerosolized urine from rodents and guinea pigs. Keep in mind that you can sneeze with and without your pet being present. Although an animal may be out of sight, their allergens are not. This is because pet allergens are carried on very small particles. As a result, pet allergens can remain circulating in the air and remain on carpets and furniture for weeks and months after a pet is gone. Preventive strategies: Remove pets from your home if possible; if pet removal is not possible, keep them out of bedrooms and confined to areas without carpets or upholstered furniture; wear a dust mask and gloves when near rodents; after playing with your pet, wash your hands and clean your clothes to remove pet allergens; avoid contact with soiled litter cages; and Dust often with a damp cloth.

Ragweed and other weeds such as curly dock, lambs quarters, pigweed, plantain, sheep sorrel and sagebrush are some of the most prolific producers of pollen allergens. Although the ragweed pollen season runs from August to November, ragweed pollen levels usually peak in mid September in many areas in the country. In addition, pollen counts are highest between 5 and 10 a.m. and on dry, hot and windy days. Avoid the outdoors 5-10 a.m.. Save outside activities for late afternoon or after a heavy rain, when pollen levels are lower; Keep windows in your home and car closed to lower exposure to pollen. To keep cool, use air conditioners and avoid using window and attic fans; Be aware that pollen can also be transported indoors on people and pets. Dry your clothes in an automatic dryer rather than hanging them outside, otherwise pollen can collect on clothing and be carried indoors.

Cockroaches are one of the most common and allergenic of indoor pests. Recent studies have found a strong association between the presence of cockroaches and increases in the severity of asthma symptoms in individuals who are sensitive to cockroach allergens. These pests are common even in the cleanest of crowded urban areas and older dwellings. They are found in all types of neighborhoods. The proteins found in cockroach saliva are particularly allergenic but the body and droppings of cockroaches also contain allergenic proteins.

Pollen allergy (hay fever or allergic rhinitis) affects an estimated 10% or 26 million Americans, not including those with asthma. Allergic rhinitis is the reason for 9.2 million office visits to physicians yearly. The estimated overall costs of hay fever in the United States in 1990 totaled $1.8 billion.

For more information contact the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention at (888) 232-4674 or visit www.cdc.gov

Benefits of walking sticks
Walking sticks (also called hiking poles) are common in Europe, especially in Switzerland and Austria, where you’ll often see older adults moving briskly over alpine hillsides, walking sticks firmly in hand.

Now, they’re catching on in the U.S., as they are quite useful and provide more of a workout than you would otherwise get. In the first place, the sticks help to support your knees and back when you’re hiking or walking. If you have joint or knee problems, sticks can help by distributing your weight more evenly and giving you more stability. They also make uphill climbs easier and improve your hiking form by helping to keep your momentum forward, with your chest and arms out in front.

You’ll burn 20 to 25 percent more calories per walk as a result of putting your upper body muscles to work with the use of a stick.

Bagpipes are playin’
Join Jim Dorian in our lounge at 12:45 p.m. Friday, March 30, for a Scottish treat. Jim will share information on the Scottish attire and the mechanics of the bagpipes, along with playing a few tunes on the pipes.

Home-delivered meal volunteers
The Silver Foxes Den Senior Center is looking for permanent volunteers to deliver meals, and is also seeking substitute volunteers for the home-delivered meal program. If you can spare an hour a week and want to contribute to your community, this is the volunteer position for you. You can make a difference in many lives just by volunteering to deliver meals, without taking too much time out of your busy schedule. Call Musetta at 264-2167 if you are interested in helping out. Deliver a meal and a smile and make someone’s day a little brighter.

Front desk volunteers
The Den is also looking for volunteers to work at the front desk one day a week, 9 a.m.- 1 p.m. Personality and people skills are musts! This volunteer is responsible for answering phones, greeting people, checking them in during the lunch hour and other needed tasks. Call Musetta at 264-2167 if you would like to volunteer in a friendly upbeat atmosphere, meet new people and help out at the Senior Center.

