Front Page

August 3, 2000

Lightning strikes rake county

By Karl Isberg

The fire watch continued in Archuleta County as lightning strikes ignited 19 small blazes July 26 and Aug. 2 .

A prevailing storm pattern produced electrical activity during the afternoon and evening hours nearly every day during the week and dry conditions continued to plague the region.

According to Diane Fryar of the Pagosa Fire Protection District, PFPD firefighters responded to seven small blazes during the week-long period.

On July 27 a crew extinguished a fire on Easy Street, in the Continental Estates subdivision southeast of Pagosa Springs.

Lightning strikes started fires July 29 near the old Job Corps site on Piedra Road and on Paciente Place, in the Meadows subdivision west of town.

PFPD crews responded to three fires on Aug. 1: on Light Plant Road south of the Pagosa Springs town boundary; on Trujillo Road and on ranch land east of U.S. 84 near Pagosa Springs.

Rick Jewell of the U.S. Forest Service said his agency's fire crews worked on 13 fires during the period in question.

Jewell said USFS firefighters fought small blazes in the Spiler Canyon area south of Pagosa Springs, as well as in the nearby Valle Seco area. There were also fires near Hell's Canyon and on private land in Chromo at the southeast corner of the county.

Jewell said all the fires fought last week by USFS crews remained under one acre in size.

Aug. 1 was a peak day as USFS firefighters were called to three fires.

A quarter-acre blaze erupted on the west side of Eight Mile Mesa, south of Pagosa Springs. The fire was on private land and residents of the area did some fire line work prior to the arrival of the Forest Service crew.

A fire near Benson Creek southeast of Pagosa Springs was contained at a tenth acre, with three firefighters at the scene Aug. 2 to complete the work.

The largest fire was near Willow Draw, east of town between Fawn Gulch and Mill Creek roads. The blaze burned an area one acre in size before it was contained, and four USFS firefighters were mopping up at the scene on Aug. 2.

Jewell said the Pagosa Ranger district has responded to 46 fires this summer, the largest being 10 acres.

"When we're called," said Jewell, "we send a three-person engine crew for the initial work. If they need help, they call for it. Some of the fires this past week required as many as six firefighters. We've used helicopter water drops on the majority of the fires, with two drops on many of them."

Jewell said a USFS fixed-wing aircraft based at the La Plata County Airport flies over the forest in Archuleta County at least once each day, with a spotter on board looking for fires.

"When we have a lot of lightning strikes," said Jewell, "we will use a night flight with infrared equipment."

If a large or quickly moving fire starts in the area, said Jewell, the USFS has access to several large slurry bombers based at Durango. "There was a fire on Southern Ute land near Pagosa Junction last Friday and Saturday," he said. "One of our guys on a flight spotted the smoke and called in the tankers. They flew several missions and hit the fire to slow it down before firefighters could get to the scene. If we need the tankers on Forest land, they are available."

 

Traffic light installation underway

By Karl Isberg

It's an event that has occurred only once before in the history of Pagosa Springs.

The installation of a traffic signal.

Crews began work Wednesday to install three light poles, mast arms and signal lights at the intersection of U.S. 160 with Lewis and South 5th streets, in downtown Pagosa Springs. Work on the poles was to be complete by week's end with signal lights due for delivery and installation by Aug. 11.

Cost of the project is being shared by the Town of Pagosa Springs and the Colorado Department of Transportation.

CDOT contributed $90,000 to the project, with the town providing the balance of $280,000. The overall project included recent reconstruction of the three-way intersection of U.S. 160 and Lewis and 5th Streets on the north side of the highway.

General contractor for work on the signal light project is Strohecker Excavation and Paving of Bayfield. C &D Electric of Alamosa is installing the signal lights.

Timing of signal lights at the intersection will be controlled by video sensors. The presence of traffic on Lewis Street and 5th Street south of the highway will key a signal change. A left-turn arrow will be in place for eastbound highway traffic turning on to Lewis Street.

Whether or not a third signal light will be installed within town boundaries anytime soon is a question being asked by town and county officials.

Plans are in the works for CDOT to modify the intersection of U.S. 160 at Piedra Road, but the state agency has not been forthcoming with specific dates. Work at the intersection includes improvement of the right-turn lane from the westbound highway to Piedra Road and installation of a traffic signal at what has become one of the most dangerous intersections in the county.

Pagosa Springs Town Administrator Jay Harrington told town trustees Aug. 1 he received a copy of letter from CDOT to Archuleta County Manager Dennis Hunt concerning the project. The letter was clear regarding what CDOT wants the town and county to do as part of the effort at the intersection, but did not include pertinent information - such as when the state plans to begin work.

Archuleta County and the Town of Pagosa Springs intend to reroute Eagle Drive - the frontage road next to U.S. 160 - moving its intersection with Piedra Road north of its present location.

CDOT Regional Transportation Director Richard Reynolds told Hunt CDOT is "in the process of preliminary design for the Piedra Road/U.S. 160 intersection project," and expressed the agency's appreciation for the work being done by town and county "with respect to the relocation of Eagle Drive."

Reynolds then told Hunt that CDOT has $4 million per year available in the region for intersection projects - 35 of which are currently on a prioritized list.

"With the present costs of design, right-of-way acquisition, and construction, a serious shortfall exists in funding for these projects," wrote Reynolds. "Unfortunately, this requires that we must limit our participation in funding to those elements within our highway system and rely upon local entities and developers to fund additional improvements outside the highway right-of-way limits."

Reynolds went on to point out that the present intersection of the highway with Eagle Drive, located several yards north of the highway, "will result in vehicle conflicts once a traffic signal is installed at the Piedra Road/U.S. 160 intersection." This statement should come as no surprise to town and county officials, who have long planned to relocate the intersection.

"We expect these conflicts to be extensive, and an unsafe intersection would result without the closure of Eagle Drive" wrote Reynolds. "We cannot signalize the intersection without a relocation of Eagle Drive." The Director continued ". . . it may be possible for the Town and/or the County to close the present intersection of Eagle Drive and Piedra Road at the time the signal is installed. We feel adequate access will still be provided to U.S. 160 by the present intersection of Eagle Drive and U.S. 160 located to the east of the Piedra Road/U.S. 160 intersection (at Trinity Lane)."

Harrington told town trustees about the letter from Reynolds at an Aug. 1 meeting of the board.

"We don't see the logic of it," said Harrington. "We need a timing point, so we can negotiate right-of-way issues and set a schedule for our work on a new intersection for Eagle Drive. Dealing with CDOT has been frustrating, The money has been budgeted and they are playing hardball."

Harrington said an Aug. 8 meeting with CDOT officials has been been scheduled in Durango. Harrington, town trustee Bill Whitbred and county representatives will attend the meeting and attempt to secure clarification from the state agency.

 

PLPOA will seek new financial services pact

By Richard Walter

Obviously upset about the existing Colorado Management Association contract for Pagosa Lakes Property Owners Association financial services, members walked a convoluted path Saturday to initiate action that might replace the firm.

It all started innocently enough when Gene Cortright, as lead-off speaker in the public comment portion of the annual meeting said, "I have heard repeated criticism of the CMA contract and move that board, no later than its regular September meeting, place this contract out for public bidding."

The motion was seconded by Perry Hanson.

Richard Manley, acting president for the meeting, said he'd call for discussion, "but I have to caution that existing contractual language may be subject to legal scrutiny and resolution."

Before any action could be called on the motion, however, Dallas Johnson was recognized and (with Charles Hawkins reading the document) offered a lengthy resolution to replace the original motion. It cited lack of access to association records which are kept by CMA in Littleton, the $10,600 or more cost per month and the recently initiated $50 transaction fee for every property transfer as reasons for revocation of the contract.

Manley noted, in answer to an audience question, the existing contract expires on Dec. 31 this year. A legal determination would be necessary, he said, "to determine if we could cancel that contract." Another person said the contract requires 90-day notification if it is not to be renewed.

Others argued the association's own computers and software are adequate - with proper programming - to handle the service in-house. One member of the audience said two or three persons could be hired to manage the system at a cost of less than the amount CMA is receiving.

Richard Akin responded with the feeling the motion was unclear, that the in-house equipment might not be adequate, and said doing it that way "asks us to ignore other alternatives, like competitive bidding."

Manley told the audience, "The membership can guide leadership in handling of their money. We would prefer the latitude to go in-house or to bid, whichever is most cost effective."

When asked by another member of the audience what it would cost for management, equipment, supplies, etc., no one was sure.

General Manager Walt Lukasik said such figures are not available.

Hawkins said the computer and software already are on hand. "Before this contract," he said, "we had a system that was the envy of others. I feel we can replace the contract and go back to in-house operation with existing hardware and be functional in a short time for much less than we now pay CMA."

The final result of more than an hour of debate on the subject was adoption of an amendment to Johnson's resolution, then the adoption of the resolution itself, which, as worded, eliminated the original motion by Cortright without it ever coming to a vote.

The decision, in effect, authorizes the board of directors to seek bids for outside financial services and to come up with a cost projection on what the services would cost if performed in-house.

Lukasik said the board will be given the alternative to choose whichever system will cost the least for property owners.

Specifically included in the approved decision, at the insistence of Manley, were the words "qualitative and quantitative" as bases for determining degree of service each proposal represents.

When asked by an audience member what this requires of the board, Manley said the membership decision "becomes your direction to the board. We will put it into the process and the general manager will implement it."

Asked if the action would preclude the Littleton firm from bidding, Manley said it would not, "unless legal advice indicated there were some reason to exclude them for cause."

The decision to seek bids was approved by voice vote with one "nay" heard.

In other recommendations:

- Richard Akin asked the board to consider reinstitution of periodic town hall-type meetings (perhaps quarterly) to "give the people a chance to give you their feedback on issues outside the regular board meetings."

- Ron Clodfelter, who served as parliamentarian for the meeting, urged the membership and board of directors to consider adoption of a Code of Ethics, citing repeated resignations of elected members and the necessity of appointments to replace them. Mojie Adler, a former director, said the Rules Committee, several years ago, developed a code for the board and all committees but it was never brought up for adoption. Dahrl Henley, current Rules chairman, asked for copies of that code and was told they would be provided.

- Dennis Ford asked the board to look into the work on North Pagosa Boulevard which "already is deteriorating less than a year after it was completed. The shoulder work was improper and should never have been accepted." Later, in a committee report, Bill Ralston agreed there are problems on North Pagosa and said "the county engineer made a conscious decision to accept the work because there was no money available for 8 inches of new rock and 4 inches of small rock base. Truck traffic is basically responsible and the county plans to repair the soft spots."

 

State transportation plan hearing here Monday

Pagosa area residents will get an opportunity Monday to review and comment on the Colorado Department of Transportation's 2020 Statewide Transportation Plan.

DOT officials will host a public meeting from 5 to 7 p.m. in the county commissioner meeting room in the Archuleta County Courthouse.

The plan, which covers fiscal years 2001-20, reportedly identifies projected revenues, programs and proposed transportation projects scheduled for the next 20 years. The draft plan takes into account multiple modes of travel, socioeconomic projections and environmental considerations. It was developed with local, regional and state input from within CDOT's 15 transportation planning regions.

"Input from the community is critical to the success of the statewide plan," said Tom Norton, CDOT Executive director. "We want to be sure we are doing everything possible to meet the transportation needs across this state. We can't do that if we don't have a clear understanding of what those needs are."

Copies of the draft statewide plan are reportedly available for review at the county clerk's office, the Ruby Sisson Memorial Library, CDOT regional office in Durango and the CDOT's Web site.

For more information, contact CDOT at (303) 757-9266.

 

Commission hopefuls answer our questions

By John M. Motter

The names of 10 Republican candidates for Archuleta County commissioner are on next Tuesday's primary election ballot. One Democrat has also entered the race. By the time the ballots are counted, unless there is a protest, the only survivors will be two Republicans and the lone Democrat.

One Republican will be chosen from commissioner District 1, one Democrat from commissioner District 2, and the Democrat from commissioner District 2. The Democrat advances because he has no opposition.

Even though the candidates live in separate commissioner districts, qualified voters from any part of the county can vote for candidates in both districts. The vote is countywide.

Republican candidates from District 1 are William M. (Bill) Downey, Nan Rowe, Patrick Horning, Julia A. Donoho, and Michael C. Branch. Republican candidates from District 2 are Alden Ecker, Jim Willingham, Ralph Goulds, Ken Fox, and John Feazel.

J.B. Smith is the lone Democrat in the race and a candidate for commissioner in District 2. He was not interviewed in connection with the Tuesday primary because he has no opposition and automatically advances to the November ballot.

This week The SUN asked the Republican candidates five questions pertinent to campaign issues. The questions were crafted by the entire SUN editorial staff. Each candidate was asked the same five questions and none saw the questions before the interview. The SUN thanks each candidate for submitting to the interview.

The questions are 1. How would you reconcile conflicts between individual and group rights inherent in land use regulations? 2. What will be your approach to county road maintenance? 3. What is the relationship between county commissioner and the operation of departments headed by other elected officials? How do you feel about an individual commissioner giving directions to a county employee, such as a road and bridge truck driver, etc.? 5. What do you think is the most important issue facing the county and how would you mitigate the problems created?

Candidate answers are listed in alphabetical order and separated according to the commissioner district. Only the question number is listed following the candidate name to avoid endlessly repeating the questions.

Commissioner District 1

William M. (Bill) Downey.

1. Through the current conditional use permitting process, mitigation of adverse impacts is required. If adverse impacts cannot be mitigated, the conditional use permit should not be issued. If a government action reduces the value of property, the government should reimburse the owner for the property loss. There are some case-specific incidents involving public health, safety, and welfare in which private rights might need to be placed lower than group rights. Satisfaction of public health, safety, and welfare needs are not a 'taking.' Any other governmental appropriation of private rights might be a taking.

2. I have for several months been working on a plan for the county getting away from maintenance of subdivision roads as much as we can. We've been getting traffic counts. If future maintenance is conducted by a metropolitan district or property owner's association, they could use their own equipment or hire a private contractor. The county should give them a proportionate share of HUTF state funds plus additional funds. I am working on a distribution formula which will not be based on road miles, but on use miles. We might have to raise the county road and bridge mill levy. I supported the last attempt to raise the mill levy.

3. We approve and allocate the county budget. We should not tell another elected official's employee what to do. All elected officials are on an equal basis. We are having elected official and department head meetings in order to improve relationships among the departments.

4. I think it creates a breakdown in the chain of command, confuses employees, and is not appropriate.

5. In a word - growth and the impacts created by growth. Over the last few years, we've had an 8 to 8-1/2 percent population increase while facing a state revenue cap of 5-1/2 percent year. We're losing ground at the rate of 2-1/2 to 3 percent a year. A good solution would be overhauling the state tax structure. I can't do that. My philosophy on the road plan will help in this area. There are no easy solutions for complex circumstance. I don't want a tax increase any more than anyone else, but in order to provide services for more people it takes more money. Where that comes from I'm not sure.

Nan Rowe

1. There will always be conflict between individual and group rights. As more people move in and we get a denser population there will be more conflict. My first step will be to hold public hearings - we need to involve the public. We're doing some of that now. There has to be a balance. Public input is needed to discover where that balance is.

2. Impact fees on new developers. In addition, already platted or 35-acre-plus developments are exempt from impact fees. I'd try to get these exemptions repealed working through state representatives and senators. I don't think there is enough money left without these exemptions.

3. As far as I'm concerned, those other elected officials and their departments do not work for the county commissioners or the county manager. They work for the people who elected them. The only control the county commissioners have over other elected officials is determining the size of those elected officials' budgets.

4. An individual county commissioner should not give directions to any county employee other than through the top administrative employee of that department. Individual commissioners do have a right and responsibility to speak to county employees.

5. Growth is definitely the most important issue. In terms of county government responsibility, my three priorities are growth, road maintenance, and law enforcement problems. Population growth is creating most of the other problems. My solution will be to engage more of the public in a discussion to develop a countywide growth plan. I will get the public involved in county commissioner meetings by making the meetings less boring. Current meetings are 99 percent filled with minutiae. I would handle this routine material in a public, morning meeting just as now. I would deal with larger issues during evening public meetings. I would also like to see a regular, public information column in the newspaper explaining issues and even containing advocacy. It would raise the profile of the commissioners and their duties.

Patrick Horning

1. By adopting rules for land use in the county, we would eliminate those conflicts. People would know when they buy land how it can be used. Without rules, anyone can do what they want with their own property.

2. In the long term, we should not construct or adopt roads we cannot properly maintain. In the short term, for roads already adopted by the county, we need to bring them up to standard. It is possible to construct and repair roads in such a way that they don't require frequent, repetitive maintenance. That is what I would see done.

3. The relationship is, the commissioners authorize the budget for other elected officials. I would like to see all of the elected officials and department heads work together as a team to accomplish common goals - the best possible service from the county offices to the people. We need people who jump in and do the work without regard to their position or office.

4. The way it is now it would be wrong. No one commissioner is authorized to oversee any department. Supervision of departments not run by other elected officials should be assigned to specific commissioners. This would allow a department head the opportunity to go to the full board to work out differences in the event of a disagreement with the supervising commissioner.

5. I think the most important issue facing the county at this time is the current governmental structure. I would give county commissioners hands-on control working with the public, instead of having a county manager as a go between. I believe the commissioners' job is to bring everyone together to solve problems regardless of the issues involved.

