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Arboles road destroyed, no help for residents

SUN Staff

Photo courtesy Christy Gotchall Flood waters tore apart the roadway on Cox Circle in Arboles Thursday. The road is not in the county system and, to this point, residents are stranded with no help from the county, and with no ingress or egress for their vehicles or for emergency vehicle traffic.

Photo courtesy Christy Gotchall
Flood waters tore apart the roadway on Cox Circle in Arboles Thursday. The road is not in the county system and, to this point, residents are stranded with no help from the county, and with no ingress or egress for their vehicles or for emergency vehicle traffic.

While flood waters are causing death and extensive damage on the Front Range of Colorado, persistent rainfall in Pagosa Country has caused river and stream flows to increase, has led to a noticeably nasty flavor in treated water and, in at least one instance, has destroyed a roadway and put residents on the road at a serious disadvantage.

The owners of eight properties on Cox Circle in Arboles, in the southern section of Archuleta County, found themselves stranded Thursday evening, their road cut by waters reportedly 8 to 10 feet deep.

The water washed out the road after a culvert on Sambrito Creek clogged with debris.

Concerned by the fact that the washout rendered their road impassable, with no ingress or egress for their vehicles or emergency vehicles, homeowners called Archuleta County Road and Bridge, said Christy Gotchall. They were told the road is not in the county system. The Road and Bridge response, said Gotchall, was to indicate that emergency medical and fire officials would be notified that the road is impassable.

Seeing no help on the horizon from the county, Gotchall said, “We’re going to pool our resources, and see if we can do something about it,” noting that the federal response to Colorado’s situation indicates a potential for assistance.

This story was posted on September 13, 2013.
  • Christy McKeithen Gotchall

    Thanks! We appreciate The Sun helping us get the news out. I’m asking your readers to please contact the Archuleta County commissioners at commissioners@archuletacounty.org and urge them to lend a helping hand to Cox Circle residents. We need your support!

  • Michael Lehner

    It’s not a certainty that you will be eligible for federal assistance. You will increase your chances of reimbursement if you save all your receipts. Rental equipment, load slips for rock, culverts or corrugated steel pipe, gasoline, and even your volunteer hours should be captured. Your best chance for reimbursement will be if you do a good damage assessment that lists clearly what was there before the disaster. Then restore the damage to pre-flood conditions. If you improve the site, you might risk funding due to the repair not following the scope of the damage.

    Good luck and God bless.
    Michael Lehner
    Cedar Rapids, Iowa

    • Christy McKeithen Gotchall

      Thanks for the advice. We will hold on to all receipts. I doubt there are any pre-damage photos of the culvert, but we have some shots of the current damage and I will take a few more before repairs are started.

  • John

    If its not a county road, than there will be no county help…. Resilience of neighbors get things done. You should know by now living in Arboles that you don’t see much support from and government. Pull together and get it done. That’s what used to happen and it used to be as wide spread as the entire nation. So let your attitudes pass on and recharge resilience.

  • Mark

    I agree stop looking to government for help, you chose to live out where you are, do like the old timers did and hire contractors or fix it yourself. I also live North Of Arboles but I take care of things myself and prefer it that way.