Birthday celebrations
If you are age 60-plus and your birthday is in March, come to The Den on Friday, March 30, for lunch and celebrate your birthday. Seniors, Inc. has graciously agreed to pay for a portion of your birthday meal, so it will only cost $1 for a great lunch and lots of fun. Remember to let us know it is your birthday when you check in at the desk.

Soup cooking classes
Due to scheduling conflicts we have new class dates for Isabel’s Restaurant and Dionigi’s Italian Café. You’ll learn some great new soup recipes from two of the best chefs in town.

Dionigi’s will provide soup class 10 a.m.-noon Monday, April. The Isabel’s class will be held 10-noon Monday, April 16.

Classes will be held in the community center kitchen just down the hall from The Den . Each class is limited to 10 participants and they fill up quickly. The cost per class is just $5, which must be paid at the time of sign-up. Meet in the Den’s dining room and bring your appetite, as you’ll be enjoying your new creation at the end of each class.

Spring holiday party
Here comes Peter Cotton Tail, hopping down the bunny trail .. hippety, hoppety, look at Peter go!

Hop on down to The Den Friday, April 6, for lunch and see what treats Peter leaves behind for you. There will be Easter eggs, chocolates, prizes and fun for all. It is also Spring Hat Day and there will be a prize for the most creative spring hat.

Who says that holidays are just for kids? At The Den, every holiday is a chance to have a party, so join us for the laughs and a celebration for the young at heart.

9 Health Fair
The Den will be at the annual 9 Health Fair at the high school Saturday, April 7, from 8 a.m. to noon.

A wide variety of medical screenings will be available, such as a blood chemistry analysis for only $30 a prostate screening using a blood test for $25 and a colon cancer screening kit for $5. Remember, if you are going to do the blood chemistry analysis, you need to fast for at least 12 hours prior to your blood test.

There will also be plenty of other free screenings such as blood pressure checks, eye exams, hearing exams, and lung capacity checks. Other useful information will be available at the diverse selection of booths and make sure you stop by The Den’s booth to say hello. We will have freebees and a Medicare counselor will be available to answer questions.

A few free vouchers may be available for those who cannot afford the blood chemistry fees, call The Den for more information.

Attending the 9Health Fair is a great way to get an overall checkup and visit with friends in the process. We hope you join us for the healthiest event of the year.

Archuleta Roots Day
Archuleta Roots Day is for those folks who have grown up in Archuleta County and claim their roots are here. Twelve folks attended the last Archuleta Roots Day where they talked about the first time they visited the hot springs, which was just a large hot pool of water at that time. Ray Martinez remembers going there with his dad when he was about 10 years old. Others talked about riding a horse to school or taking a very long walk on Trujillo Road to get to school.

The next Archuleta Roots gathering will be in June and the group plans on bringing in some of their favorite old-time photos. They will try and guess who’s who in those photos and The Den will have prizes for each correct guess. Anyone over the age of 55 is welcome to join if their roots are here in Archuleta County. We look forward to seeing you and hearing your stories.

Dance For Health
“Dance For Health” classes are available at The Den Wednesdays at 10 a.m. free of charge. Karma Raley, the instructor, enjoys sharing her love of dance and blends dance with yoga awareness to create a full body routine. Wear loose comfortable clothing and bring a mat or towel. Join us at The Den and learn great dance techniques while having a fun time exercising!

Aikido classes
Aikido is a relatively modern martial art, although its roots go back nearly a thousand years to secret techniques of samurai warriors. The Den offers Aikido classes every Wednesday at 1 p.m. with instructors Bill Trimarco and Lisa Jensen. Aikido is beneficial for health, coordination, stress relief and character with the goal of bettering oneself rather than trying to be better than an opponent.

Seniors Inc.
Seniors Inc. annual memberships for folks 55 and older are being sold at The Den for $5 Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Fridays, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Memberships will not be sold Thursdays.

Your Seniors Inc. membership entitles you to a variety of discounts from participating merchants. For qualifying members, it provides scholarships to assist with the costs for eyeglasses, hearing aids, dental expenses and prescription and medical equipment. Your Seniors Inc. membership will also cover $20 of the $30 transportation fee for medical shuttles to Durango. The Den’s Monthly Mystery trips to fascinating destinations are sponsored by Seniors Inc. so these cool trips in the warmer months are open to all members.