Julia A. Donoho

1. I have traveled around the state investigating problems and solutions in other counties of similar characteristics and backgrounds, to understand what is down the pike and discover solutions that may work for us. I believe the adoption of a comprehensive plan, defense of water rights, and a 20-year road plan are essential to the future livability of Archuleta County. I have made promises to large land owners to review options before enacting regulations. I will do the same for landowners along highway corridors close to town.

2. We need a 20-year road plan with two, five, and 10 year goals. We need a road priority rating system based on traffic counts and road conditions so everyone knows where their road stands on the list of upgrades and maintenance. That would give us a more consistent road maintenance system throughout the county. I also believe it is important that we require developers to obtain road and grading permits throughout the county, even on 35-acre and larger parcels.

3. The county commissioners are responsible for running the administrative, budgetary, and policy making functions of the county. They oversee twenty different departments and boards, including: road and bridge, building and planning, finance, county fair, social services, personnel, extension services and so forth. They make sure that taxes are collected and paid out according to the budget, and that the departments of other elected officials like sheriff, clerk, assessor, treasurer, coroner, and surveyor are properly funded. The commissioners do not need to be involved in the day to day management of other departments.

4. I believe that should not happen. I believe each of the three commissioners should be assigned two or three boards or departments and have a direct relationship with the heads of those boards or departments. Grievances should be addressed to the personnel administrator. I propose an annual countywide employee meeting and a suggestion box.

5. Growth is the biggest issue, roads second. The problem with roads is related to growth. One of the biggest problems with growth is, the census will say we have a population near 10,000 people. In reality, our summer population is 20,000. We must adopt a comprehensive plan and land use regulations to manage and direct growth. Projections are that we will more than double in the next 10 years, especially in second-home population. We must control sprawl and protect existing residents from escalating taxes caused by the inflation of property values due to growth.

Michael Branch

1. I feel that a reasonable compromise between highest and best use and compatibility with the neighborhood can be obtained if all parties are realistic with their expectations. I propose to consider the merits of each piece of property and its location in order to make a decision as to its best use, a use which may not return the best profit.

2. My approach will be to focus on alternative financing sources to pay for the maintenance needed to keep roads from deteriorating any more than they have. It will take a minimum of $3 million (current budget is $2.8 million) in additional expenditures each year. I have already suggested two sources of additional revenue and will continue to seek input from others as to additional sources. I advocate initiating real estate transfer fees and a sales use tax on building materials purchased outside of the county.

3. The only direct relationship between the commissioners and other elected officials is monetary. The commissioners approve the budgets for each elected official's department. However, all elected officials must work together to effectively provide the services citizens expect.

4. I feel that, generally, commissioners need to observe the chain of command. A department head cannot effectively run his department if other people give him instructions. Also, the staff needs to have one boss.

5. The most important issue facing the county is the combination of roads and growth. These issues are directly related. In regards to roads, the solution is directly related to money. In regards to growth, this is not an issue that you solve. Growth is not necessarily good or bad and will continue in Archuleta County regardless of what a commissioner might personally prefer. The challenge will be to manage growth. There are already regulations in place to regulate growth. As a commissioner, I will see that these regulations address future needs of the county.

Commissioner District 2

Alden Ecker

1. The county has to establish land use rules, zoning if you please. These have to be done with the differences in mind. One size does not fit all. People should determine their own destinies in the areas they live in. I strongly believe each area of Archuleta County should make their own decision on land use. For example, Pagosa Springs should not dictate for Arboles or the other way around.

2. We need desperately to get a long range road program in place that allows us to build roads right the first time. Good roads cost money. Badly built roads cost even more. There are new materials on the market with guarantees that should be used by Archuleta County.

3. A good working relationship. Department heads elected by citizens must run their own departments, but they must have a good relationship with the county commissioners. After all, we're all working for the same goal, we're working for the people. I still believe in government of the people, for the people, and by the people.

4. No, that's not a good idea. One commissioner has no authority outside of the board of commissioners.

5. I think the biggest problem with Archuleta County government is, we need to work together as a team. We cannot afford to become a bureaucratic nightmare for the people we serve. if we all pull together we can solve the issues of roads, growth, and so on as we move into a new area of growth.

Jim Willingham

1. We are adopting a zoning plan. When that is in place it will answer the problems created by the different needs. As the community grows, people can apply for variances if conditions change. All of the adjoining neighbors will have input before a variance is acted on.

2. I would like a one time, 1 percent road upgrade fee on the exchange of real estate. If we had done that last year, we'd have $1 million. You'll never be sent a bill, but if you sell your property there would be a one-time charge as a road upgrade fee.

3. In county government, the board of county commissioners is the highest office. Every other department is under them and reports to them. The state legislature publishes an organization chart showing everyone reporting to county commissioners.

4. First, the commissioners can give information to an employee, but it takes two commissioners to go together. One commissioner does not have the right to do county business by himself. Commissioners should gather information in the field, then discuss and make decisions in public forum.

5. The most important issue is zoning. Resolve that and we'll have a lot of problems solved. I will work to implement zoning.

Ralph Goulds

1. In developing any land use regulations you have to think about property rights and you have to balance the impact on individual property rights against the needs of neighboring properties and the needs of the community as a whole. In developing land use regulations, you need to consider compromise solutions that reflect the desires of the majority while attempting to minimize impacts on individual rights that are compromised in the process.

2. The first step I would take is to study the present operation of road and bridge to determine how effectively our tax money is being used and see if any improvements can be instituted. I would also evaluate road and bridge personnel policies with those of other counties having a similar road situation to see if any improvements can be realized in the process. After that, I would develop a long range plan of road maintenance that will take into account population density, mileage, and prioritize roads for upgrading, consistent with their traffic density. If it then becomes apparent that additional funds for maintenance are required. I would present a specific plan to the voters showing what will be done to what roads and and in what time frame to justify any proposed tax increase. I would envision that all roads meeting county standards will be treated equally.

3. At the present time, I consider it unsatisfactory. By law, the commissioners are charged with appropriating the budgets for other county elected officials. To perform that duty, and at the same time to deal with the needs of the county, both in the present and the future, the commissioners cannot merely dismiss or cut budget requests - not just by saying 'There is not enough money.' Their real function should be to evaluate those budget requests for validity and if the need for additional funds is adequately documented, then the commissioners need to take whatever steps are necessary to obtain the needed funding.

4. I think a commissioner giving direct instructions to county employees is an unacceptable exercise of implied authority. Since the commissioners are only empowered to act as a board, there is an obvious management need for a county administrator to be a point of contact for county department heads who should not be by passed in the direction of their employees. The commissioners must establish sufficient policy direction to the administrators to ensure their desires are properly carried out. They must follow up to ensure that the policies they have set are not misinterpreted.

5. The management of growth is the biggest issue facing the county today. I'm not talking about controlling growth; that cannot be done. To deal with the management of growth we need to finish developing a plan which embodies both short and long term aspects and reflects the views of all of our citizens. Once the plan has been adopted and supporting regulations enacted, we need to ensure that it is followed and not destroyed by the granting of unwarranted exceptions. To achieve the management of growth we need to institute measures now to preclude commercial and other large scale development which would nullify any planning that might be developed.

Ken Fox

1. There is a definite guideline - the 5th amendment of the Constitution of the United States. It says you don't restrict a person's private property right without due process. If there is an overwhelming public need to restrict private property rights, the person should be justly compensated for the loss. Health, safety, and welfare of the people is a responsibility of government and discharge of that responsibility might require invasion of private property rights. We need to have a process in place that satisfies the interests of both of these entities. To the extent that land use regulations represent the wishes of the people, they should be instituted if they do not violate due process. The due process line is not rigid; it should be flexible to fit circumstances.

2. We need to totally re-evaluate existing policy. We now have a moratorium we inherited, we maintain roads we shouldn't that were taken in in the past, and there are roads we don't maintain that we should. Presently, we are doing about one-half of what we should be doing for good maintenance. It doesn't make sense to take on more roads and reduce our effectiveness even more. It's a matter of dollars and sense. If we are to take on additional roads and support the current level of maintenance, we have to get rid of other roads. My solution is to inventory needs, accurately calculate costs, and encourage the development of metropolitan districts for road maintenance. We must also study other funding sources such as an increased mill levy, and implementation of impact fees.

3. The commissioners' responsibility is to establish policy. Once established, it is up to staff to carry it out. The commissioners are responsible for maintaining and operating the county courthouse and for approving and funding the county budget. Good communication is needed with everyone in the courthouse. We have made a lot of progress in that area.

4. The law is specific that the commissioners act as a commission unless an individual commissioner is given responsibility by the board. If directions come from three different sources, the result will lack efficiency, effectiveness, and will be counter productive.

5. The biggest issue facing the county is the same as the biggest issue facing the state - the effects of enormous growth. The solution is that citizen input must be continued. The community survey sends a consistent message. My concern is, are we hearing from the people who have been here for many years? There needs to be a balance between the new and the old. We've made some important steps by hiring a county director of development - a long range planner - and authorizing several surveys. Maybe in the area of communications we need to initiate a newsletter from the commissioners to be run in the SUN.

John Feazel

1. It has to do with just compensation. If someone wants to take something from someone else, they should compensate them. Otherwise, they have nothing to say.

2. I'd put the roads on a priority basis, most used first, and then down the list from there. I'd certainly want to invoke my road plan. Permanent roads in areas most developed. Then there will be less maintenance later. Gravel should be compacted into the surface of gravel roads so both will last longer.

3. Mostly budgetary. They discuss logistics in relation to the budget.

4. If he does that he is out of the chain of command. That's uncalled for because he is sidestepping, undermining the department head's authority.

5. Government sponsored tourism that hasn't paid its own way and which has helped produce an out-of-balance and one-way economy here. Encourage industry to come here. Back away gradually from having the government sponsor tourism. The county should be on the internet so we can tap into ideas from elsewhere without making research party trips. The county web page could be used to attract industry.

 

Inside The Sun

 

Tuesday is V-day for commission candidates

By John M. Motter

Tuesday is the big day for 11 candidates who've been running hither and yon across Archuleta County in an effort to capture votes and win a spot on the board of county commissioners.

Tuesday - from 7 a.m. until 7 p.m. - is primary election day across Colorado. In Archuleta County, the only local names on the ballot are candidates for county commissioner positions in Commissioner District's 1 and 2. When the smoke clears Tuesday, the name of one Republican candidate from District 1, one Republican candidate from District 2, and one Democrat candidate from District 2 will move on for the Nov. 7 general election ballot.

In District 1, the Republican candidates are William M. (Bill) Downey, Nan Rowe, Patrick Horning, Julia A. Donoho, and Michael C. Branch. District 2 Republican candidates are Alden Ecker, Jim Willingham, Ralph Goulds, Ken Fox, and John Feazel. J.B. Smith is the lone Democrat in the race.

Candidates for county commissioner must live in the District in which they are represented on the ballot. Even so, qualified voters from across the county can vote for either or both candidates. The vote for commissioner is countywide. The only stipulation is, voters registered as Republican must vote for Republican candidates and voters registered as Democrats must vote for candidates who are Democrats.

Unaffiliated voters must affiliate with either the Democrat or Republican party in order to vote in the primary election, according to June Madrid, the county election official. Unaffiliated voters can affiliate Tuesday just prior to voting. It is the responsibility of those who affiliate to take steps following the primary to return to their former party status, Madrid said.

Determination of which voting precinct a voter lives in can be made at the polling place, Madrid said, if the voter supplies two personal facts, such as physical address and birth date. Since county voting records are computerized, the two facts can be verified on the computer at the time of voting.

Archuleta County has 7,258 registered voters, according to Madrid. Of that number, 3,930 are Republicans, 1,474 are Democrats, 1,843 are unaffiliated, nine are Green Party, and two Libertarians. Only voters indicating a Democrat or Republican preference can vote in the primary.

Meanwhile, early voting ends tomorrow at 4 p.m.

"The early voting pace has been slower than I expected," Madrid said. "I started early voting sooner than usual this year because I expected a big turnout. If hasn't happened."

By early Tuesday morning, ballots had been cast by 475 Republicans and about 50 Democrats.

In addition to the Archuleta County commissioner race, the following races and candidates are on the primary ballot:

Representative to the 107 U.S. Congress, District 3, Republican Scott McInnis and Democrat Curtis Imrie; secretary of state, two-year term, Donetta Davidson, Republican, Anthony Martinez, Democrat; state board of education at large, Ben L. Alexander, Republican, Sandra Panetta, Republican, and Jared Polis, Democrat; regent of the University of Colorado at large, Pete Steinhauer, Republican, and Burke Beau, Democrat; regent of the University of Colorado Third Congressional District, Republican Hank Anton, Democrat Gail Schwartz; state representative, District 59, Mark Larson, Republican, and Suzanne Garcia, Democrat; district attorney, District 6, Sarah F. Law, Democrat.

Archuleta County polling places are: Precinct 1 - county commissioners meeting room in the county courthouse, Precinct 2 - Methodist Church on Lewis Street, Precinct 3 - Archuleta County Fair Building on U.S. 84, Precinct 4 - Saint Peter's Catholic Church on U.S. 151 in Arboles, Precinct 5 - VFW building on Buttercup Drive in Pagosa Springs, Precinct 6 - New Vista Clubhouse in the Vista subdivision, Precinct 7 - Community Bible Church on Village Drive, Precinct 8 - El Centro Senior Center on South 8th Street.

 

Historical Preservation ordinance approved

By Karl Isberg

Following Aug. 2 action by town trustees, the town of Pagosa Springs has a Historical Preservation ordinance on the books, opening the door to designation of historical landmarks and districts, and to the potential use of state funds for work in the field of historical preservation.

Creation of the ordinance passed was the responsibility of a Historical Preservation Committee formed by town trustees in 1999. The committee includes John Motter, Shari Pierce, Julia Ann Donoho, Glen Raby and Mary Weiss.

The group worked for a year to comply with its charge. According to Section 1 of the ordinance, the purpose of the Historic Preservation board and its work "is to recognize, protect and promote the retention and use of historic sites and districts in the town, and to promote educational opportunities and awareness of the unique heritage of Pagosa Springs." Committee members were assisted by Town Planner Chris Bentley.

The new ordinance adopts criteria and procedures for the designation of historic landmarks and historic districts, and criteria and procedures for the review and approval of the proposed alteration, construction, removal or demolition of designated historic properties.

In order to have a single property qualify as a historic landmark, that property must be at least 50 years old, and be determined to have historic significance in accord with a set of criteria listed in the ordinance.

Historic districts, with contributing elements at least 50 years old, are "geographically definable areas possessing a concentration, linkage or continuity of buildings, structures and/or objects united by past events, plan or physical development. District boundaries are "defined by visual changes, historical documentation of different associations or patterns of development, or evidence of changes in site type or site density as established through testing or survey."

Applications to have a property or district receive historic designation will be reviewed by the town planning staff within 30 days of submittal. An application will then be forwarded to the Historical Preservation Board which will review it at a regularly scheduled monthly meeting or a special meeting called following staff review. The meeting will take the form of a public hearing.

After review by the board, whether approved or disapproved, an application will be sent to the town trustees for consideration. The trustees can, if they desire, create a historic landmark or district by ordinance.

Once properties are designated as historic, there are limitations put on owners concerning what can and can't be done to the property.

Criteria for allowable alteration, construction or removal of landmarks are part of the ordinance and a Certificate of Alteration must be obtained prior to any changes being made to a building or site.

Should unlawful alteration, demolition, movement or removal of a landmark occur, there is a review procedure established in the ordinance and changes in historic designation can occur if recommended by the trustees.

Designation of historic landmarks can be amended to add features or property to the site.

A determination of historic significance can be revoked upon petition to the Historic Preservation Board.

According to Bentley, a primary benefit of the new Historical Preservation ordinance is a link established between the local board and the Colorado State Historical Fund. That fund was established in 1990 in a Constitutional amendment and 28 percent of revenues generated by gambling establishments in Central City, Black Hawk and Cripple Creek are put in the fund.

Of the money in the fund, 80 percent is directed to statewide grants. Some those funds are then made available to projects listed on local landmark lists, administered by local governments.

Since 1993, 1700 grants have been awarded in Colorado, totaling $74 million.

"We now have an owner-initiated process for designating historic properties and districts," said Bentley. "Owners can get application forms in the planning office at Town Hall. Once people know program this is available, they'll be able to work with us. There is the chance state funds might be available for work on historic properties and there are state and federal tax credits available for work on designated properties. Members of the Historical Preservation Board intend to make detailed information available to the public in the near future."

 

'Good' financial picture for PLPOA

By Richard Walter

As of June 30, Pagosa Lakes Property Owners Association had total assets of more than $3.36 million, liabilities of $30,979 and a settlement fund balance of $782,487.

Those were the primary figures Director David Bohl had for members Saturday as he delivered the annual treasurer's report.

The lone sour spot in the economic situation for the association, he said, is that expenses for the first six months of the year in the reserve fund were under budgeted by more than $53,000.

Asked what the reserve fund is for, Bohl explained it is used for emergency maintenance and repair of facilities beyond routinely budgeted amounts.

Finance Advisory Committee Chairman Jim Corbay, in his following report, indicated one of the pressing needs is addition of funding for the reserve fund and said a committee has been named to determine how and how much.

Corbay also asked for a motion to authorize carrying over any end of year balance in the operating budget for 2000 to the year 2001 budget to offset possible increases in 2001 assessments. Otherwise, he told the association, "the federal government will consider the excess taxable income and we'll have to pay taxes on it."

"We can't tell if there will be a surplus," he said, "but we should allow for it." His requested motion was made, seconded and passed unanimously.

Doug Secrist, reporting as chairman of the Lakes, Fisheries and Parks Committee, outlined developments in the past year and prospects and plans for the future, using a slide presentation to enhance his comments.

He noted that partnerships with other public entities, cash expenditures, in-kind services and grant monies are helping the association create an enviable system. He also said the Village Drive-Park Avenue Trail is projected for completion in the next year's operations and will link up with the recently dedicated Pagosa Boulevard Trail.

Gene Cortright, as chairman of the Public Safety Committee, outlined the steps that were taken during the past year to phase out PSO operations to meet state mandates and the ensuing contract with Archuleta County and its sheriff's office which has since been terminated.

Bill Ralston, reporting for the Standing Road Committee, outlined how the $6.5 million road settlement funds were used. "First priority," he said, "was eliminating the 'paper' roads existing on association maps. If a person bought a property on which to build a home, he had every right to expect a road to that property. But in many cases they existed only on paper."

Second on the priority list were the major roads in the 17 subdivisions affected by the settlement. "We are now 99 percent finished with the project," he said, but added, "We have no funds left to complete the three remaining priority streets - Cord Avenue, Martinez Place and Alpha Drive.

"We are short about $200,000 to complete roads in the Trails and Highlands," he said. In the interim, by apportioning the remaining funds on a per property basis, "we can provide about $18.50 per lineal foot of road cost to individual property owners who wish to improve their roadways." He said current costs are running $25 to $35 per lineal foot depending on the type of construction desired.

Before the committee can plan for future street construction and maintenance, he said, "We need to know from the county what they will do and what we need to do.

"We can't even make cost estimates and begin to budget without knowing what roads we will have to deal with, what they need, and what we have to have to do the work."

Dahrl Henley, reporting for the Rules Committee, said the biggest ongoing committee project has been developing a revised Association Personnel Manual. "We thought we had it pretty well in hand," she said, "when we learned there were questions by legal counsel which had not been considered." The committee is now implementing those suggestions.

Finally, Bill Nobles, reporting for the Recreation Amenities Committee, said population growth constantly stresses the recreation center which has become a "busy hub of the recreational environment."

He said 675 annual center memberships were sold this year along with 3,450 weekly time share permits.

He pointed out the PLPOA board has recognized a need for expansion and the expansion fund now has a balance of about $192,000. The introduction this year of 12, 20 and 32-day visit punch passes has helped ease the load, he said, but expansion is a necessity.

"We hope to launch that program within two to three years," he said.

And, while the agenda had specifically allotted time for a presentation by homeowner David Sikes for discussion of maintenance of green belt areas by adjacent owners, Sikes was not present when called.

 

Getting started was a monumental task

By Richard Walter

Merely adopting the proposed agenda proved the first monumental task for members of the Pagosa Lakes Property Owners Association Saturday as they conducted their annual meeting.

With 123 voting members present, as determined by Fred Ebeling, association secretary, the mandatory 100 for quorum level was on hand.

Ebeling told the crowd the number present would mandate 63 votes for a simple majority on any issue and 82 if a two-thirds vote were necessary on any given motion.

First on the agenda, after final call for ballots, an invocation, recitation of the Pledge of Allegiance, introduction of the parliamentarian, and introduction of board candidates, was acting President Richard Manley's call for consideration of the agenda as approved by the board of directors.

And then the issues began.

Dallas Johnson, from the audience, questioned the planned 15-minute limit on all public comment, saying that was insufficient time for the many members who appeared to be prepared to speak.

"Property owners," he said, "should be free to express themselves on any association issue and limiting total public comment to a 15-minute time restraint sells them short."

When Mojie Adler moved from the audience to move the public comment section up the agenda ladder to become the second element after approval of the agenda, she got a second from Earl Beasley.

Before a vote could be called, a motion from the floor sought to amend wording of Adler's motion so that, if approved, it would allow members of the association to make motions from the floor. After a voice vote indicated no clear majority, a "division of the house" count was ordered with predetermined proctors using mechanical counters to record the votes.

The motion to amend passed on a 54-50 count.

But still the original motion was opposed. Former director Judy Esterly said the association discovered last year that moving items forward on the agenda was unwise. "Often," she said, "the questions voters have will be answered by committee reports. It seems unwise to ask the questions until after those reports."

Glen Cortright noting five reports were on the schedule, each with a five minute time limit, said "You're talking about 25 minutes or less, total."

An unidentified member of the audience said, "Of all the meetings, all year, this is the only time we have the opportunity to speak and make decisions which affect our own individual properties. I don't think there should be a time limit on public participation."

Once again, on voice vote there was no clear majority after the call. In division of house voting, the motion to move the public comment section up the agenda carried 58-52. But the time constraint dilemma remained.

Joe Donovan of Ranch Community said the concept of being able to make motions is part of American tradition. "I don't think it is reasonable to put time limits on the only section of the meeting where the people can speak. Don't limit the ability of members to participate in the business of this association."

Saying, "I've waited all year for this meeting," Johnson added, "let's let the people have their say."

Dennis Ford finally got the ball rolling and drew applause when he urged, "Let's get started and quit badgering each other."

Again, voice vote on removing the time constraint was inconclusive and a call made for division of house ballot. The motion carried 57-44. (See separate story for coverage of public comment section).

And finally, after 58 minutes, on a motion by Thomas Cruse, the agenda as amended was adopted by unanimous voice vote and the real meeting could begin.

 

Cruse, Bohl lead vote for directors

By Richard Walter

An appointed incumbent and a newcomer who advised association members in advance that his job requires him to be out of the area regularly were elected Saturday to full terms on the Pagosa Lakes Property Owners Association board of directors.

Winners from among four candidates for the board were appointed incumbent David Bohl who, on learning of his victory, immediately resigned his appointive position; and Thomas A. Cruse, a consultant to the Air Force, NASA and several aerospace companies.

Cruse led all vote getters with 896 and Bohl was second with 797. Running behind them were Gerald G. "Jerry" Smith with 634 and Mary E. Fletcher with 598.

At the same time, voters rejected - 1,289 to 274 - a proposed bylaw amendment which would have mandated maintenance of an Office of Public Safety "with appropriate staffing to perform crime prevention, emergency fire, safety and health duties, surveillance of residences and businesses, animal control, and when and if authorized under provisions of state law, perform law enforcement duties."

Voters decisively approved - 1,459 to 78 - an amendment which specifies the board shall appoint a "Member in Good Standing to serve out a term vacated, provided that term would have expired at the next annual meeting; calls for a special election to be held with the regularly scheduled election of directors to fill the term if it would not have expired at the next annual meeting"; and sets other rights for the person appointed.

That noted, with the election complete, one vacancy remains on the board and it is to be filled by appointment, probably at the regular monthly meeting Aug. l0.

 

Church renovation reveals top adobe technique

By John M. Motter

Renovation of the Saint Francis of Assisi Church located near U.S. 151 a few miles northeast of Arboles is well underway. Financial assistance for the work is coming from many sources.

The old building is a sterling example of adobe building techniques used by early Pagosa Country settlers. It also served as a focal point where early settlers gathered to share joys and sorrows common to their frontier existence. As such, it exemplifies rural frontier life during the latter years of the Hispano-Indian Frontier and the early years of the Anglo invasion.

Having served the needs of Catholics in the area for more than 80 years, the church is constructed of adobe bricks made on the spot. When a layer of stucco was recently removed from one wall revealing the adobe bricks, they were found to be in perfect conditions.

Adding to the outstanding character of the old building are the stained glass windows encased with handcrafted frames.

One source of funding has been the sale of a Navajo pictorial rug donated by a Santa Fe citizen interested in helping with the renovation. The rug features a central Yei-bi-chai figure enclosed by triangles and with heads at the top and bottom accentuated by feathers. The rug was auctioned by Christie's East of New York May 17.

The original church was erected on land obtained from Joseph Watts. Watts deeded two acres for the church and two acres for a nearby school building.

About 1910, families living in the area built the first church. That edifice burned Oct. 15, 1915 and was rebuilt in 1917. Three commissioners were appointed by the church to oversee the rebuilding.

Those commissioners were Teofilo Martinez, Rubio Gallegos, and Lino Garcia. Vicente Sanchez made the adobe bricks. Descendants of Martinez and Gallegos still live in the immediate vicinity. Several other people were hired to help with the work. The three commissioners bought needed materials and paid for the work.

During the early days, the church served as a school and community meeting place. The annual Feast of Saint Francis has been held there each October for many years.

Father Bernard, a Theotine priest, hired Abe Abeyta to rebuild the walls in 1950 using a church grant to fund the work. Money ran out after one wall was rebuilt. During 1993, the roof was replaced and the inside walls replastered.

Maintenance of the building is overseen by John and Florian Gallegos, who live nearby. Their passion is to see the building restored and preserved as a symbol of the proud past enjoyed by the community. Additional money and donated labor is needed to complete the project. Donations may be made at Citizens Bank in Pagosa Springs to the Saint Francis of Assisi Fund or by calling Florian Gallegos listed in the Ignacio telephone directory, or Manuel Trujillo in Pagosa Springs.

Funds for restoring the hand-crafted, stained-glass windows are being provided by the Pagosa Springs Knights of Columbus. The restoration work is being done by Magic By Design, a local firm.

Advice on how to retain historic features while restoring the building is being supplied by Cornerstone Community Partnership of Santa Fe.

The annual Feast of Saint Francis of Assisi will be celebrated Oct. 1 with a ceremony at the church followed by food at the Gallegos house. Services are conducted at the church on the first Sunday of each month by Father John Bowe of Pagosa Springs.

Frances is the name often given to the community where the church is located. A country school located nearby burned a few years ago. The school was known as the Stollsteimer School.

 

County gets 30-acre tract

By John M. Motter

Archuleta County gained title to approximately 30 acres of land this week.

The property is located in Cloman Industrial Park and has been the subject of negotiations with the Bureau of Land Management for several years.

At the regular meeting of county commissioners Tuesday, Kent Hoffman, associate field manager for the BLM and stationed in Durango, gave the county title to the property. The deed contains a reverter clause specifying that the county must use the property for public purposes, or title will revert to the BLM.

Among the conditions the county met during the successful negotiations was preparation of a sketch plan for the property's use. The sketch plan alludes to park facilities, picnic areas, ball fields, hiking and biking trails, and other recreational activities.

"Basically, we'll retain title as long as we use it for public purposes," said Dennis Hunt, the county manager. "That doesn't mean we can't revise the sketch plan."

A five-acre portion of the 30 acres is separated from the remaining property by Cloman Boulevard. The county contemplates using the five acres as a satellite location for county government functions. Consequently, because of the intended use, the county paid $50 for the five acres.

Development of the property awaits budget cycles, grant formulations, and other steps, Hunt said.

When negotiations for the property began several years ago, 40 acres were involved. During recent years, the Pagosa Springs Humane Society expressed interest in obtaining 10 of the 40 acres. Consequently, the Humane Society and BLM continue to negotiate the proposed acquisition. Because the Humane Society is not a governmental entity, they are required to purchase the 10 acres they are seeking.

 

Weather could be 'normal' by Sunday

By John M. Motter

Pagosa Country weather could return to normal by Sunday, according to Brian Avery, a National Weather Service forecaster from Grand Junction.

Normal for this time of year means monsoon rains, according to Avery. In Pagosa Country, monsoon does not carry the same meaning it does in India, where the term connotes deluges of rainfall. In Pagosa Country monsoon season normally lasts from mid-July through August as evidenced by almost daily afternoon thundershowers.

Fed by moisture acquired from both the Pacific and the Gulf of Mexico, the monsoon rains are normally of short duration, but occur daily. August is normally the wettest month in Pagosa Country, according to records maintained by the state climatologist.

"A high pressure ridge has been resting over our area for several weeks, blocking the moisture which normally flows from Mexico into the Four Corners area," Avery said. "Consequently, New Mexico has been receiving monsoon rains, but they haven't reached Colorado. That condition will continue into Sunday. Until then we'll have partly cloudy conditions with scattered showers late each afternoon. Temperatures will range from the high 80s to the low 90s during the day and drop to the low 50s at night."

By Sunday, conditions could start changing, according to Avery. The high pressure ridge is expected to drift to the east allowing normal, monsoon conditions to return to southwest Colorado. Temperatures will drop and precipitation totals will increase.

Last week, 0.24 inches of precipitation were recorded at the official National Weather Service station at Stevens Field. Measurable rain fell July 26, July 29, and July 30. The hottest temperature recorded was 86 degrees on July 27 and 29. The average high temperature was 84 degrees. The lowest temperature recorded was 44 degrees measured July 29 and Aug. 1. The average low temperature was 47 degrees.

 

Letters

Community meets challenge

Dear David,

It appears that the Piano Creek developers used my and others' names in their ad thanking us for our "support" for their project. I previously neither supported nor opposed the project, figuring they can do whatever they want with their private property. Actually enclosing multi-millionaires in a private preserve and keeping them away from the rest of us has its appeal - sort of like the San Diego Wild Animal Park. However, since they've chosen to misappropriate our private property - our names and reputations - in a commercial attempt to exaggerate their local support, I've changed my mind. I propose we form an organization of their "supporters." I would suggest we initially commit ourselves to some basic principles - free and unfettered use of natural resources by all members of the public, rejection of artificial barriers which would exclude anyone based upon economic class, race or ethnicity, and support of diversity. Perhaps we might all meet at the project we "support" for a big picnic - I hear the fishing is good out there. I'm sure they wouldn't refuse their "supporters" the right to use the property. We might even discuss the location of low- and moderate-income housing.

Seriously, Piano Creek, if you want to thank me for something - write or call - don't presume that I want my name in your ads.

Jim Denvir

 

Postponing forum

Dear David,

Early Monday morning of this week, I received a phone call from a candidate for county commissioner inquiring into the identity and motivations of those who were planning an election eve forum at the Pagosa Lakes clubhouse. The caller also wondered whether a number of candidates would bother to attend because of concern that it was a "put up job" to embarrass some of them.

Here is the gist of my response: Although the idea for the forum was mine, it was quickly embraced by many Pagosa Lakes residents as well as voters residing elsewhere in the county. The motivation as indicated on the flyer being distributed, was: "If you were not able to attend the League of Women Voters' Forum, or if your questions were not addressed due to time constraints, don't miss this opportunity to hear where the candidates stand (on the issues)." Among questions not asked at the League forum, but of major concern to county residents, are the future of road maintenance and law enforcement.

Unfortunately, Pagosa's active rumor mill swung into high gear and fingers were pointed at individuals who were not even involved in planning the forum, alleging ulterior motives. If asking candidates for their views on legitimate questions is considered somehow underhanded, I plead guilty. In any case, those of us who believe the forum was a good idea will not provide grist for the rumor mill. Instead, we are postponing the forum until the 2002 election.

It should be clearly understood that our differences with the incumbents are issue-related, and not based on personality or character. All of the candidates are to be commended for placing their reputations on the line in this campaign, and for that my hat is off to each of them.

Gene Cortright

Incident appalling

Dear Editor,

This (dog into hot spring ) incident was incomprehensible and appalling. When will we see a follow up article that this man (Shay McCurdy) was tried for impossible cruelty to an animal and given a significant jail term?

Jerry Edwards

Dallas Texas

Results posted

Dear Editor,

Election results will be posted on the below link as soon as possible after the election.

http://www.archuletacounty.org/election_result.htm also reachable from the www.archuletacounty.org website, click on Clerk & Recorder, look for the link.

Keep in mind, that all sites at the County Website are under construction and worked on when I have the time.

MSgt. Tim Evans

ACSO

Gone to the dogs

Dear Editor,

A response to the July 27 letter by Glen Goss. Most of us living in the immediate vicinity of Wolfwood, being longtime homeowners here, were not aware that you had left the Fairfield area and appointed yourself our spokesman.

We've asked around and no one has heard of you. Your non-factual and slanderous remarks reveal much about you! Are you one of those volunteers with a non-working muffler on their vehicle? I choose to reveal other information about my neighborhood situation.

The Watsons not only chose Pagosa to establish their nationwide rescue efforts, more specifically, they chose my residential neighborhood. The Lunas communicated with the majority of the homeowners surrounding the shelter and received overwhelming support. I haven't had a complete night's sleep in at least three years. I'm asking the other "close" neighbors to write and let the public know how their daily lives and property values are affected by the Watson's nationwide rescue effort.

The combined barking and howling of at least 40 animals is equal to a loud siren. The number of animals and pens has doubled since last year, with plans for expansion, they want to save all of them! They say it's none of my business. The stench is increasing as the ground becomes saturated with urine and feces. A little rain brings the odor in the ground to life, then washes it into my yard through the natural drainage of our hillside. With expansion, the noise and smell will only get worse. Magpies and crows inhabit the pens, then my yard. For three years now the landscape has been dotted with blue tarps, the collection of junk increases, no indication of a septic system, and an open ditch with gas and electric lines exposed. Where are the inspectors?

Prior to getting the current shelter license, the Watsons were breeding hybrids and claimed to have a kennel license, but didn't. They had at least 20 animals at that time. They started rescuing/collecting both dogs and hybrids at least two years before having a shelter license.

It's unfortunate when people, no matter how righteous their quest may seem, trample over others in order to achieve their purpose. The outworking shows a lack of respect for others, a lack of empathy for the suffering they cause others, a show of contempt, malice, and a callous disregard for their victims.

I have been stripped of all peace of mind, the right to the quiet enjoyment of my own property, and my property values and hard work have gone to the "dogs."