As you can see, the benefits of a Seniors Inc. membership are endless, so stop in at The Den during the scheduled hours to renew or purchase your first membership. Please remember that you do not need to be a Seniors Inc. member to join us at The Den. Everyone is welcome to be a part of our extended family.

Activities
Thursday, March 29 — Tax Aide in Pagosa, by appointment only. The Den is closed.
Friday, March 30 — The Geezers meeting, 9 a.m.; gym walk, 11:15 a.m.; $1 birthday lunches, noon; Bridge-4-Fun, 12:30 p.m.; duplicate bridge, 12:30 p.m.; bagpipes, 12:45 p.m.
Monday, April 2 — Soup class, 10 a.m.-noon; Susan Stoffer, nurse and counselor, available 11 a.m.-1 p.m.; gym walk, 11:15; Bridge-4-Fun, 12:30; canasta, 1 p.m.
Tuesday, April 3 — Gym walk, 11:15 a.m.; blood pressure checks, 11:30 a.m.
Wednesday, April 4  — Nails with Dru, 9:30-11 a.m.; Dance For Health class, 10 a.m.; Aikido class, 1 p.m.
Thursday, April 5 — Lunch served in Arboles (reservations required). Tax Aide in Pagosa, by appointment only. The Den is closed.
Friday, April 6 — The Geezers meeting, 9 a.m.; gym walk, 11:15 a.m.; spring party and Spring Hat Day, noon; veterans’ services, noon; Bridge-4-Fun, 12:30 p.m.; duplicate bridge, 12:30 p.m.; The Den closes at 1 p.m. for Good Friday.

Menu
Suggested donation $3 for ages 60-plus and kids 12 and under; all others $5.
Our meal program is partially funded through the Older Americans Act, United Way, other contributions and grants.
Salad bar available every day at The Den beginning at 11:30 a.m. Menu subject to change.
Friday, March 30 — Lemon baked fish fillet, rice pilaf, mixed vegetables, tropical fruit, and bran muffin.
Monday, April 2 — Chicken and noodles, green beans, yellow squash, mixed fruit, and whole wheat bread.
Tuesday, April 3 — Beef stew with vegetables, cilantro black beans, Cole slaw, orange wedges, and corn bread.
Wednesday, April 4 — Scalloped potatoes with ham and cheese, vegetable medley, peaches, and whole wheat bread.
Thursday, April 5 — Lunch served in Arboles (reservations required.)
Friday, April 6 — Salmon patties with cream gravy, steamed rice, mixed vegetables, apricots, and whole wheat bread.

EXTENSION VIEWPOINTS

Growing potatoes in your home garden

By Bill Nobles
PREVIEW Columnist

Friday, March 30 — 1:45 p.m., 4-H Fridays at Community United Methodist Church.
Friday, March 30 — 2 p.m., Rabbit project meeting.
Friday, March 30 — 3:30 p.m., Poultry project meeting.
Monday, April 2 — 4 p.m. Advanced Entomology project meeting.
Monday, April 2 — 4 p.m. Shooting Sports project meeting at Ski & Bow Rack.
Monday, April 2 — 6:30 p.m., Livestock Committee meeting. Tuesday, April 3 — 9 a.m., Master Gardener.
Tuesday, April 3 — 6:30 p.m., Colorado Kids Club meeting.
Thursday, April 5 — 5:30 p.m., Vet Science project meeting, San Juan Veterinary Hospital.
Thursday, April 5 — 6:30 p.m., Shady Pine Club meeting.
Friday, April 6 — Office closed at noon.

Seed potatoes
The Archuleta County Extension Office is taking orders for seed potatoes.
There will be two kinds available: Sangre (red) and Yukon Gold (white). Currently we are charging 40 cents per pound for both species.

For those of you who are just starting out and are experimenting, we suggest you order two to three pounds of each species, instead of ordering a whole lot of them. This way, you can experiment and see if you like them and then order more next year.