What is "creative financing?" Is it similar to the creative advertising I would need if my property were on the market?

EXAMPLE: Experience the natural beauty of Pagosa Springs! PRIME PROPERTY, joins Refuge, abundant wildlife, sounds of nature abound, pollution and harassment included, PREMIUM PRICE, must not be dependant on sleep!

Carolyn Fitzhugh

Stopped barking?

Dear Editor,

I hope the person who killed my granddaughter's dog had a great day. Let me tell you if you think you stopped the barking you are wrong. That dog had a song you could not forget and when it was for naught she was stopped. I hope you feel good now and I hope you live with the barking of dogs in your ear forever.

Thomas Fletcher

Waiting to happen

Dear David,

The recent incident at the hot spring was one just waiting to happen especially since the fencing and warning signs about the Spring have been removed. Are there any plans to restore the pathway, fencing and signage that describe the history of the Spring? The situation now is such that no one can even find the Spring, tucked back behind the motel.

There is a good possibility that the Hot Spring may be removed from the Colorado State Historical Register since the motel has been built too close to the Spring.

Let us hope that the person responsible for the Spring and the safety of those who wish to see our Hot Spring will restore the site to the original viewing area so all can safely see the natural wonder that gave our town its name.

Yours truly,

Lolita S. Manring

Editor's Note: As pictured in last week's edition of The SUN, the Spring owners have put security tape and No Trespassing signs around the hot spring. A new pathway was in place at the time of the incident as was a sign detailing history of the spring. There was no warning about temperature of the water.

Re-think, re-plan

Dear Editor,

My concerns over the future Wolf Creek Village bring one big question: Where will the water come from for such a large development?

As reported in The Pagosa Springs SUN on 7-27-00 there is a proposed population of 5,000. Thank you Archuleta County planners for your questions to Mineral County.

Reference waste water: 378,270 gallons per day (at build out). I question where that will be discharged. And if transportation is to be by limos or vans, why 4,276 parking spaces?

Lets all re-think, re-plan or plan a sensible village at Wolf Creek, or ask ourselves, does Wolf Creek need such? Wouldn't pristine beauty be better for all of us and Mother Nature, as it is NOW?

Thank you,

Pam Morrow

Ties from the past

Dear Editor,

I'm a new subscriber from California. I sure enjoyed John Motter's article dated Thursday, March 23, 2000. This was on "Pagosa Junction Loses Noted Landmark."

You see, I have ties in the past with both "Gato" and Pagosa Springs.

Mr. and Mrs. James Martinez, who raised my mother, went through school in Pagosa Springs. I have always referred to the Martinez's as my grandpa and grandma.

Many years past, Grandpa Jim was the sheriff of Archuleta County. Later he owned a bar in Pagosa Springs. The big flood, I don't remember the year (October 1911), completely wiped them out. They lost their home and all their belongings.

In later years, Jim worked as a guard at Buena Vista Reformatory. Then as a deputy marshal, deputy sheriff, and finally became the sheriff of Archuleta County.

And later, prior to his retirement, he worked for the Gomez family in the store that was moved to Pagosa Springs as a museum.

My younger brother, Isidore Vigil, went through school at Pagosa High. He had quite a reputation as an amateur pugilist there. Maybe some of the old timers there would remember him.

I know the Gomez family very well, and love them all. After I got out of the service in 1945, Felix (Gomez) and I went on quite a binge. All the way from Gato to El Frances. Felix Jr. and I became close friends, he being a youngster. He had me tell him stories of my war years. I was gunner-radio operator on B-26s and B-24s.

He told me: "Someday I'm going into the Air Force and come back and buzz this place, (Gato). He kept his word. He went into the Air Force Academy and got his flying wings. I later heard that he did come back and buzz Gato. Years later, the poor guy was due to retire from the Air Force. He was sent as a military attache to South America where he was killed. They said it was an accident. Personally, I believe he was a victim of terrorism.

As a young boy, I lived in and out of both Gato and Pagosa Springs. I loved that part of the country, and how I ended up in this rat race in California, I'll never know.

Well, that's my story. I am including a negative I came across of the railroad bridge in Gato (Pagosa Junction), and the Gomez store.

I have a few keepsakes from that area, maybe some day I will make a trip out there and donate them to the museum.

Ronald F. Vigil

San Lorenzo, Calif.

In defense

Dear Editor,

I am writing in WolfWood's defense.

We are a 501C(3) state-licensed facility that is inspected regularly. We comply with all regulations. We network with other licensed shelters on a regular basis. We work with various community groups. The following is a partial list of professional organizations we deal with, most of whom have sent representatives out to inspect our shelter: Humane Society of La Plata County, Humane Society of Pagosa Springs, Humane Society for Pets Sake (Cortez), City of Farmington Animal Shelter, Arnie's Orphans (Durango), Southern Ute Animal Control, Best Friends Sanctuary (Utah), Wyoming Division of Wildlife, Navajo State Park, Coastal Animal Services, Pagosa Springs High School, Pagosa Springs Middle School, School Within a School and Wild Haven.

We have received animals from court-ruled animal cruelty cases. We have rescued animals locally and from eight different states. We are considered competent and come highly recommended by all of the above organizations.

As to the "obnoxious fumes." The pens are cleaned daily, all feces are put in tied plastic bags and disposed of in commercial dumpsters,lids closed. The dumpsters are emptied weekly.

We have lived here since spring 1996. We purposely moved to an un-

 

Obituaries

Neva Jo Smith

Friends and family were saddened to learn that Neva Jo Smith died peacefully at her home in Pagosa Springs on Wednesday, July 26, 2000.

Neva was born in Antlers, Okla. in 1940 to Harold Nathaniel Harris and Lorene Ann Wilkins-Harris. In 1958 she moved to Pagosa Springs to make her home and on Dec. 2, 1959, she married Milo M. Smith. To this marriage were born three children, Anna Brewer, Nathan Smith and Shannon Smith.

Neva was an all-star basketball player before moving here, and was the Red Ryder Roundup Queen in 1958. She worked as a teachers' aide with special needs children, was a homemaker, made ceramics and worked as a meat cutter. She was an involved supporter of the 4-H program, youth soccer programs, Girl Scouts and local theater group, The Pretenders. She will be greatly missed by family and friends who said she was the best mother, best wife, best sister and the best friend you could ever have.

She was preceded in death by her parents. She is survived by her husband, Milo of Pagosa Springs; her daughter, Anna M. Brewer and fiance, Troy Cuckenburg, of Tolleson, Ariz.; her son, Nathan E. Smith of Mesa, Ariz; her daughter, Shannon J. Smith of Pagosa; her sister and brother-in-law, Malinda and Tommy Berkey of Moyers, Okla; her sisters-in-law, Helen S. Felt, Kathryn Marie Weikel, Ervene Morgan and Bernice Smith; and numerous nieces, nephews, grandnieces, grandnephews and more friends than could ever be counted.

Visitation was held at 10 a.m. Tuesday and services followed at Mountain Heights Baptist Church in Pagosa Springs with the Rev. Chris Walls officiating.

In lieu of flowers, the family suggests contributions to the American Heart Association.

 

People

Engagement

Mr. and Mrs. Bayard Forrest are pleased to announce the engagement of their daughter, Stephanie Rene, to Mr. Adam Conway, both of Pagosa Springs.

The wedding will take place August 19, 2000.

 

Riki Speer

A Pagosa Springs student was among more than 1,300 who graduated May 13 from Friends University in ceremonies at Kansas Coliseum in Wichita.

Riki Speer received her Bachelor of Science degree in biology.

Jacob Hymes

Jacob (Jake) Hymes, class of 1995, graduated in May from the Business School of the University of Colorado at Boulder with a Bachelor of Science in Business Administration with an emphasis on Finance and a minor in Economic. Jake graduated with distinction with a grade point average of 3.89 and has been hired at Tucker Anthony as an Investment Banking Analyst in their Denver office. He has been working there for just over a month and is enjoying what he does. He is living in downtown Denver and can be reached at jacob_hymes @hotmail.com.

Jim Sutton

Former Pagosa Springs banker Jim Sutton received the Western Heritage Service Award last night from Durango Pro Rodeo.

Sutton, who served at Citizens Bank in Pagosa from 1970 to 1991, lives in the Allison area where his parents settled in 1934.

He rode horseback to and from Allison School and then graduated from Ignacio High School before serving in the U.S. Navy. He returned to the area in 1956 to run the family dairy farm and married Margaret Tate of Bayfield.

Sutton continued farming while working at Citizens Bank and has served the farm community in various ways for several decades. He is currently secretary of the Pine River Canal Co.

Sutton was cited for his contribution to the Western heritage and healthy rural community of neighboring LaPlata County.

 

Sports Page

Soccer camp opens Monday

By Karl Isberg

Top-flight soccer instructors are coming to Pagosa Springs Aug. 7-11 courtesy of the Pagosa Sting soccer club, to conduct the Major League Soccer Camp at Golden Peaks Stadium.

According to Pagosa Sting coach Lindsey Kurt-Mason (also the Pagosa Pirate boys and girls varsity soccer coach) at least four MLS athletes, all from Great Britain, will act as instructors during the sessions. Kurt-Mason said the instructors are graduates of the Manchester United training camp. Manchester United is one of England's top-ranked Premiere League teams.

Local players ages 5 and 6 will attend camp 9 to 10:30 a.m. each morning, at a cost of $70.

Sessions for players 7 to 11 years of age are 9 a.m. to noon each day, with the fee set at $110.

Older players, 12 to 18 years, meet 5 to 8 p.m. each day for $110 or can opt for the extended camp package with activities from 1 to 4 p.m. and from 5 to 8 p.m. The cost of the extended package is $150.

Each camper receives a soccer ball for use during training sessions, as well as a shirt, tickets to a Colorado Rapids game, other gifts and a written evaluation.

Camp registration forms are available at Town Hall and in the foyer of the Sisson Library.

Kurt-Mason urges any local athlete interested in attending the MLS camp to call him at 731-2458 as soon as possible so that a soccer ball and other gift items can be ordered and received prior to Aug. 7.

 

Golf season opens

The 2000 Pagosa Springs High School golf season will officially begin with the first meeting of the high school team at 4:30 p.m. Monday. This meeting will be at the lunchroom of the golf course maintenance facility. All prospective golfers are asked to bring a signed physical form from their physician to this meeting.

A strong field of returning golfers is expected with a challenge being sent by the underclassmen to the returning veterans.

The Pirates have a full 11-tournament schedule set, with the home tournament being held at 9 a.m. Aug. 28. Local support is always appreciated.

Questions can be directed to Kathy Carter, 731-5736.

Fall sports practice schedules released

Fall sports practice schedules for Pagosa Springs High School athletes were announced this week.

Golf coach Kathy Carter will open practice at 4:30 p.m. Monday at Pagosa Springs Golf Club.

Track practice will open at 6 p.m. Aug. 14 at the high school track under new head coach Scott Anderson.

Mable Barber's cheerleading squad will open practice Aug. 15 (she still has openings on the team) from 7 to 9 a.m. and 6 to 8 p.m.

Football practice for Coach Myron Stretton's gridders will begin Aug. 14 with sessions from 8 to 10 a.m. and 4 to 6:30 p.m. There will also be a football camp Tuesday through Friday of next week.

The boys soccer team, under coach Lindsey Kurt-Mason, will open practice Aug. 14 with sessions from 7:30 to 9:30 a.m. and 6 to 8 p.m.

And, Volleyball Coach Penne Hamilton will put her charges into action Aug. 14 with sessions from 9 to 11 a.m. and 4 to 6 p.m.

All students intending to participate in high school athletics must have a completed physical examination and parent permit for athletic participation form before they will be allowed to practice.

The forms are available at local doctors' offices. Each student is responsible for making their own appointment.

 

Jr. High football

All students interested in playing junior high football must report to the junior high school gym on Monday, August 14. Practice starts at 4 and will go until 6.

Please come to practice with the physical and parent permission form completed. This form can be obtained through your local physician, and it must be given to a coach before a student can practice. Students should come to practice in shorts and tee shirts and with enthusiasm to play football.

If there are any questions regarding practice, please call coach Chris Hinger at 264-5802 or coach Jason Plantiko at 731-9592.

 

Community News

Chamber News

By Sally Hameister

Taste the real Pagosa as County Fair opens

Today marks the opening of the 2000 County Fair with a popular favorite - the Taste of Pagosa.

This event has a special place in my heart (and stomach) because I served on the organizing committee for several years before turning it over to fresh talent. It's a terrific social occasion as well as an outrageously tasty one, with something for absolutely everyone in the way of food. This year you will have, I believe, 16 food booths from which to choose - enough to put the average individual into a coma. I'll be selling tickets tonight, so I look forward to seeing you there. The Taste of Pagosa will begins at 3 p.m. and continues to 9 p.m.

It goes without saying that you need to attend the County Fair on the days subsequent to Taste: Friday, Saturday and Sunday. There is something magical about a fair that takes me back to my childhood days in Indiana when my dad would take us to the Indiana State Fair. I was always fascinated with the sights and sounds and, of course, food never tasted quite as good as it did during the fair. There are so many things to see and do throughout this three-day event that you could go every day and not complete the list. Hope to see you at one of the county's most exciting events - the annual Archuleta County Fair.

Volunteers

It's not too late to volunteer your services for this year's County Fair, and you can do so by calling Marti Gallo at 759-8124. Volunteers of all ages are needed in virtually every area, so please fill out a volunteer registration form and contact Marti. You will find the forms at the Chamber of Commerce, County Extension Center Office, Sisson Library, the Plaid Pony, Radio Shack, Ponderosa Do It Best, Paint Connection, Pagosa Kid, The Emporium, Pack 'n Mail, Silver Mine and Chromo Mercantile. Volunteers under 18 years of age will need parental consent, and an adult must accompany kids 10 to 13.

Pagosa Players

Among the many new and different offerings at this year's County Fair is an Aug. 5 performance presented by the Pagosa Players and King's Men. "Asleep on the Wind," a poignant one-act comedy, will be presented at 7 p.m. and again at 8 p.m. in the Pavilion Tent.

The play is set in 1972 Louisiana and explores the tender relationship between an older brother ready to out into the world and his much younger sister who is being left behind. Jason Earley and Allie Bailey are the young stars in this production.

Tickets are $3 for adults and $2 for children and seniors and are available at Wolftracks Bookstore and Coffee Shop, The Plaid Pony, Chamber of Commerce and at the door the evening of the performance.

Harmonious ladies

Kudos and congratulations to the exquisitely talented ladies of the Mountain Harmony Ladies Chorus after last Saturday night's performance at the Methodist Church.

Director Pam Spitler (filling in while Connie Glover takes a well-deserved respite from that position) and show chairman LaDonna Radney are to be commended for a truly engaging performance that kept the members of the audience laughing, crying, snapping and humming for the duration. I am always astonished at the immense talent displayed by this group and ever so grateful that each one is so generous and willing to share those talents. I don't think I've ever missed a performance, and I've loved every one of them. Thank you, ladies, for all the work that went into such a delightful performance, and thanks to Kate Terry for a delicious little cameo appearance.

Membership

We have two new members to welcome this week and three renewals. I will mention briefly that Morna will mail the September renewals in the near future, and it did take her some time to put that little project together. Each year we need new membership forms, new letters, new reminder forms, new decals and new benefit forms before we can attempt the mailing. Since the official membership year begins Sept. 1 here at the Chamber, there are more reminders than any other month.

You will notice we have increased the membership dues this year for the first time in three years. We like to think that our dues structure is as reasonable as they come and have been told by those who have belonged to other chambers in other areas that we are indeed most reasonable. We raise the dues only when we absolutely are forced to do so by other rising costs, and I honestly can't think of an area in which costs haven't risen dramatically in the past three years. For instance, in the area of postage, not only have rates increased, but we are mailing to more than twice the number of members that we were three or four years ago. Thanks to increased marketing efforts, we receive at least two to three times the number of calls we did in the past - and send far more vacation and relocation packets as a result. In 1992, the Visitor Center hosted 34,000 visitors, and this year we expect over 44,000 folks. Well, I'm sure you get the idea and hopefully understand that we do not, as some chambers do, raise dues every year as a matter of course. Obviously, if you have any questions or concerns, we will be more than happy to spend time with you to iron out any problems.

New member number one this week is our old friend, Harold Kornhaber, Master Painter, located right here in Pagosa. I first met Harold when he played the jolly old elf at Christmas in Pagosa for a few years before he retired from that position. He decided recently to do the right thing and join the Chamber, and we are delighted that he did so. He did, however, have a little trouble with the twenty-five word description required on the membership form, and began with "Once upon a time..." We didn't push the issue and are happy to report that Harold does everything in the painter craft. To learn more, please give him a call at 264-2789.

We welcome new Associate Members Jim and Jean Carson who, I'm sure, won't mind if I tell a little story on them. Poor Jim called me last Wednesday to learn the whereabouts of our SunDowner that night, and I promptly said that he would find that information on his invitation. When he hesitated, I said, "Jim, you ARE an Associate Member, aren't you?" When he answered in the negative, I did my Chamber Director song and dance, and he acquiesced in short order. To make a long story even longer, he arrived at the SunDowner with a check in hand - whatta guy! Thanks, Jim and Jean, for your membership - we do appreciate it.

Our renewals this week include Bill Goddard and Connie Bunte with The Choke Cherry Tree located at 1501W. U.S. 160 on Put Hill; Dick Bailey with Durango Coca-Cola locate at 75 Girard and Associate Member, His Royal Heinie, Lee Sterling. How nice that he is out and about looking like a million bucks these days. We love it, and him too.

Mesa Verde

We had a call this morning from the folks at Mesa Verde letting us know that the park will be open for business 6 a.m. Aug. 4. That area, as most of you know, has recently suffered a devastating fire, so it is particularly gratifying to learn that they will be open soon. Before you head that way, you may want to call the Cortez Visitor Center for any updated information at 800-253-1616.

"Forever Plaid"

This latest Music Boosters' production will be here before you know it, so pick up your tickets as soon as possible. I have been hearing the most fabulous things about the superbly talented cast and, of course, the music is all of my vintage when there seemed to be four members of every group - The Four Freshmen, The Four Aces, etc. More about this later, but for the time being pick up your tickets at the Chamber, Moonlight Books, the Wild Hare or the Sisson Library. Adult tickets are $12, students are $8, and 5 and under are $5. Performances will be at 7:30 p.m. at the Pagosa Springs High School Auditorium Aug. 17, 18, 19, 24, 25, and 26.

 

 

Pagosa Lakes

By Ming Steen

Rotary club seeks exchange study applicants

Today marks the opening of the 2000 County Fair with a popular favorite - the Taste of Pagosa.

This event has a special place in my heart (and stomach) because I served on the organizing committee for several years before turning it over to fresh talent. It's a terrific social occasion as well as an outrageously tasty one, with something for absolutely everyone in the way of food. This year you will have, I believe, 16 food booths from which to choose - enough to put the average individual into a coma. I'll be selling tickets tonight, so I look forward to seeing you there. The Taste of Pagosa will begins at 3 p.m. and continues to 9 p.m.

It goes without saying that you need to attend the County Fair on the days subsequent to Taste: Friday, Saturday and Sunday. There is something magical about a fair that takes me back to my childhood days in Indiana when my dad would take us to the Indiana State Fair. I was always fascinated with the sights and sounds and, of course, food never tasted quite as good as it did during the fair. There are so many things to see and do throughout this three-day event that you could go every day and not complete the list. Hope to see you at one of the county's most exciting events - the annual Archuleta County Fair.

Volunteers

It's not too late to volunteer your services for this year's County Fair, and you can do so by calling Marti Gallo at 759-8124. Volunteers of all ages are needed in virtually every area, so please fill out a volunteer registration form and contact Marti. You will find the forms at the Chamber of Commerce, County Extension Center Office, Sisson Library, the Plaid Pony, Radio Shack, Ponderosa Do It Best, Paint Connection, Pagosa Kid, The Emporium, Pack 'n Mail, Silver Mine and Chromo Mercantile. Volunteers under 18 years of age will need parental consent, and an adult must accompany kids 10 to 13.

Pagosa Players

Among the many new and different offerings at this year's County Fair is an Aug. 5 performance presented by the Pagosa Players and King's Men. "Asleep on the Wind," a poignant one-act comedy, will be presented at 7 p.m. and again at 8 p.m. in the Pavilion Tent.

The play is set in 1972 Louisiana and explores the tender relationship between an older brother ready to out into the world and his much younger sister who is being left behind. Jason Earley and Allie Bailey are the young stars in this production.

Tickets are $3 for adults and $2 for children and seniors and are available at Wolftracks Bookstore and Coffee Shop, The Plaid Pony, Chamber of Commerce and at the door the evening of the performance.

Harmonious ladies

Kudos and congratulations to the exquisitely talented ladies of the Mountain Harmony Ladies Chorus after last Saturday night's performance at the Methodist Church.

Director Pam Spitler (filling in while Connie Glover takes a well-deserved respite from that position) and show chairman LaDonna Radney are to be commended for a truly engaging performance that kept the members of the audience laughing, crying, snapping and humming for the duration. I am always astonished at the immense talent displayed by this group and ever so grateful that each one is so generous and willing to share those talents. I don't think I've ever missed a performance, and I've loved every one of them. Thank you, ladies, for all the work that went into such a delightful performance, and thanks to Kate Terry for a delicious little cameo appearance.

Membership

We have two new members to welcome this week and three renewals. I will mention briefly that Morna will mail the September renewals in the near future, and it did take her some time to put that little project together. Each year we need new membership forms, new letters, new reminder forms, new decals and new benefit forms before we can attempt the mailing. Since the official membership year begins Sept. 1 here at the Chamber, there are more reminders than any other month.

You will notice we have increased the membership dues this year for the first time in three years. We like to think that our dues structure is as reasonable as they come and have been told by those who have belonged to other chambers in other areas that we are indeed most reasonable. We raise the dues only when we absolutely are forced to do so by other rising costs, and I honestly can't think of an area in which costs haven't risen dramatically in the past three years. For instance, in the area of postage, not only have rates increased, but we are mailing to more than twice the number of members that we were three or four years ago. Thanks to increased marketing efforts, we receive at least two to three times the number of calls we did in the past - and send far more vacation and relocation packets as a result. In 1992, the Visitor Center hosted 34,000 visitors, and this year we expect over 44,000 folks. Well, I'm sure you get the idea and hopefully understand that we do not, as some chambers do, raise dues every year as a matter of course. Obviously, if you have any questions or concerns, we will be more than happy to spend time with you to iron out any problems.

New member number one this week is our old friend, Harold Kornhaber, Master Painter, located right here in Pagosa. I first met Harold when he played the jolly old elf at Christmas in Pagosa for a few years before he retired from that position. He decided recently to do the right thing and join the Chamber, and we are delighted that he did so. He did, however, have a little trouble with the twenty-five word description required on the membership form, and began with "Once upon a time..." We didn't push the issue and are happy to report that Harold does everything in the painter craft. To learn more, please give him a call at 264-2789.

We welcome new Associate Members Jim and Jean Carson who, I'm sure, won't mind if I tell a little story on them. Poor Jim called me last Wednesday to learn the whereabouts of our SunDowner that night, and I promptly said that he would find that information on his invitation. When he hesitated, I said, "Jim, you ARE an Associate Member, aren't you?" When he answered in the negative, I did my Chamber Director song and dance, and he acquiesced in short order. To make a long story even longer, he arrived at the SunDowner with a check in hand - whatta guy! Thanks, Jim and Jean, for your membership - we do appreciate it.

Our renewals this week include Bill Goddard and Connie Bunte with The Choke Cherry Tree located at 1501W. U.S. 160 on Put Hill; Dick Bailey with Durango Coca-Cola locate at 75 Girard and Associate Member, His Royal Heinie, Lee Sterling. How nice that he is out and about looking like a million bucks these days. We love it, and him too.

Mesa Verde

We had a call this morning from the folks at Mesa Verde letting us know that the park will be open for business 6 a.m. Aug. 4. That area, as most of you know, has recently suffered a devastating fire, so it is particularly gratifying to learn that they will be open soon. Before you head that way, you may want to call the Cortez Visitor Center for any updated information at 800-253-1616.

"Forever Plaid"

This latest Music Boosters' production will be here before you know it, so pick up your tickets as soon as possible. I have been hearing the most fabulous things about the superbly talented cast and, of course, the music is all of my vintage when there seemed to be four members of every group - The Four Freshmen, The Four Aces, etc. More about this later, but for the time being pick up your tickets at the Chamber, Moonlight Books, the Wild Hare or the Sisson Library. Adult tickets are $12, students are $8, and 5 and under are $5. Performances will be at 7:30 p.m. at the Pagosa Springs High School Auditorium Aug. 17, 18, 19, 24, 25, and 26.

 

Senior News

By Janet Copeland

Senior travel fees going up to $10 per trip

We were happy to honor our July birthday folks on Friday. Those present included Lena Bowden, Bob Cooper, Pat Foster and R.L. (Hoppy) Hopson. We also send out birthday wishes to Virginia Chavez, Lou Ann Waddell, Abel Martinez and Mae Boughan, who were not present for the party. Hoppy entertained us with several songs, including leading the crowd in singing Happy Birthday, and he also was the lucky winner of the drawing for the birthday gift.

We always appreciate Hoppy's talent and the wonderful old-time songs he brings to us. Also, we thank LaDonna Radney for the pretty table decoration for the birthday table.

Our guests on Friday included Andrea Allen (daughter of Evelyn and Hoppy Hopson), Bobby Bliss and Bob Cooper. Kathy Wendt, Bill Downey and Ken Fox also joined us for dinner and stayed for the Senior Board Meeting, which we appreciate. We hope all you folks will visit us again soon.

Monday we welcomed Frank K. Goodman (our new driver), Susi Cochran, Lucille and Art Lemmon, Pastor Hal Hintzman, Cheryl and Rebekah.

Sometimes financial restraints cause us to change things, which is the case regarding the weekly bus trips to Durango for seniors to go shopping. The $6 fees have not begun to cover expenses of these trips so the fee will go up to $10 and the trips will only be every two weeks (provided at least 10 people sign up to go). The cost of the trip is approximately $131.25 for an 8-hour trip, which includes driver and bus expenses (to include increased fuel costs), so even if 10 people go, the County will have to subsidize part of the costs. We are sad to have to make these changes but do it because of necessity. Medical shuttles will run separately on Tuesdays and Thursdays, price to be announced later.

Helen Girardin is our Senior of the Week this week. Congratulations, Helen. Helen has been a wonderful supporter of our program and we appreciate her.

The Colorado Senior Lobby annual meeting and western slope legislative assembly will be held in Grand Junction, Colorado on August 9 and 10. The Area Agency on Aging (AAA) will fund the registration and hotel fees for seniors desiring to attend, with attendees paying for transportation and some meals. Several of our folks plan to attend in order to talk with our state senators/representatives about Colorado increasing its 5 percent matching funds for senior programs (to federal funds) to a larger percentage. We appreciate their increase for this year but need to have this funded in the budget so we can plan for the future.

Mike Delsaso and Thurston Bybee of Bankers Life and Casualty Company gave a very informative presentation regarding Medicare, Medicaid, long-term insurance, nursing home coverage, etc. on Wednesday. These gentlemen also left some videos with us to further inform those who are interested. Thank you both.

Payge has several interesting activities planned for August, to include a stage coach ride to Mancos today, the Chama train ride on August 17, dining and a wagon ride at Astraddle-a-Saddle on August 24, and a pot-luck dinner/dance on August 31. Also the third senior picnic will be on August 18 in the park. I hope everyone will sign up for the things they are interested in so she will know what arrangements to make.

 

Cruising with Cruse

By Katherine Cruse

Hotshot lives up to firefighter nickname

A lot of people have asked me how my husband Hotshot got his nickname. To tell the truth, I have no idea. I came to me in a fit of writing. Out of the blue, really.

This summer, as I read about the fires, great and small, I've begun to wonder if maybe I should have picked a different name. Forest and park managers and local fire-fighting districts call for reinforcements, and one or two or ten Hot Shot teams respond.

It's hard to imagine what motivates these guys and gals to leave home and go live in tents somewhere, stand in line for showers and food and anything else, just so they can go out and do a horribly dirty and hot and exhausting job. A job that can turn dangerous at any moment with a shift in the wind.

It must give them an adrenalin high.

My Hotshot can build a mean campfire. He used to carry his own flint and tinder, just like those old mountain men. He can start a new fire in the morning with the banked ashes from the night before. (That really impressed the teenagers, when we were Scout advisors. "Oh, Mr. Cruse, can you show me how to do that?") But as far as I know, he's never fought any fires. Or at least, not until last week.

Remember that big storm a couple of Sundays ago? Well, maybe you don't. Never mind. It was while the Bircher fire was still growing, over at Mesa Verde. We were home. Hotshot was cutting the grass. I was doing something important, like playing games on the computer.

The clouds began to gather, dark and threatening. A few lightning bolts and thunder. Then a very close one. Flash and Wha-am! Light and sound came almost simultaneously.

I started the process of shutting down the computer. I know it's akin to closing the barn door after the horse has run away. But the adage, equally old, that lightning never strikes twice in the same place has been proven to be wrong.

Hotshot put away the yard stuff as the first raindrops began to pelt down. Then we sat down on the front porch and prepared to "admire the storm." Roiling black and gray clouds, more lightning bolts, and the rumble of thunder. Stupendous. We've cringed through many of these storms in the high country, cowering in a tent or hunkered down in a clump of mountain willow. It's really great to watch them from the safety of a sturdy structure.

Almost immediately we saw a little column of smoke, just a plume, on the ridge behind a neighbor's house. Our first thought was, why are those folks burning tree cuttings now? Are they crazy? Don't they know there's a fire ban on? Almost immediately came the second, more rational thought, that's not their fire. I ran to the phone. Hotshot grabbed the car keys.

We live out in the Meadows, where lots are big and houses are far apart. It's probably a couple of tenths of a mile from our house to the neighbors. The hillside behind their house is covered with scrub oak, the stuff that we've read makes really good fuel for wildfires.

Our neighbor had seen the smoke before we did. In fact, she had seen the actual lightning strike. She had already called the fire department. About 10 minutes before. She told them, "I can see flames! I can see flames!"

Hotshot, already on his way up the neighbor's drive, screeched to a halt, grabbed a shovel from her garage and raced up the hillside. He and a deputy sheriff on patrol, who had seen the strike, were the first two folks on the scene. Hotshot dug and whacked. The two of them shifted burning pieces of wood. The deputy sprayed them with his carry pack.

The wind came up, and it began to rain sideways. I wasn't going out there. I trained the binoculars on the hillside, looking for the action from the safety of my home. I could see yellow shirts and hard hats, so I knew the volunteer firefighters were on the scene.

But not all of them. From another window I watched a volunteer's pickup, and then a fire truck, and then a fire captain's car miss the turn off Meadows Road. It took them a little while to get turned around and headed back to the right road. I felt so helpless, watching and not being able to communicate, "Over here! This way!"

Hotshot came back home, wet and dirty and exhilarated. "They've got it under control," he reported. He gave me the blow-by-blow description. He was pretty pumped.

The experience left me with a couple of thoughts. First, even though it was raining at the time, the rain had little effect. The wood and the ground are incredibly dry. An hour after this downpour, you would hardly have known there'd been a storm. If people hadn't put the fire out, the rain alone might not have done the trick. The fire could have traveled along roots or even just dead branches lying on the ground and grown into a major threat.

Second, the quicker someone starts fighting a fire, the smaller and easier it is to deal with. I know, that's really a no-brainer. But hey, if you see a strike near your place, or smoke, don't lollygag. Pick up the phone.

Our volunteer fire fighters drop what they're doing when those beepers go off. They leave the dinner table, the golf course, their jobs, to put out the blaze and incidentally protect our property.

Sometimes, if you get there first, your actions can make a difference. A friend of mine cooled down a small grass fire, one that had maybe started from a motorist's cigarette, with a jug of water. So now I keep a gallon in my car, just in case. But I hope I don't have to use it.

Thanks, volunteer firefighters. You're the real Hotshots.

 

Library News

By Lenore Bright

Political postings must have identification

Historically the library, as a public information resource center, has allowed candidates and issue committees to place pro and con handouts in our "political area." During the next few months, we will continue this practice. All information must have the name of the person and/or organization responsible for the handout. Any material without this identification will not be allowed.

Floods and droughts

Colorado had four major droughts in the last century: 1930-42, 1949-57, 1958-70, and 1976-82. It appears we are in another one.

According to the National Water Summary, Colorado's mountainous terrain produces a complex climate. Precipitation ranges from about 7 inches to 60 inches per year in various parts of the state. Our area usually receives subtropical moisture from the Pacific. It generally begins in early July, and peaks near the beginning of August. Not so this year. Keep your eye on the Pacific cyclones that may also bring us moisture. These cyclones are often frequent enough to make October the wettest month in southwestern Colorado. You may have a copy of this interesting report. Ask at the desk.

Web sites

www.highcountrygardens.com provides a new catalog from the Santa Fe based greenhouse that has become nationally recognized for its plants that do well in the west. They also can be reached at 800-925-9387.

Another site will show pictures of the Mesa Verde fire. Park workers want to prepare visitors so they won't be shocked when they come to the park.The pictures should be up soon at www.nps.gov/meve/mvnp/pages/mvnp.htm.

Transportation meeting

Anyone interested in commenting on the statewide transportation plan should attend the 7 p.m. Aug. 7 open meeting at the county commissioners' meeting room in the courthouse. State highway planning extends to 2020. If you want to suggest stop lights, stop signs, ingress and egress on our local highways 160 & 84, this may be your last chance to do it.

Tickets on sale

Another reminder that our multi-talented Music Boosters will be bringing us a funny musical "Forever Plaid," on two weekends in August. The dates - Aug. 17,18,19,24,25 and 26. We have tickets on sale at the Library. Invite your house guests, and enjoy a special evening out.

Department of Labor

The federal government created a packet of information about the enforcement of laws involving mandatory labor standards. The education/outreach team will even conduct presentations regarding these laws to groups requesting such information. The packet may be checked out. It includes information about: Compliance with the family and medical leave act, guide to fair labor standards act, overtime compensation work hours, child labor laws, and the necessary records that must be kept by employees.

New books

"Citizen Coors," by Dan Baum, is the riveting saga of the Colorado dynasty. Baum, a former reporter for the Wall Street Journal, captures the genius, eccentricity, and the tragic weaknesses of the remarkable Coors Family.

"Butterfly gardening," by the Xerces Society and the Smithsonian covers a vast amount of information about insect lore. The Xerces Society is an international nonprofit group dedicated to the prevention of human-caused extinction of rare invertebrate populations and their habitats.