When orders arrive at the Extension Office, each person will be contacted to pick up their order. If you are interested in ordering seed potatoes, call 264-2388, e-mail us at archulet@ ext.colostate.edu or stop by the Extension Office. Orders should be available the second week of May.

Growing potatoes in your garden
Potato production can be an enjoyable and rewarding experience for the home Gardener.

Few vegetables yield more food per square foot than the potato. A 100 foot row can yield more than 200 pounds of potatoes.

The average potato provides 40 percent of the recommended daily allowance for vitamin C, has 3 grams of protein, is an excellent source of dietary fiber, and furnishes 12 other essential vitamins and minerals — all with no fat. Potatoes add diversity, versatility and convenience to menus. Skin color does not determine a potato’s use, its texture does. Potatoes that are high in starch or dry matter are more mealy. They tend to bake up nicely and make good fries and chips. Those low in starch are waxier and often higher in sugar. These varieties hold together better during boiling and are best used for salads, soups and similar dishes. The two species available through the Extension Office are Yukon Gold and Sangre.

• Yukon Gold potatoes have an oblong tuber shape with buff skin and yellow flesh. They tend to be high yielding and are used for baking, mashing and roasting. Yukon Gold’s generally have an attractive appearance and a good flavor which make them suitable for many culinary uses.

• Sangre potatoes are a round type tuber with dark red skin. They tend to be high yielding and are used mostly for baking, boiling, and for salads. The Sangre was developed in Colorado. They may emerge erratically and tend to develop a slight net in some soils. Sangre’s store well and have excellent cooking quality.

Plant potatoes up to two weeks earlier than the average date of the last spring frost. The average date of the last spring frost usually lies between June 15-20. The soil temperature should be 45 degrees or warmer. Potatoes prefer a sandy to sandy loam soil. Till the soil to a depth of 16 inches and pre-irrigate the soil until moist. You need about 15 pounds of seed for each 100 feet of row.

Plant potatoes in rows 30 to 36 inches apart. Space seed pieces within the row at 10 to 12 inches at a depth of about 4 inches. Hills may be formed at the time of planting or in the following four weeks. Hilling provides more space for the developing tubers to grow and helps prevent green potatoes. It is a good idea to rotate spots in the garden for potato production. Planting in the same area year after year may lead to disease and insect problems. Keep soil moist but not wet. Potatoes require abundant oxygen and do not flourish in compacted soils. Generally, potatoes have a shallow root system. Most moisture is taken up from the top foot of soil. Be particularly careful to avoid over watering during the first weeks after planting. After plants have emerged, irrigate every three to five days, thoroughly wetting the soil to a depth of about 2 feet.

Treat insect pests with insecticides or, for those preferring organic controls, with insecticidal soaps. Common insects in home gardens include aphids, flea beetles, psyllids and, in some areas, Colorado potato beetles. Potato diseases may be seed-borne or acquired during the growing season. Many diseases can be avoided by using certified seed. Remove plants that are small, yellowing and sickly. Commonly encountered diseases in the garden include scab, early blight, pink rot and black scurf.

Plants mature and begin to die about 70 to 100 days after planting, depending upon variety. As plants mature, they use less water. To promote skin set, leave tubers in the ground for 10 to 21 days following vine death. This decreases bruising during harvest and permits better storage. Harvest when the soil temperature is 50 to 65 degrees. Store potatoes in a cool, dark and humid place. Air circulation through the pile of potatoes is desirable. Potato tubers are living, breathing vegetables. Storage sites are not potato “hospitals” but rather “hotels.” Potato quality does not improve with storage. Proper care at harvest can prevent many storage related problems. Cure the tubers at 50 to 60 degrees for two to three weeks, and then cool to the desired storage temperature. Most gardeners store their crop at 38 to 45 degrees and 90 percent or higher humidity. Do not allow condensation to form on tuber surfaces — it may lead to rot problems. Tubers stored in this manner will not sprout for approximately three months. Do not store potatoes with fruit. Apples, for instance, give off a growth-regulating gas, ethylene, which promotes sprouting of potato tubers.

Contact the Extension Office at 264-5931 for more information concerning planting potatoes.

VETERANS CORNER