"Granny's Recipes, Remedies and Helpful Hints," by Jean Cross is full of tried and true tips and treats that have stood the test of time. Learn how to predict the weather, and preserve, pack, and pickle everything from peaches to pork!

Donations

Thanks to the following for materials: George Dudley, Peggy Shipman, Scotty Gibson, Carol Hakala, Joyce Webb, Paula Miser, Bev Worthman and Ann Van Fossen. Financial help came from The Pagosa Woman's Civic Club to augment the Friends Book Endowment. A special donation came from Richard and Martha Coons and her visiting family. The note said, " Thank you for a wonderful summer reading program. We have been most impressed with how well organized your summer reading program is. We are going to share your ideas with the Austin Public Library System." Congratulations to Mary and her committee who are to be commended for their good work.

 

Local Chatter

By Kate Terry

Catholic youth set for Rome pilgrimage

The Roman Catholic Church is celebrating its Jubilee Year - a Christian event celebrated every 25 years. One million people will make a pilgrimage to Rome and St. Peter's Basilica this holy year. This includes the 194 people from Diocese Pueblo - with 13 adults and 17 youth from Immaculate Heart of Mary Church in Pagosa Springs.

The departure date is Aug. 10 and the return date is Aug. 21. Each day while there, the group will visit a different basilica.

The members of Immaculate have worked hard for three and a half years to raise the necessary monies for this pilgrimage. For the youth, the pilgrimage celebrates World Youth Day. Truly, they had a mission.

Those going with Father John Bowe as their leader are: Ed Berrich, Chris and Darlene Gallegos, Paul and Darlene Dean, Mark Garcia, Gene and Debbie Tautges, Sara Sutton, Rose Noriega, Richard and Susan Hampton, Jeremy Gallegos, Andrea Dean, Amanda Noriega, Joe Maimer, Chris Tautges, Thomas Hampton, Isaiah Lucero (Boggie), Jessica Espinosa, Henry Espinosa, David Martinez, Kathy Martinez, Marisol Villalobos, Timothy Quintana, Chris Read, Resa Mercado, Armando and Melanie Espinosa.

Around town

It was a dream come true for Lyn and Jack DeLange. For four years they had planned a trip to New York City to celebrate July 4, 2000. Seven of their friends, including Cody Wilson who used to live in Pagosa Springs, flew in to help them celebrate. Their sail boat was anchored in the Liberty State Park Marina, a better place to watch the activity than if they had been in the city. They saw the tall ships - approximately 110 - and saw the fireworks illuminate the sky from upper Manhattan to the Statue of Liberty. And they watched a stealth bomber fly across; this is what the men enjoyed most. Will Spears at KWUF had made a tape of marching tunes for them and this they played while watching the fireworks. To be sure that New York knew they were there, they flew a banner that read "Greetings from Colorado and New Mexico."

Judy Wood wants to thank all the people who donated food for the Friends of the Library annual Meeting. Blanket thanks are extended because of the possibility of forgetting someone; but someone who takes the time to make 200 meatballs for the buffet deserves recognition. Thank you Barbara and Cecil Tacket.

Pat Riggenbach, a long time volunteer at the Pack Rat and Sisson Library, who now lives in Surprise, Arizona, is recovering from back surgery.

Many locals do not realize that the Fun Shore Classes at Fairfield Activity Center are open to area residents and their visitors as well as Fairfield's guests. There are classes for all ages and interests. A weekly schedule is available in the Fairfield Activity Center (The former My Favorite Things Post Options).

Long time resident Beth Moore had a stroke. She is at her daughter Sarah Seidel's house. The address is Rabbit Creek Ranch, 3101 Arrowhead Road, La Porte, Colorado 80535-9374.

Betty Feazel celebrated her 84th birthday last week (July 25). Her son Turner and his family who live in Newburgh, Indiana, and her daughter Lucy and her family at Durango helped her celebrate.

The original Denny Rose watercolor that she donated as a fundraiser for Patty Aragon's cancer treatment is on display at Pagosa Office Supply except when the painting is removed for club and organizations who are participating in the raffle. The painting is available to any organization wanting to participate.

The team of 88 kids and adults who visited Pagosa Springs last week were from Columbus Baptist Church in Waco, Texas. Their help was amazing. This service is something they do every summer, going all over the country. They helped at the Methodist Thrift Shop, and did repairs and painting for elderly people in the community. These were just a few things they did. They stayed at Community Bible Church.

It would be nice if the local restaurants would give individual bills instead of all orders on one bill. Some do.

Remember, there is still a fire ban on.

Fun on the run

Mrs. Crumps was called to jury duty but asked to be excused because she didn't believe in capital punishment and didn't want her personal thoughts to prevent the trial from running its proper course.

But the public defender liked her thoughtfulness and quiet calm, and tried to convince her that she was appropriate to serve on the jury.

"Ma'am," he explained, "This is not a murder trail! It's a simple lawsuit. A wife is bringing this case against her husband because he gambled away the $12,000 he had promised to use to remodel the kitchen for her birthday."

"Well, okay," agreed Mrs. Crumps. "I'll serve. I guess I could be wrong about capital punishment after all."

 

Editorials

Making folks think

With Archuleta County voters going to the polls August 8 for an important primary election, an admission is in order. Two years ago I endorsed Linda Delyria's opponent in the Republican primary election. That election decided who would be an unopposed candidate for the county commissioner's seat for District 3 in the November 1998 election. Two years later, I admit I was wrong. I should have endorsed Delyria.

Based on my decision of two years ago, I thought I would be keep my opinions to myself this year. After all, making a public endorsement in a small locale such as Pagosa only tends to make some folks unhappy.

Instead, I concluded that next to trying to micro-manage all the various facets of county government, the worst thing a county commissioner or anyone else in a position of responsibility can do is to try to make everyone happy. (I regret that I did not realize two years ago that Delyria would not have entangled herself in either of these disruptive, self-serving actions.)

This realization helped remind me that an editor of a weekly newspaper should not concern himself with making everyone happy. He should be concerned with making folks think.

I plan to vote for Commissioner Ken Fox in the primary election because experience is a valuable asset in county government. Five years ago, the Republicans gave Fox such overwhelming support in their county caucuses and assemblies, that the incumbent Republican county commissioner whom Fox was challenging failed to get enough voted to have his name placed on the primary ballot. In the contested November 1996 general election, county voters voted Fox into office for his first term as a county commissioner.

Now, four years later, with the county's population experiencing significant growth and changes; based on his four years of experience as a commissioner, Fox bypassed the county assembly and instead circulated petitions to have his name placed on the Republican primary ballot. Required to have at least 52 signatures to qualify for the primary ballot, Fox's petitions contained the names of 230 registered Republicans when the documents were returned to the county clerk.

With four years of productive experience, Fox is the best qualified candidate in District 2 to continue to provide the county with reasonable leadership. He now has a greater understanding of the job demands - both at the county, regional and state level - that are imposed on a county commissioner. He has demonstrated that he has the ability to work effectively with the other elected county officials and that he respects the abilities and expertise of the county staff.

I plan to vote for Mike Branch in the District 1 race for the Republican nomination for county commissioner.

With no candidate seeking the Democrat nomination for county commissioner in the district, the winner of the Republican primary will be the next commissioner for District 1.

Though not experienced as a public official, as a CPA, Branch's experiences as a contracted auditor has enabled him to develop an understanding of the operation of the county offices and their elected officials, as well as with other taxing entities in the county and with their elected directors. These experiences have resulted in Branch openly acknowledging his opposition towards county commissioners misusing their authority to micro-manage the county.

Branch's business investments likewise have given him with personal exposure to the operations, regulations and procedures of the county planning department, road and bridge department, assessor's and treasurer's offices. Branch does not have the answers to all of the county's problem, but like Fox, he knows enough to seek the counsel of qualified individuals who are experienced and familiar with the workings of the Archuleta County Courthouse and of Town Hall.

I am confident that two years from now, I will not be compelled to admit it was a mistake to endorse Ken Fox and Mike Branch as county commissioners. I am confident the county will benefit from their diverse leadership. And that with Fox and Branch as county commissioners, Archuleta County will be on track to effectively handle the rapidly increasing and changing demands that faces it.

David C. Mitchell

 

Dear Folks

By David C. Mitchell

I'm looking ahead to being gone

Dear Folks,

A few years ago, I read that the winning entry in a contest for the most improbable introductory sentence for a novel said: "In the beginning was God, but wait . . . I'm getting ahead of myself."

That's my situation as I type this. I'm trying to get ahead of myself so I won't have to be here at this time next week to write Dear Folks. I need to finish this so I can start my vacation.

The crew at the SUN are urging me on because they can't wait to get rid of me for a week or so.

If everything goes right, and that's hoping for a lot when you are scheduled to "fly the flighty skies of United," I'll be vacationing with my younger sister in Canada on August 3.

I've mentally aligned her with the McReynolds side of the family.

The Mitchells were from Lamesa, Texas, in Dawson County. The McReynolds were from Canyon, Texas, in Randall County.

It's hard to believe they used to argue about which was more scenic . . . "Randall County or Dawson County?"

Anyone who has traveled U.S. 87 between Amarillo and Midland, Texas, knows it's much like arguing, "Which is wetter the Atlantic Ocean or the Pacific Ocean?"

Mom and Dad grew up in the days when Texans were from Texas . . . not Chicago, New York City, Philadelphia and other fountains of migration that produced the latter-day Texans who presently populate the state. So such arguments seemed to have some sort of relevance.

Mom and Dad had two sets of children. My older brother was born in 1931. I came along in 1934.

My younger brother was born in 1945, and maintaining the three-year pattern in age differences. My sister Katherine was born in 1948.

I'm glad the folks held out until they were blessed with a "female" they could name.

She exemplifies the McReynolds heritage of compassion, independence, tenacity, intellect, spontaneous humor and laughter.

In a sense she's the youngest of the McReynolds. My Uncle Joe, 91, is the oldest . . . thanks to the tenacity of Aunt Dorothy.

Uncle Joe suffered a stroke four years ago. After Uncle Joe was in a coma for a few days the doctors said it was time to remove the life support. But due to the McReynolds' influence that had rubbed off on her, Aunt Dorothy replied, "I've still got 30 more minutes on my parking meter. Give him 30 more minutes." No way was a McReynolds going to waste a quarter.

Thirty minutes later the doctors came out to report Uncle Joe was showing signs of improvement; but even if he survived, he "would probably be a vegetable."

Unfazed, Aunt Dorothy said, "That's okay. Maybe he will be an artichoke. I really love artichokes." Today they look back and laugh about their experience.

My sister's much the same way. To everyone else things might appear to be pitch dark. But to Kathy it's time to cheer up, because there isn't any glare to bother anyone.

So I'm looking forward to the next 10 days. Not because of where I will be, but because of who I will be with.

Know you are loved and please keep us in your prayers.

David

25 years ago

Road requirements discussed

Taken from SUN files

of August 7, 1975

The county commissioners Tuesday discussed roads in the Pagosa in Colorado development and the requirements that must be met before they could, or would, accept such roads into the county system. Commissioners also received from Willard March title to land involved in the airstrip extension. At the same time, they granted variances on adjoining property so March could sell smaller tracts than provided for under regulations.

The town board Monday night considered the new franchise application of Universal Telephone Co. The franchise is for 25 years and is along the same lines as previous franchises.

Representatives of the Veterans of Foreign Wars are in the community this weekend in the interest of establishing a local post of that organization. Any ex-serviceman interested in this effort should contact Bill Curvey at the Spring Inn or Ralph Yamaguchi.

The Loggers Tournament at Pagosa Lodge drew a large crowd of spectators and several participants Sunday. Bobby Lord, of Wolf Creek Industries, was awarded the champion logger trophy with Eugene Enriquez, of San Juan Lumber Co., named as runner-up.

 

Legacies

By Shari Pierce

The influenza epidemic of 1918

One other important event of 1918 that Mrs. Kachel touched on in her letter was the influenza epidemic. This affected not only our county, but the entire nation.

Mrs. Kachel's mother, Anna Ellsworth, listed names on her calendar of some of the local people who lost their lives during this year: "The Boone boy, Mr. Dyke, Mrs. Williamson, Tony Boyle, Mr. Nieder, Ralph Russell, Sam Sullenberger, John Dowell, A.B. Long, Helen Friend, Fred Rock, Fred Kuhn, Mrs. Fred Kuhn, A.A. Putnam." While not all of these folks died from the flu, it did take a heavy toll on Pagosa Springs.

A Dec. 28, 1918 entry on the calendar indicated the flu ban had been lifted - "there was a picture show that night."

On Friday, October 11 and the following week, a notice appeared on the front page of The Sun. The notice gave eight suggestions of ways to protect yourself from influenza. Accompanying the notice was another bit of information, "The disease is spread by the secretions of the mouth and nose, and these secretions are infectious for some time after they are expelled. No person or age is exempt, and the robust as well as the weak are affected."

The November 15 issue listed deaths of five people from the influenza. Next week, four more flu-related deaths were reported.

There was also a warning from Editor Bud Furrow encouraging people to "observe the few simple rules that appear necessary to keep it from spreading." This included the recommendation that people "keep at least three feet away from everyone, including your family."

Dec. 6 brought reports of another six flu-related deaths. Editor Furrow called for a "strict quarantine to be clamped on in Archuleta County against the flu, and kept on until every case of the deadly malady is stamped out."

A "Public Notice" was issued by Dr. Mary Winter Fisher and F.A. Byrne of the Board of Health in the Dec. 20 SUN. Because no new cases of the influenza had been reported since Nov. 11, except two traced to people who had come from Bayfield, it was decided it was safe to lift the quarantine. "All persons who are in anyway indisposed are requested to remain at home and be examined by a physician. Any guest indisposed in hotels, the proprietors are requested to report to health officers. All residences and hotel rooms where influenza exists will be placarded."

And so the worst of the epidemic was over.

 

Features

Pacing Pagosa

By Richard Walter

X'd hydrants inoperative, due for repair

A reader worried about inoperative fire hydrants in Pagosa Springs may have a legitimate concern, particularly with reference to one South Side neighborhood. But even there, officials say, safety is not being compromised and the repair program has begun.

Three hydrants in that area (between 5th and 6th streets and Zuni and Pierce Streets) are clearly marked with white Xs, a fire department signal to personnel responding to a call that the hydrant so marked should be ignored and hook-up achieved at another location.

Pagosa Fire Protection District representatives acknowledged the marking and said the department regularly conducts tests of hydrants to determine flow rate and whether the instrument is working properly.

In most cases, the hydrants are on lines operated by Pagosa Area Water and Sanitation District, and that organization is notified of every location indicated as unsatisfactory by fire department tests. It is PAWS responsibility to make repairs because it is the actual owner.

I examined the area and found X-marked hydrants at 5th and Zuni, 6th and Zuni and at 6th and Pierce (immediately behind the town's public works garages). I was told that two Lewis Street hydrants had been marked but walking the length of the street I found two that had either been replaced or repaired recently. A fourth marked hydrant is located in a parking lot at the far east end of the town.

There is an operating hydrant at 5th and Apache streets, the only one in the neighborhood. The next closest hydrants are atop the Apache Street hill at 7th Street and a block and a half north of Zuni on 6th Street.

Gene Tautges, assistant general manager for PAWS said the water facility and fire department work hand in hand to facilitate repairs and replacement.

"We have an intergovernmental agreement wherein we pay them (fire department) annually to test all of the fire hydrants and recommend places where repair and/or replacement are needed."

He said the hydrant at 5th and Zuni was repaired within the last two weeks but the fire department has not yet had a chance to test it for flow. "That's why the hydrant is still marked."

Tautges noted PAWS has purchased special repair equipment needed for some hydrants and has at least one employee expert in its operation.

An experienced firefighter himself, Tautges said the department has prepared for tanker shuttles anywhere in the district if necessary. "And the LDH (large diameter hose) the department purchased last year can become, in essence, a portable water main up to 1,400 feet long if one or more hydrants in an area are found inoperative.

Tautges estimated there may be as many as 15 hydrants in the district right now which are in need of some form of repair and that department personnel are taking that action as time allows.

I have been told there are at least two (possibly four) X-marked hydrants in the Pagosa Lakes area.

The inoperative hydrants do not necessarily peril firefighter efforts in the neighborhoods where they are located. The 5th and Zuni area, for instance, is adjacent to the San Juan River and water could be pumped from the river as well as from tankers sent to the scene and from the three nearest hydrants.

There is some concern, too, about hydrant access for the downtown business district. A key hydrant, at the San Juan-Pagosa Street corner, has been repeatedly hit by autos and is currently sealed off. This is a major repair project that could involved CDOT (it is on a state highway) and lane closure to enact repair.

"There is some reason to expect," Tautges said, "that relocation of that hydrant would be a more prudent solution."

There are hydrants at 4th and Pagosa Street, in the alley behind the Catholic church, on Lewis Street in front of the same church, at 4th and Lewis, and at the intersection of Lewis and 5th Street-Fourmile Road.

The hydrant on the southeast corner of that intersection was removed during the reconstruction this summer. The only other hydrant in the immediate downtown area is in Centennial Park behind the courthouse.

Litter abounds

Two areas make the list of worst-littered sites this week, and one of them is a repeat nominee.

For a while it was cleaned up, but the area of U.S. 84 extending southward from the county highway maintenance facility to the intersection with County Route 119 is again an apparent target for anything drivers wish not to have in their cars. Debris of all kinds lines both sides of the southern gateway into Pagosa Country.

With County Fair coming this weekend, the sight can only get worse for all our visitors.

The second nominee is the area at the Sports Complex adjacent to the high school where spectators park to watch games from their vehicles. Directly across from the Worthe Crouse Vocational Center is a sea of empty beer and soft drink cans and bottles.

This littering is all the more reprehensible because there is a trash receptacle just a few feet away in front of the vocational building.

 

Old Timer

By John Motter

Blanco oldtimers relive good old days

By John M. Motter

They carted picnic baskets full of homemade goodies to the old Dillinger cabin last Sunday, a reunion of folks laden with stories of yesteryear, folks with faraway looks in their eyes. A common denominator shared by all was former residence in the Basin and former attendance at the long-gone, country school.

The splendor of the Upper Blanco Basin, ringed by violent crags, its floor carpeted with gentle verdance, may be unmatched anywhere in the world. To the north, Squaretop's almost 12,000-foot noggin squints across a shoulder of Granite Mountain. A little to the east, Oil Mountain uncoils skyward almost 12,500 feet, and east of Oil Mountain a phalanx of peaks splitting the North American continent east from west approach, and even surpass, 13,000 feet. This southern branch of the San Juan Mountains was known to oldtimers as the Conejos Range, named after the many forks of the river with the same name snaking into the Range from the San Luis Valley side.

Place names around the head of the Basin, some of them shared with the Rito Blanco and Navajo Rivers, are as varied as the features they describe - Squaretop, the Needles, Gunsight Pass, Castle Creek, Elephant Head Rock, Snow Mountain, Glacier Lake.

It's only fitting that talk at the Sunday reunion should turn to the imposing mountains and outdoors which overshadowed life for the assembled oldtimers before cars and television and such became commonplace.

"You know, residents of the Basin always called that Oil Mountain because there are some oil seeps up there," said Ray Brown, who lived in the Basin as a youth during the early 1920s. "People from town call it something else."

On U.S. Forest Service maps, the same mountain is identified as Engineer Mountain. Some folks in town call it Blackhead.

All former Basin residents share the memory of listening to rocks rumble ominously down the slopes of Granite Mountain, sometimes during the day, sometimes during the night.

The oldest person present Sunday was Faye Brown, who admits to 42 years unless she's pressed, then owns up to 95 years and even admits being Ray's mother.

"I went to school here until I married," Faye said. "I married at age 17. The first year I went to school, we rode four kids on one horse.

"Junior Jones lived up the road. He let it be known that he was going to trap a big bear that had been visiting around the community. He told everyone to come running when they heard three shots so they could see the trapped bear. Well, I was on the horse and had just gone through a gate when I heard three shots.

"When I got there, the biggest bear I ever saw was in the trap. That bear looked kind of peaceful. Junior asked, 'Who wants to shoot the bear?'

"My brother Louie, who was 12 years old, volunteered and Junior handed him the gun. I couldn't stand to see the bear shot and I didn't want to hear it's squeals, so I ran away. They brought me back to watch."

According to others who were there, Faye had a horse named Roachy, a horse she had taught to do tricks such as guess a person's age. Roachy would continue to paw with one foot until the age of the person was reached.

"Roachy would count as long as I held a hand on her shoulder," Faye said. "When I removed my hand from her shoulder, she would stop pawing."

At times, Roachy stretched the limits of even Faye's love.

One particularly wet spring when abundant rain lubricated the local gumbo to a perfection of stickiness, Faye was forced to climb off of her mount in order to open a gate. In the process, the difficulty of extracting her feet from the mud allowed Roachy time to prance through the gate and down to the other end of the property.

Eventually, Faye worked her way out of the mud, scraped several pounds of the stuff from her feet, and crossed the ranch where she found Roachy languishing, as far removed as possible.

"As I approached, Roachy wanted to shake hands," Faye recalled. "I was so mad I refused and started to hit on him. I could have killed him. Then he knelt down, kind of bowed, and all of the mad left me. I couldn't hit him any more."

Everyone had a story. Emory Minium recalled two former Basin oldtimers, Ray Chambers and Bert Smith. Emory is a Basin oldtimer himself.

"Ray used to hitch up his team and head for town," Emory said. "When he'd pass Burt's place, he'd stop and Bert would climb into the wagon alongside him. They'd go on to town, just talking away and never paying any attention to the horses, who had been across the route so many times they didn't need any guidance.

"Eventually, Ray bought a car, but he wasn't about to change habits of long standing. On his way to town, he picked up Bert, just as he had always done. And, just as they'd always done, they were soon engrossed in a discussion of the finer points of county politics. A bit later, the car swerved into a ditch and refused to move.

" 'Danged newfangled contraptions,' Ray complained. 'Can't trust 'em no way. Take your eyes off of the road for 15 minutes; next thing you know, you're in the ditch.' "

Ray Brown told a story on Margaret Dillinger that reveals a great deal about the courage and fortitude required in the days before helicopters whisked folks to faraway hospitals in almost the twinkling of an eye.

At the time of the story, 1932, the Browns had moved across the mountain to the Left Hand Canyon, Sheeps Cabin Creek area. The Dillingers still lived at the upper end of the Upper Blanco Basin. The road to town from the Upper Blanco passed in front of the Brown residence.

Ray's knowledge of the story began when Margaret's mother rode a lathered horse up to the Brown house with 9-year-old Margaret riding behind. It seems Margaret had broken off a sewing machine needle, the sliver of steel stuck in a finger and possibly lodged in a bone. After several hours of horsebacking through an accumulation of unplowed winter snow, the mother-daughter pair reined up at the Brown place for a quick cup of coffee, then continued on their way.

A few hours later, they reached their destination, the doctor's office in Pagosa Springs. Removal of the needle was a simple task for the doctor. With the needle gone, mother and daughter resumed perches on the horse, pointed it's head to the southeast and home, and, with a tongue click and a poke from a booted heel, launched the return trip. After enjoying another cup of coffee with the Brown's, they reached the soothing warmth of home on the Upper Blanco No one knows for sure how long the trip took, but it must have required 17 or 18 hours, surely an arduous journey for a 9-year-old with a needle stuck in her throbbing finger.

Sunday's reunion was held on the Dillinger place. The original cabin was built by the current John Dillinger's father, also called John Dillinger. It is constructed of hand-hewn, squared logs with the traditional porch running the length of the front of the structure. The elder Dillinger came to Pagosa Country in the early 1900s and proved up on the Basin homestead in 1910, according to son John. The elder Dillinger was an engineer on the logging railroads at Dulce, El Vado, and Pagosa Junction. He left railroad employment in order to work the Basin homestead. He passed away in 1936.

Son John attended the Basin school through the fourth grade and again through the sixth and seventh grades. The rest of his school time was devoted to Pagosa Springs High School.

Present Sunday were John and Dolly Dillinger, Emory and Nell Minium, Faye Teeson Brown and son Ray, Lena Jack and family from Bend, Ore., George and Hattie Masco, Leona Adams Thayer, Nadine Ford Adams, and several others.

Most had attended school in the Upper Blanco, many of them taught by "Miss Ruby" also known as Ruby Sisson for whom the county library is named. Many were the tales told about "Miss Ruby." And reluctant were the folks who climbed slowly into cars, removing themselves from the beautiful Blanco Basin and memories of a now idyllic the past.

 

Drop quote:

"It's only fitting that talk at the Sunday reunion should turn to the imposing mountains and outdoors which overshadowed life for the assembled oldtimers before cars and television and such became commonplace."

 

Upper Blanco oldtimers talk about the good old days

 

Video Review

By Roy Starling

Summer's best not a blockbuster

I don't like to admit this, but next week the gaping jaws of public education open in Seminole County (just to the east of where I'm writing this) and I'm obliged to fall into them. Hey, a man's gotta make a living.

Therefore, this seems like a good time to review the big summer movies. Every summer, as you know, Hollywood (not a real person) puts its figurative finger on the metaphorical pulse of the average film-goer in an effort to determine what it would take to get the luckless clown to put down his remote and shell out six bucks for a movie. The result of this careful market analysis is always a spate of fresh, sophisticated, innovative, meticulously crafted films - films that stretch the limits of the art and probe the depths of the human soul, tirelessly searching for the lowest common denominator.

For the meager 35 cents you paid for this paper, I offer the following suggestions to help you select only the finest offerings as these movie masterpieces gradually move into Pagosa Springs.

"The Nutty Professor II: The Klumps"- I was unable to see this one due to the restrictions of three of Roy's Rules: (1) Stay away from remakes. (2) Stay away from sequels. (3) And never, never go see a sequel to a remake. Still, I have to admire the courage demonstrated by Eddie Murphy and company when they went out on a limb, hoping against hope that Americans would shell out six bucks to see a series of tasteless jokes about obesity and bathroom functions.

To make up for not seeing this cinematic landmark, I revisited the original "Nutty Professor," a clever retelling of the Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde story, written and directed by Jerry Lewis back in 1963. Nerdy chemistry Professor Kelp (Lewis) concocts a potion to add bulk and muscle to his tiny frame. The result transforms Kelp into a cruel but seductive lounge lizard/singer called Buddy Love. Singing at a shady student hangout, Buddy moves in for the kill, so to speak on Miss Purdy (Stella Stevens), one of Kelp's students.

If you've ever seen a Lewis film, you can guess what Kelp looked like: disheveled, pillow-headed hair with bangs down to his brows; thick, black-framed glasses riding low on his nose; a distinct overbite; high-water pants with white socks shining beneath the cuffs.

Buddy, on the other hand, shows up in a sky-blue suit with black trim, a pink shirt, a red tie and a white vest. His face is shining with oil, his hair with what can only be lacquer. In short, he looks just like the real Jerry Lewis, especially when he belts out a swivel-jawed rendition of "That Old Black Magic."

We would've never had Pee Wee Herman or Jim Carrey without Jerry Lewis, and for that reason alone I'm not a big fan of his. I have to admit, however, that this is a pretty good movie. As was the case for the original Dr. Jekyll, Kelp's "Hyde" gets out of control and starts showing up without being called, and, just as Buddy is crooning into the mike, Kelp's nasal twang breaks through.

"Mission Impossible II" - Well, dang it, there are those three restrictions again, and to them I'll add a fourth: "With the exception of 'Star Trek,' never see a movie based on a TV show."

"Chicken Run" - I forced myself to see this one as a favor to a friend. That friendship is now rather strained. The film inspired me to go out for chicken quesadillas afterwards. I've seen worse movies, but when it comes to chicken stories I prefer "The Nun's Priest's Tale."

"Gladiator" - Roy's Rule No. 5: "Never go see a movie in which a whole bunch of half-nekkid men try to kill each other with swords and spears." I wish they wouldn't run with those things!

"The Patriot" - Also known as "Braveheart Comes to America," . . . oh, who am I kidding?! I can't help you choose among these big-budget bloated wart hogs! I'll just tell you briefly about one of the best movies I've seen this summer:

"Jesus' Son" - Based on a short collection of stories by Denis Johnson, this film features a moronic but likable heroine addict (Billy Crudup) as its narrator and major character. Except for a colorful expletive, this pathetic guy doesn't even have a name and, just as you begin to think he doesn't deserve one, he shows his humanness, his soul.

What we see and hear in "Jesus' Son" comes to us from a disjointed, fragmented consciousness. The narrator interrupts himself, corrects himself and jumps back and forth in time, but he certainly tells some interesting tales. These yarns give voice to people we don't hear much from, people whose stories are usually condensed in obituaries at the end of their short lives. Some are drunks, some are drug addicts, some are both, some are street people, but almost all of them wear their brokenness on their sleeves. As the narrator says of a badly deformed man he meets at a "home," "No more pretending for him! He was completely and openly a mess. Meanwhile the rest of us go on trying to fool each other."

These are marginal, underground people, way out of step with society. They sort of make up their lives, hour by hour, as they go along. Unlike most of us, the "scripts" for their life stories don't include the support of a family, the comforts of home, the satisfaction of a vocation. They'll never know if these things would really make them happy.

Featuring brief but fine performances by Dennis Leary, Dennis Hopper and Holly Hunter, "Jesus' Son" is funny, jarring, touching, dark and very poetic. While there is plenty of drug use in the movie, there are no characters in it we'd want to grow up to be like. Consequently, if my offspring were still young and impressionable, I'd rather them see "Jesus' Son" than "Nutty Professor II," "Road Trip," "Scary Movie" or "Me, Myself and Irene."

The film was just recently released and could be showing up in Durango soon for a short run. Its title, incidentally, comes from a Lou Reed song.

 

Births

 

Chase Ryan Denison

Cindy Cunningham and Brad Denison would like to announce the birth of their son, Chase Ryan Denison, born on July 6, 2000 at 2:06 a.m. He weighed 7 lbs., 4 ounces and was 19 inches long.

 

Autumn Sage Thaxton

Heather and David Thaxton of Sparks, Nev., proudly announce the birth o f their daughter, Autumn Sage Thaxton on July 1 at Saint Mary's Regional Medical Center in Reno, Nev. The young lady weighed in at 7 lbs, 11 ounces. Her parents are former Pagosa Springs residents.

 

Business News

Land Sales

Seller: James E. and Patricia A. Gotcher

Buyer: Eaton Pagosa Properties Inc.

Property: Eaton Pagosa Estates Subdivision, Lot 21

Price: Not listed

 

Seller: Richard C. and Elizabeth A. Helm

Buyer: Maxence Ariza and Ellen D. Balter

Property: Pagosa Meadows Unit 2, Lot 57

Price: $23,900

 

Seller: Tom H. and Maudie I. McCord

Buyer: Brook L. Johnson

Property: Pagosa Vista, Lot 220

Price: $36,000

 

Seller: Nancy N. Bliss

Buyer: Bliss Family Childrens Trust

Property: Pagosa Vista, Lot 610

Price: Not listed

 

Seller: Centurytel of Colorado Inc.

Buyer: Patricia Hawkins

Property: North Village Lake, Lot 92X

Price: Not listed

 

Seller: Dora Jaramillo

Buyer: Archuleta County

Property: 13-32-1W

Price: Not listed

 

Seller: John O. Martinez

Buyer: Archuleta County

Property: 13-32-1W

Price: Not listed

 

Seller: Joe D. Martinez

Buyer: Archuleta County

Property: 13-32-1W

Price: Not listed

 

Seller: Matthew Martinez

Buyer: Archuleta County

Property: 13-32-1W

Price: Not listed

 

Seller: Sunrise Construction Inc.

Buyer: Robert A. Bagdon

Property: Chris Mountain Village Unit 2, Lots 254. 255 and 256

Price: Not listed

 

Seller: Sunrise Construction Inc.

Buyer: Jeremy Scott and Debra Douglas Caves

Property: Chris Mountain Village Unit 2, Lots 53 and 54

Price: Not listed

 

Seller: Barbara A. and Sean B. Copeland

Buyer: PNC Bank FSB

Property: Rio Blanco Cabin Sites Unit III, Lot 17, Block 3

Price: Not listed

 

Seller: Mangurian Partnership

Buyer: Maria and Wojciech Kuros

Property: Pagosa Village Service Commercial, Lot 31

Price: $190,000

 

Seller: Dorothy L. and Donald L. (dec), Wheeler

Buyer: Dawn L. Andrews

Property: Aspen Springs Subdivision 4, Lot 5, Block 8

Price: Not listed

 

Seller: Eugene Hanson Revocable Trust

Buyer: James K. Schugart and Gaela Morrison Shugart

Property: Rio Blanco Valley Subdivision Unit IV, Tract 26

Price: $11,700

 

Seller: Volkmar and Rita Walsch

Buyer: Paul Midgley and Pamela Novack

Property: Martinez Mountain Estates, Lot 53

Price: $55,000

 

Seller: Donald M. and Nancy Blaine

Buyer: John S. and Louise Gardner Alger

Property: San Juan River Resort Subdivision II, Lot 56X

Price: Not listed

 

Seller: John S. and Louise Gardner Alger

Buyer: Donald M. and Nancy Blaine

Property: San Juan River Resort Subdivision II, Lot 55

Price: Not listed

 

Seller: Fairfield Comm. Inc. (Ben owner)

Buyer: Charles F. and Linda L. Franke

Property: Lakeview Estates, Lot 92

Price: $8,000

 

Seller: William Archer and Frances Price Smith

Buyer: Smith family living trust

Property: Teyuakan, Lot 12

Price: Not listed

 

Seller: Trust of Rita R. Scott

Buyer: Andreas and Angela Bauer

Property: Whispering Wood Subdivision, Lot 15

Price: $25,000

 

Seller: W.T. Grant

Buyer: George Elliott

Property: Pagosa Lakes Ranch Custom Home, Lot 3

Price: Not listed

 

Seller: Wendy S. Gardner

Buyer: Richard R. III and Elizabeth M. Strohecker

Property: Lake Forest Estates, Lot 470

Price: $118,500

 

Seller: Colorado Housing Inc.

Buyer: Hope Dunbar

Property: Lake Pagosa Park, Lot 6, Block 8

Price: $9,500

 

Seller: Walter B. & A. Ovella Snyder, W&O Snyder Trust

Buyer: Matthew C. and Claudia L. Matzdorf

Property: Lakeview Estates, Lot 118

Price: Not listed

 

Seller: Colorado Housing Inc.

Buyer: Dearle A. Ricker

Property: Lakeview Estates, Lot 118

Price: $10,000

 

Seller: Loretta Sanchez

Buyer: Billy G. and Linda S. Burchfield

Property: Piedra Estates, Lot 80

Price: $49,900

 

Seller: Colorado Housing Inc.

Buyer: Natalie Koch

Property: Pagosa In The Pines Unit 2, Lot 326

Price: $9,500

 

Seller: Colorado Housing Inc.

Buyer: Patricia A. Vorhies

Property: Pagosa In The Pines Unit 2, Lot 330

Price: $10,000

 

Seller: Dennis Schwab

Buyer: Melvin P. Shoning Jr.

Property: Pagosa In The Pines Unit 2, Lot 268

Price: Not listed

 

Seller: William Edgar Jr. and Mary McCoy Deal

Buyer: David Troutman

Property: Pagosa In The Pines, Lot 22, Block 11

Price: $13,000

 

Seller: PSC Enterprises LLC

Buyer: Rick A. and Cindy W. Mueller

Property: Emarald Lake Ranch, Tract B

Price: $325,000

 

Seller: La Plata Electric Assn. Inc.

Buyer: Kerry and Dee Ann Hansen

Property: Lake Hatcher Park, Lots 216 and 217

Price: Not listed

 

Seller: Signataure K Homes Group LLC

Buyer: Philip K. York and Li-Chu Cherry

Property: Tract B

Price: $53,000

 

Seller: Gilbert R. Wofford

Buyer: James M. and Naomi J. Owens

Property: Aspen Springs Subdivision 6, Lot 71

Price: $9,000

 

Seller: Phil H. and Loretta L. Weldon Fam. Ts., Phil H. & Loretta L. Weldon Family Tst As

Buyer: PC San Marcial Real Estate LLC

Property: Piedra Park Subdivision Unit 1, Lot 21, Block 4

Price: $8,000

 

Seller: Navajo River Ranch LLC

Buyer: Garrett A. and Laura A. Levan

Property: Navajo River Ranch Unit 1, Tract 9

Price: Not listed

 

Seller: Garrett A. and Laura Levan

Buyer: David L. and Glenna N. Jackman

Property: Navajo River Ranch Unit 1, Tract 9

Price: $306,000

 

Seller: Sharon E. Colby

Buyer: Sharon E. Colby Living Trust

Property: Pagosa Meadows Unit 4, Lots 251 and 252

Price: Not listed

 

Seller: Sharon E. Colby

Buyer: Sharon E. Colby Living Trust

Property: Town of Pagosa Springs, Lot 11, Block 27

Price: Not listed

 

Seller: Harvey and Olga Chivilova Prins

Buyer: Debra A. Stowe

Property: Lakeview Estates, Lot 91

Price: $159,000

 

Seller: Guardian Abstract & Title Company Inc.

Buyer: Judith Ann McDonald

Property: Piedra Park Subdivision No. 2, Lot 6, Block 2

Price: Not listed

 

Seller: James A. and Lynn A. Bobik

Buyer: Ernest R and Virginia M. Carr

Property: Twincreek Village, Lot 780

Price: $14,500

 

Seller: Colorado Land Exchange Inc.

Buyer: Andrew G. Fenney

Property: Aspen Springs Subdivision 6, Lot 109

Price: Not listed

 

Seller: Andrew G. Fenney

Buyer: Carl and Kathleen Marie Pulciani

Property: Aspen Springs Subdivision 6, Lot 109

Price: $8,700

 

Seller: Norman Le and Sylvia A. Mabry

Buyer: Dawn Thompson and John Webster

Property: Pagosa In The Pines Unit 2, Lot 193

Price: $159,000

 

Seller: Allen G. Bitters

Buyer: Henry M. and Wilma J. Espoy

Property: Pagosa Meadows Unit 4, Lot 177

Price: $278,000

 

Seller: John S. and Jo Ann Costa

Buyer: Brian A. and Laura L. White

Property: Pagosa Meadows Unit 2, Lot 80

Price: $82,500

 

Seller: Paul A. and Barbara Wiget

Buyer: Frederick and Julia Brule

Property: Pagosa Highlands Estates, Lot 715

Price: $6,500

 

Seller: Ronald and Marian Hayenga, Hayenga family trust

Buyer: Richard A. Babillis

Property: High West Subdivision Unit 11, Lots 8 and 9, Block 1

Price: $180,000

 

Seller: Charlie Spicer

Buyer: Stephen E. and Kathleen L. Brown

Property: Aspen Springs Subdivision 3, Lot 5, Block 9

Price: $6,500

 

Seller: Charles D. and Jean L. Harvey

Buyer: Scott G. and Charlene P. White

Property: Lake Forest Estates, Lot 239

Price: $153,000

 

Seller: La Plata Electric Association Inc.

Buyer: R.M. Loran

Property: Lake Pagosa Park, Lot 18X, Block 11

Price: Not listed

 

Seller: Kenneth L. and Fulvia Lanier

Buyer: Lanier family trust

Property: A portion of the Crowley Tract within the Tierra Amarilla Land Grant

Price: Not listed

 

Seller: La Plata Electric Association Inc.

Buyer: Earl N. and Dena D. Eliason

Property: Pagosa Highlands Estates, Lots 52 and 53

Price: Not listed

 

Seller: Joe and Loni Silvia

Buyer: Ricky J. and Jill F. Armentor

Property: Pagosa Highlands Estates, Lot 289

Price: $6,500

 

Seller: Barry L. Harrell and Troy D. Felber

Buyer: Theodore A. Leighton

Property: San Juan River Resort Subdivison I, Lot 140

Price: $149,500

 

Seller: Richard E. and Deborah A. Butman

Buyer: Sean M. and Connie S. O'Donnell

Property: Pagosa Highlands Estates, Lot 489

Price: $11,700

 

Seller: Andrew Shelby and Betty Olivia Hobbs-Delaney

Buyer: Pagosa Mountain Properties LLC

Property: Ridgeview Subdivison, Parcel 3

Price: Not listed

 

Seller: Thelma S. Parker

Buyer: Jerry and Carolyn Evans

Property: Aspen Springs Subdivision 6, Lot 80

Price: $7,200

 

Seller: William B. and Judy A. Gibson

Buyer: Kenneth P. and Doris M. Lott

Property: Twincreek Village, Lot 974

Price: $15,000

 

Seller: Jesse and Mary Gonzales

Buyer: Michael Lee and Cheryl Ann Curtiss

Property: Aspen Springs Subdivision 2, Lot 16, Block 3

Price: $8,500

 

Seller: Curtis E. Borron

Buyer: Jerry E. Zimmerman

Property: Lake Pagosa Park, Lot 21, Block 8

Price: Not listed

 

Seller: Jerry E. Zimmerman

Buyer: David and Jennifer Vincent

Property: Lake Pagosa Park, Lot 21, Block 8

Price: Not listed

 

Seller: Lucille V. and LeRoy J. Durfee

Buyer: Seth A. and Linda Crain

Property: Pagosa In The Pines Unit 2, Lot 51

Price: Not listed

 

Seller: Jerry and Diana Wiggins

Buyer: Zenthoefer family partnership

Property: Lone Pine Condos, Unit 105

Price: $85,500

 

Seller: Danny R. and Christy McKeithen Gotchall

Buyer: Lyle A. Miller

Property: Aspen Springs Subdivision 3, Lot 28, Block 16

Price: $98,000

 

Seller: Douglas Steven and Deena Lynn Gardow

Buyer: James D. Winter family LP

Property: Pagosa Meadows Unit 4, Lot 163

Price: $82,500

 

Seller: Steve, Don & Beverly L. Simonson and Joy Madden

Buyer: Steve Simonson and Joy Madden

Property: Aspen Springs Subdivison 3, Lot 14, Block 5

Price: Not listed

 

Seller: Maria Rose Trujillo

Buyer: Becky P. Everage and Epifanio P. Trujillo

Property: Town of Pagosa Springs, Lot 18, Block 33

Price: Not listed

 

Seller: James C. and Abbe A. Stroud

Buyer: Warren L. Jr. and Janette L.J. Strickland

Property: 1-35-3W

Price: $815,000

 

Seller: James E. Godbold

Buyer: E. Jim Fritz

Property: Pagosa Vista, Lot 70

Price: $32,500

 

Seller: Archuleta County Treasurer, Byrl D. Whitcomb

Buyer: Pete Diepersloot

Property: Pagosa In The Pines Unit 2, Lot 254

Price: Not listed

 

Seller: Archuleta County Treasurer, Edwin C. & Juanita J. Likes

Buyer: Merilatt Corporation

Property: Pagosa Vista, Lot 358

Price: Not listed

 

Seller: Archuleta County Treasurer, Bryan J. and Ron R. Valverde

Buyer: James G. Bishop

Property: Pagosa in the Pines Unit 2, Lot 356

Price: Not listed

 

Seller: Great Divide Investments, Inc.

Buyer: Loumex Exports Inc.

Property: Aspen Springs Subdivision 6, Lot 356, Pagosa Trails, Lots 492, 493, 430, 431, 193, 194 and 195

Price: Not listed

 

Seller: Ross Granby

Buyer: Loumex Exports Inc.

Property: Lake Forest Estates, Lot 211

Price: Not listed

 

Seller: Kenneth D. Lorang

Buyer: Kevin E. Edwards

Property: Aspen Springs Subdivision 5, Lots 165 and 172

Price: $13,000

 

Seller: Thomas P. Collier

Buyer: Carol Collier Anderson, Steven R. Collier and Christine Collier Toro

Property: Chris Mountain Village Unit 2, Lots 228 and 229

Price: Not listed

 

Seller: Evva H. and Robert F. Brockschmidt

Buyer: Edward J. and Sharon D. Lincoln

Property: Pagosa In The Pines, Lot 8, Block 3

Price: $150,000

 

Seller: Carl Pitts

Buyer: Nancy and Steve Kitson

Property: Twincreek Village, Lot 437

Price: $18,000

 

Seller: Beverly and Sherry Lewis

Buyer: Lisa T. Moore

Property: Lake Pagosa Park, Lot 3, Block 11

Price: $64,900

 

Seller: Colorado Land & Exchange Inc.

Buyer: Jack Rich

Property: Aspen Springs Subdivision 2, Lot 26, Block 5; Subdivision 3, Lot 9, Block 8 & Lot 10, Block 8, Lot 25, Block 10, Lot 2, Block 9, Lot 3, Block 9, Lot 23, Block 9, Lot 24, Block 9; Subdivision 4, Lot 37, Block 8; Subdivision 6, Lots 46, 47, 49, 216, 532,

652, 711, 720, 771, 772, 824, 399 and 428

Price: Not listed

 

Seller: Colorado Land and Exchange Inc.

Buyer: Jack Rich

Property: Aspen Springs Subdivision 4, Lot 70, Block 294, Lot 28, Block 8, Lot 16, Block 12, Subdivision 5, Lots 16, 202, 327, 328, Subdivision 6, Lots 94, 109, 132, 213, 263, 294, 478, 579, 620, 625, 632, 664, 666, 756, 824 and 467

Price: Not listed

 

Seller: Donald C. and Barbara J. Zepp Family Trust

Buyer: Jack Rich

Property: Aspen Springs Subdivision 6, Lots 116, 475 and 647

Price: Not listed

 

Seller: Jack Rich

Buyer: Aspen Springs Associates

Property: Aspen Springs Subdivison 1, Lot 2 Block 2; Subdivision 4, Lot 16, Block 12; Subdivison 5, Lot 171; Subdivison 6, Lots 116, 191, 287, 343, 393, 558, 647, 680, 721, 765 and 441

Price: Not listed

 

Seller: Deer Valley Estates

Buyer: Jack Rick

Property: Aspen Springs Subdivison 2, Lot 6, Block 2; Lot 29, Block 15; Subdivison 4, Lot 40 and 41, Block 8 and Lot 129

Price: Not listed

 

Seller: Donald C. and Barbara J. Zepp Family Trust

Buyer: Jack L. Rich

Property: Aspen Springs Subdivision. Price: Not listed

 

Seller: Robert Wayne and Ella Marie Williams Veigel

Buyer: Terra Partners

Property: Lake Pagosa Park, Lot 33, Block 11

Price: $70,000

 

Seller: Jean M. and James H. Sitton

Buyer: Jean M. Sitton Trust, James H. Sitton Living Trust

Property: Piedra Park Subdivison Unit 6, Lots 4, 5 and 6, Block 4

Price: Not listed

 

Seller: Jean M. and James H. Sitton

Buyer: Jean M. Sitton Trust, James H. Sitton Living Trust

Property: Piedra Park Subdivision Unit 6, Lots 2 and 3, Block 4

Price: Not listed

 

Seller: Kimberly A. Colletto, Anthony T. and Kimberly A. Colletto RLT

Buyer: Anthony T. Colletto

Property: Not listed

Price: Not listed

 

Seller: Anthony T. Colletto, Anthony T. and Kimberly A. Colletto RLT

Buyer: Lotsland Investors Inc.

Property: Pagosa Highlands Estates, Lot 600

Price: $6,700

 

Seller: Archuleta County Public Trustee, Diana K. Nordin

Buyer: Mortgage Electronic Reg. Sys. Inc.

Property: Aspen Springs Subdivison 4, Lots 11, 12 and 13, Block 12

Price: Not listed

 

Seller: Archuleta County Public Trustee, Rachel J. Emmons

Buyer: Norwest Bank Minnesota NA (Trustee)

Property: Aspen Springs Subdivison 1, Lot 4, Block 11

Price: Not listed

 

Seller: Martha H. and Theodore H. Kittell

Buyer: Martha H., Theodore H. and Mary K. Kittell

Property: Town of Pagosa Springs, Lots 1, 2, 3, 6, 7 and 8, Block 16

Price: Not listed

 

Seller: Virginia Neal Schmidt

Buyer: Michael G. Mauldin

Property: Aspen Springs Subdivision 2, Lot 1, Block 16

Price: Not listed

 

Seller: Michael G. Mauldin

Buyer: Lynn M. and Heidi J. Moir

Property: Aspen Springs Subdivison 2, Lot 1, Block 16

Price: $15,000

 

Seller: Robert G. Splawn

Buyer: Amy D. Robidoux and Jeremiah Case

Property: Lake Forest Estates, Lot 460

Price: $5,000

 

Seller: Harvey W. Prins

Buyer: Clifford and Karen Evans

Property: Pinon Condos Unit 19FL, Bldg. 28

Price: $48,500

 

Seller: John and Joanne Snavely

Buyer: David B. And Deborah L. Kerns

Property: Continental Estates, Unit 1, Lot 12

Price: $125,000

 

Seller: Frederick R. and Hilda S. Huntress

Buyer: David G. Swindells

Property: Teyuakan Phase II, Lots 16 and 17

Price: $201,000

 

Seller: David G. Swindells

Buyer: David G. Swindells trust

Property: Teyuakan Phase II, Lots 16 and 17

Price: Not listed

 

Seller: Marjorie L. Lee

Buyer: Terry Evans

Property: Aspen Springs Subdivison 6, Lot 277

Price: $3,000

 

Seller: Jack R. and Mary S. Madore Liv. Trst.

Buyer: Jacmar Living Trust

Property: Echo Canyon Ranch, Parcel 1

Price: Not listed

 

Seller: Stephen D. and Donna S. Williams

Buyer: John V. and Jacque Hayes

Property: Aspen Springs Subdivison 6, Lot 646

Price: $24,900

 

Seller: Michael S. Hubertus

Buyer: Karla J. Ryff and Mathew L. Hardesty

Property: Town of Pagosa Springs, Lot 3, Block 34

Price: $102,000

 

Seller: Roderick L. and Sharon L. Buchen

Buyer: William P. and Linda A. Kipe

Property: 22-35-2W

Price: $55,000

 

Seller: Clinton Bill and Sylvia Ruth Whitney

Buyer: Giancaspro Construciton Inc.

Property: Pagosa In The Pines, Lot 1, Block 4

Price: $10,000

 

Seller: Eugene R. Jr. and Patricia S. Morales

Buyer: Lotsland Investors Inc.

Property: Lake Hatcher Park, Lot 121

Price: $7,000

 

Seller: Tracy L. and Karen L. Bunning

Buyer: Lotsland Investors Inc.

Property: North Village Lake, Lots 50 and 51

Price: $45,000

 

Seller: Craig A. Miller

Buyer: Reva Dann Duran

Property: Aspen Springs Subdivison 5, Lot 122

Price: $82,200

 

Seller: Richard A. Babillis

Buyer: Pamela Ann Barsanti

Property: Highwest Subdivision Unit 11, Lots 8 and 9, Block 1

Price: $130,000

 

Seller: Janko and Drenka Djuric

Buyer: Chris P. Hart and Norma J. Kitt

Property: Lake Hatcher Park, Lot 82

Price: $8,600

 

Seller: Eugene E. Huneycutt

Buyer: George Jr. and Gale M. Lovato

Property: North Village Lake, Lot 153

Price: $24,000

 

Seller: Marco F. Zvanik

Buyer: Charles W. and Brenda J. Coleman

Property: Aspen Springs Subdivison 4, Lot 17, Block 11

Price: $10,000

 

Seller: Steven F. and Ginger Ash

Buyer: Kirk W. and Caitlin M. Whitten

Property: Pagosa In The Pines Unit 2, Lot 357

Price: $6,700

 

Weather Stats

Date

High

Low

Precipitation

Type

Depth

Moisture

7/26

85

48

R

-

.10

7/27

86

49

-

-

-

7/28

82

47

-

-

-

7/29

86

44

R

-

.11

7/30

81

48

R

-

.03

7/31

83

47

-

-

-

8/1

84

44

-

-

-